The Briefly for June 10, 2020 – The “An Actual Piece of Good News for NYC” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of NYC restaurants, the repeal of 50a, each borough gets a Black Lives Matter street, support for disbanding the NYPD, restaurant guide, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 80˚
Rain overnight.

Mayor de Blasio announced that while the city may seem ready for a June 22 phase two reopening, we shouldn’t expect phase two to begin before July. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Sunday was a new low for the city in a good way. Only 1% of people tested for Covid-19 tested positive. Hospital admittances were at 52 on Sunday, far from the peak at 850. Transmission is still high, with hundreds of new cases every day. This good news isn’t a reason to stop being careful, it’s signs that what we are doing is working. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is supporting the idea of disbanding the NYPD, looking to follow Minneapolis’s lead. Police Benevolent Association President Pat Lynch is against the idea, but let’s be clear about this, he doesn’t get to have a seat at the table or a voice in this discussion. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The State Senate voted to repeal 50a. Governor Cuomo has vowed to sign the legislation. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

City courts are scheduled to reopen starting today since their closure in March, with precautions. Outside of emergencies, most matters will still be handled virtually. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Here are the rules for outdoor dining, which is allowed starting with phase two, slated for June 22. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

That hasn’t stopped restaurants from putting out tables and chairs for customers, which are inevitably used for dining. The most blatant is the White Horse Tavern, which announced it was open for business on Instagram and has been encouraging customers to use the tables and chairs for dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state has released its rules for indoor dining, as portions of the state are already looking at phase three. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If tables aren’t placed more than six feet apart, restaurants may have to construct five-foot barriers, ie. cubicles, between the tables with a maximum of 10 people per table. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deeper look at six critical points for restaurants before reopening. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Alibi Lounge, one of the city’s only Black-owned LGBTQ bars is in danger of closing. There is a GoFundMe, which is at $11,000 of its $50,000 goal. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

When will you be ready to go back to concerts, fly in an airplane, or attend a dinner party? The Times asked 511 epidemiologists and the short version is that it could be a year or more before things come close to returning to normal. (Margot Sanger-Katz, Claire Cain Miller and Quoctrung Bui for NY Times)

Today’s hero is former Mayor de Blasio Senior Adviser Alison Hirsh, who resigned after the mayor’s near-unconditional defense of the NYPD and will begin as an adviser to Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza in the Department of Education. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Now that the City Council and state legislature have rendered his opinion unnecessary for public debate, the mayor is in support of banning chokeholds and possible NYPD funding cuts. Always ready to take a stand one second after it doesn’t matter. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“But right now we’re asking him to speak up, we’re asking him to stand behind his campaign, we’re asking him to stand behind his mission of equity, we’re asking him to just support us. He isn’t listening to us.” Why did Mayor de Blasio’s staffers protest him on Monday? (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Photos: Just because curfew is over does not mean the protests in support of Black Lives Matter have stopped. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Portraits: Why we are protesting. (Hiram Alejandro Durán for The City)

Officer Vincent D’Andraia was charged with assault for shoving a woman protesting to the ground. He’ll be charged with misdemeanor assault for the incident. The victim of his assault hit her head on the ground and sustained a concussion and seizure after the attack. (John Del Signore and JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Video: Wrapping up the NYPD union’s garbage rhetoric in one minute and nine seconds. (@bubbaprog)

One street in each of the five boroughs will be painted to send a message to New York City: Black Lives Matter, mirroring Washington DC’s tactics. The streets were not specified when the announcement was made. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Recent reports have been raising concerns that the NYPD’s Intelligence Division, along with the FBI, have been questioning protesters arrested on curfew violations about their political sympathies and affiliations, along with their social media behavior. This would violate a 35-year-old consent decree meant to keep the police from investigation protected political speech. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A guide to New York City’s sculpture parks. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Sometimes you need to turn your mind off and look at a list of banal things. Here are 11 celebrities spending their quarantine in NYC. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

So you’ve optimized your bedroom and workspace while suffering through the quarantine for Covid-19, it’s time to turn your attention to some creative entryway ideas. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 1, representing Greenpoint and Williamsburg, bought itself an SUV with public funds last year, which wasn’t the most popular decision. It was scheduled to hold executive committee elections this month, but the board has introduced a measure to suspend this year’s elections. Nothing like an old-fashioned power grab in the middle of a crisis. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Say farewell to whatever the hell “Rhode Island-style” pizza was supposed to be. After a year in the East Village, Violet is closing its doors. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A Bronx Democrat City Councilmember who has publicly said may vote for Trump, has made openly homophobic statements, and opposes abortion. Meet Rubén Díaz Sr., who wants to represent the Bronx in Congress. (Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

“The winner in the 15th Congressional District will face untold numbers of issues in office next year. The candidate we believe will most closely align himself with the values and goals we hold dear is Ritchie Torres. And we know only too well that the election of Ruben Diaz, Sr., would be a tragic step backwards for the cause of equality and inclusion in American society.
-Paul Schindler for Gay City News, Progressives Must Unite Around Ritchie Torres in the Bronx

