The Briefly for May 17, 2019 – The “The Mayor is Bored of New York and Hates Being Mayor” Edition

Broad coverage of our mayor’s inadvisable run for president, the best beach day trips, Corey Johnson’s criminal justice reforms, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subways don’t look any worse than normal, with some diversions for the Brooklyn Marathon on Saturday. The 1, 3, J, and A trains all terminate early (no trains to Rockaway Beach, only buses and ferries). (Subway changes)

The best beach day trips from NYC. (6sqft)

“A former top aide for De Blasio told me this is exactly right: He is utterly bored and hates being mayor. He doesn’t expect to win but he just wants to get out of NYC.” (@eisingerj)

Ugh, he’s running for president. (NY Times)

The mayor’s campaign video, featuring him being chauffeured around the city in an SUV, had a theme of “working people first.” (Splinter)

The New York Times actually found someone who vocally supports the mayor’s presidential bid, which means she is one of the 25% of New Yorkers that aren’t opposed to him running. (NY Times)

The video alsofeatures the Brooklyn Promenade, the area the mayor proposed tearing down and replacing with a temporary six-lane highway. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Meet Dean Fuleihan, the city’s deputy and de facto mayor when ours decides that he’s bored fo the city and wants to leave. (NY Times)

Streetsblog has the right idea. With his presidential run, it is time for the mayor to resign. (Streetsblog)

It’s good to remember that the mayor has no control over the subways, and according to the Citizens Budget Commission if he did, it would be “too much pressure” and “miserable.” (Streetsblog)

Mayor de Blasio hasn’t even resigned out of boredom yet and Corey Johnson just earned his first endorsement for mayor. (City and State NY)

Corey Johnson announced on Thursday a package of proposals aimed at reforming New York City’s criminal justice system to be more fair and equitable, building on changes championed by progressive politicians and advocates in New York and Albany over the last several years. (Gotham Gazette)

The most splurge-worthy city restaurants, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

Forest Hills and Riverdale topped the list of the best neighborhoods for first-time buyers. (Curbed)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

Gothamist tested the lead levels in various parks around the city, and you’re not gonna be thrilled with the results. Especially if you go to the Prospect Park Bandshell. (Gothamist)

“Everything” you need to know about eating and drinking at the TWA Hotel. (Grub Street)

A look at a vintage map of the mall at the World Trade Center pre-2001. (Viewing NYC)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer is calling for free abortion care for all people who can’t afford it. He’s seeking $250,000 out of the city’s $92.5 billion proposed budget for the New York Abortion Access Fund. People with VA coverage or federal workers cannot use their medical insurance for abortion care and this would also cover visitors and tourists as well. (Gothamist)

Time to hit Tinder on W 72nd St. Seven summer date ideas on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The state’s legislature is ready to force the MTA to install elevators at any subway station undergoing a closure or renovation that would last at least six months. The bill is targeted at the MTA’s “Enhanced Station Initiative” which has been closing stations across the city for changes that are considered largely cosmetic. (amNY)

“Where can bad bitches on vacay dine ‘Sex and the City’ style?’ Blass Kayla Kumari Upadhaya, who actually answered this reader question for Eater. (Eater)

Take a look at the new renderings of Penn Station’s new main entrance. (Curbed)

I. M. Pei passed away at 102 on Thursday, but the city still bears the famed architect’s fingerprint. (Curbed)

The best happy hours in Manhattan. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 21, 2019 – The “No One Thinks de Blasio Should Run for President” Edition

A look at the Public Advocate debate, low-level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn, the city lied to get more FEMA funding, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It looks like a museum, but it’s a button store named for a Gertrude Stein poem. (Atlas Obscura)

The city subpoenaed 20,000 apartment listings from Airbnb as a response to what Mayor de Blasio says is Airbnb’s unwillingness to cooperate with the city to crackdown on illegal hotels. (The Real Deal)

The 11 best things to do on Roosevelt Island, but maybe you want to wait for spring first. (6sqft)

There is a special election for the city’s Public Advocate on Tuesday. As a reader of The Briefly you are among some of the most informed voters in the city. Here’s what you need to know about the election. (Gothamist)

Watch the second Public Advocate debate in full. (NY1)

There is one thing that all the Public Advocate candidates from last night’s debate agree on: Bill de Blasio should not run for president. (Politico)

StreetsPAC has endorsed Melissa Mark-Viverito for Public Advocate. (Streetsblog)

