The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for April 11, 2019 – The “Not the Best Place to Live, Not Even Close” Edition

A Y2K-like bug brought down some of the city’s GPS systems, Pat Kiernan has a new podcast, MTA workers fight the upcoming L Project, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s favorite news anchor, Pat Kiernan, has a new podcast. (NY1)

The state senate unanimously passed the Religious Garb Act, which will allow the wearing of “any attire, clothing, or facial hair” protected under the Human Rights Law for religious purposes. (QNS)

US News & World Report released the 2019 best places to live and we’re… not #1. Are you insane? We’re 90 out of 125. If you want #1, go move to Austin. (NY Post)

Maybe traffic cameras should, you know, police traffic regulations. That’s what State Assembly Member Michael DenDekker is proposing by adding bicycle lane violations to what traffic cameras enforce. (Sunnyside Post)

Murderinos, this one has your name written all over it. An 80-year-old Queens man was arrested for a Virginia double murder from 1973. (Gothamist)

Turns out those protective sidewalk covers don’t do much when the whole damn building collapses on top of them. No one was hurt when it happened in Williamsburg, except a few cars and maybe a penny-farthing bicycle or unicycle. It’s Williamsburg after all. (Gothamist)

A pizzeria shakedown straight out of a Jon Stewart comedy routine, but it’s real and the “mobsters” are facing up to 20 years in prison. (Brooklyn Paper)

These marijuana entrepreneurs have HIGH hopes for legalization. Get it? HIGH HOPES! Ugh. (Gothamist)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

A guided dumpling crawl through Queens. (Eater)

After 35 years, bookbook on Bleecker Street will be closing. In order to stay open, the store would need a rent reduction and in 2019, that ain’t happening. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The five best grilled cheeses in the city. (Thrillist)

Foreclosures in the Bronx are up 28% in the first quarter of 2019. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s shortest bike lane has been found. (Brooklyn Paper)

This weekend’s “Blessing of the Rides” in Coney Island is a New York City annual tradition. Here’s what to expect from the egg cream christening to the blessing itself. (amNY)

A group of transit workers is calling the L Project’s (the new and crappy name for the non-shutdown) air quality into question with flyers saying the silica dust in the air is a danger to anyone who breathes it in. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez’ office broke up a gun trafficking ring after an undercover detective purchased three dozen guns, including automatic weapons. (amNY)

The Harlem School of the Arts will undergo a $9.5 million renovation that will begin in August and update the brutalist style exterior of the building with a glass wall, and make other welcome improvements. (NY Times)

There is no law dictating that your apartment be 80% covered with rugs, but most leases include it in a clause. What are the consequences for not complying? Well, that’s a little harder to define. (StreetEasy)

A look inside Manhattan’s first Ikea. It looks a lot like an Ikea, but you’re gonna look anyway. (Curbed)

The inevitable lawsuit over the city’s vaccine mandate has arrived. (Gothamist)

Why is there a 3,000 square foot bounce house in Dumbo? Because art, of course. (Time Out)

NYC is being afflicted by a Y2K-esque bug in some of its GPS systems. This is a once every twenty year GPS reset and city officials are being very tight-lipped about it. (NY Times)

What’s going on with the smoldering anus in Union Square? (Gothamist)

Saturday is Record Store Day, the most important holiday for the vinyl obsessed and for record store owners across the city. (amNY)

A look at City Hall Station, the unused subway station where the 6 train turns around which shows the grandeur of how the subways could have been. (NY Times)

The best neighborhoods for college grads. (Localize Labs)

Is removing stops the right way to make a bus route faster? Consider the case of the M14. (Bowery Boogie)

An interview with Carlo Scissura, the head of the new BQE expert panel. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Easter brunch spots.

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