The 12 best restaurants in Rego Park and Forest Hills. (Grub Street)

Five takeaways from the Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

New York City will never become a cashless society if Councilman Ritchie Torres’s bill passes. (NY Times)

Low level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn. At a cost of $2,000 per arrest, it’s quite a bit of savings. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Can you run a business out of your apartment? (Bushwick Daily)

If you want to party like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide. If you want to avoid partying like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide of places to avoid. (amNY)

13 bars and restaurants for history lovers across the United States, including Manhattan’s Fraunces Tavern. (Atlas Obscura)

The gentrification of Bed Stuy is threatening the existence of the city’s last black-owned LGBTQ club. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Have you ever been through a breakup so bad that it makes you swear off dating altogether? The End Corporate Welfare Act is the City Council’s version of that with luring giant corporations to the city with subsidies. (Patch)

Take a look at Spike Lee’s New York City. (StreetEasy)

How can the MTA fix the R train? Congressman Max Rose’s solution is Solomon-esque. (amNY)

Murder in the city is up by 55% this year compared to last. Some police officers are blaming the end of stop and frisk. (NY Post)

The city lied to FEMA to get more Hurricane Sandy relief funding and will pay the federal government back more than $5.3 million as part of a tentative settlement. (NY Times)

East Harlem residents are feeling pissed about this closed public bathroom. So are the recipients of the more than 1,500 public urination summonses in the area. (Patch)

Winter is harsh on the city, but it causes chaos, explosions, fires, leaks, and uncertainty underground, where electric, steam, water, and gas lines flow. Climate change is making it worse. (NY Times)

Bookmark this list for the next extremely cold day. 19 stellar soups. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 28, 2018 – The “Hold On to Your Knutstorp, Here Comes a Manhattan IKEA” Edition

The next phase of the Second Avenue Subway might finish by 2027, the 7 train’s new signal woes continue, a mysterious paralyzing disease hits NYC, 13 steakhouses, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

There isn’t much budget for restoring artwork with NYCHA’s $32 billion deficit. The friezes from sculptor Richmond Barthé are in desperate need of maintenance. (amNY)

Brooklyn’s got some new frost-resistant water fountains in Prospect Park. (Brooklyn Paper)

You can either line up at 3pm to get a spot to see tonight’s Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting, or you can stay home and watch it on TV, Facebook, Twitter, or NBC’s website. (Curbed)

The infamous “Five Shots of Anything for $12” Continental in the East Village has a closing date, December 15. (Page Six)

10 lesser-known Andy Warhol spots in the city. (6sqft)

If you want NYC Celebrity of the Year Mandarin Duck footage, you’re in luck. (Gothamist)

The city has a new Chinese food destination neighborhood: Forest Hills. (NY Times)

13 classic steakhouses in the city. (Eater)

See the water damage the MTA regularly fixes in subway tunnels and stations. (Viewing NYC)

Yeah, everyone hates that Trump-loving gay couple the NY Times profiled. (HuffPost)

Snug Harbor’s Winter Lantern Festival will give you a reason to visit Staten Island. (Time Out)

The second day of the brand new signals meant to make 7 train service more reliable was full of signal-related failures. (NY Post)

Legal e-scooters are one step closer to being a reality. (Curbed)

Are you sitting down in your POANG? IKEA is coming to Manhattan. (6sqft)

18 solid restaurants in Long Island City. (Eater)

A mysterious paralyzing disease, called AFM, has shown up in New York City. It’s been described as “polio-like.” If you have weakened muscles and reflexes a week after a cold, get yourself to a doctor. (Gothamist)

RIP Tom Margittai, the man who revitalized the Four Seasons. (NY Times)

Sanitation Salvage, the private garbage company responsible for over 50 accidents and two deaths, is surrendering its license and going out of business. (NY Post)

The city is considering alternatives to their “tear down the Brooklyn Promenade” approach to replacing the BQE, but isn’t making any promises. (Brooklyn Paper)

The City Council is trying to make it illegal for businesses to go completely cashless. (Politico)

What does a nightmare commute look like? How about two people getting into a fight while getting onto a subway, followed by spraying a “mace-like” substance into the crowd, sending four people to the hospital. (NY Post)

The next phase of the Second Avenue Subway is underway, but won’t be completed until 2027 at the earliest. 20 years for six subway stations. (Second Avenue Sagas)

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