Photos: Congrats to the winners of Coney Island USA’s “Maskies” face mask competition. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Apartment Porn: An $2 million Hamilton Heights apartment with a roof deck as big as the apartment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Harlem’s Schomburg Center released the Black Liberation Reading List, a list of 95 books that foster a greater understanding of Black history and culture. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

NYC restaurant reopening guide. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 14, 2020 – The “Your Reservation for The L Train is in 45 Minutes” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 12 miles of new open streets, the NYPD take aim at Dr Oxiris Barbot, the possible end of the Staten Island Yankees, a brunch delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 58˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain overnight.

I haven’t been tested this whole time.” -Mayor de Blasio (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city is adding 12 additional miles of open streets today/Thursday. Some protected bike lanes that have been long-planned were also announced for opening throughout the month. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The MTA is looking into “everything” when it comes to crowd control and reducing packed subway cars once the city starts reopening, including reserving space on subways and buses. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The chaos at Elmhurst hospital exposes the city’s lack of a cohesive healthcare system and shows that all we have are a series of hospitals that are ill-equipped to work as a team. (Jim Dwyer for NY Times)

The police union is calling for the head of Dr. Oxiris Barbot after she denied an NYPD request for 500,000 surgical masks during the height of the pandemic. Her response was that she “didn’t give two rats’ asses about your cops.” Okay, maybe that’s not the best response, but the NYPD’s total headcount is 55,000, why do they need 500,000 masks during a PPE shortage? (NY1)

It must be fun to be NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea because he seems to exist in a reality that the rest of us don’t inhabit. According to Shea, the problem with the NYPD’s selective and racially biased enforcement isn’t the NYPD, the problem is the people the NYPD are enforcing the rules on. No one doubts that being an NYPD officer is one of the toughest possible jobs in the city, but to argue that when a cop with a violent history beats the shit out of an NYCHA groundskeeper with no criminal history, it’s the groundskeeper’s fault? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It was only a few months ago that I linked to a story about Brian Quinn, aka Q from “Impractical Jokers” on TruTV reviving the Rubsam and Horrmann name for brewing company in Staten Island. Covid-19, like with most things, pumped the brakes on his places. Now their unused beer is being used to create hand santizer, working with Kings County Distillery in Brooklyn. (Roger Clark for NY1)

State Senator Julia Salazar earned Bernie Sanders’s endorsement in her re-election campaign, along with financial support from his followers. State Senator Mike Gianaris also earned Sanders’s support for his beating back of Amazon in Queens. (Andrew Karpan for Bushwick Daily)

82 kids are being treated for pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome. Fourteen states and five European countries are investigating the syndrome. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The move by Major League Baseball to downsize minor league teams is still moving forward, and the Staten Island Yankees are still on the chopping block. Game attendance was at its lowest last season and its games are the third-lowest attended games in the league. This could be the last season for the team if the season ever gets started. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

There’s a commissioned new mural at Atlantic Terminal by Brooklyn artist Jason Naylor which adds a splash of bright color, titled “Hope,” to the city. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo added a sign language interpreter to his daily press conferences after being sued by Disability Rights New York for not including one. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Crews at Green-Wood Cemetery have been working seven days a week with shifts that can be longer than 17 hours to keep up with the demand for cremation and burials. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

In a sign of good news, healthcare workers now have a lower rate of infection than the general population, which points at being careful and taking precautions actually working. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Are we ready for in-person shopping to look very different? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

David Chang is closing Momofuku Nishi for good. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The City Council passed a package of legislation to help small businesses on Wednesday that aims to protect commercial tenants from harassment by their landlords and restrict the fees that third-party apps such as Grubhub and Uber Eats can charge businesses during states of emergency. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

The New York Times has discovered something new during the pandemic: the outside. (Alexis Soloski for NY Times)

The city is supposed to be stepping up to help New York’s homeless when the subways close at 1 am. NY1 followed the trains to the end of the tracks to find a city that was not equipped to help the people that need it the most. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

Plan your weekend, here’s a brunch delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Karen for today’s featured photo of a new way to get car-free streets in the city.

The Briefly for May 6, 2020 – The “Getting Punched in the Head Feels Excessive” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Everything you need to know about NYC’s subway overnight shut down, The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, New York wants to “Reimagine Education,” & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 55˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

Last night was the start of the four-hour subway shut down for cleaning. The MTA will be testing UV lights and anti-microbial products after each car is disinfected. While the trains are shut down buses will be operating for free. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The overnight shut down of the subways, explained. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The Times chronicled the historic night one of the MTA’s first-ever planned subway shutdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Is the end of 24-hour subway service? No, according to the governor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Another day, another video of NYPD officer punching a black New Yorker in the head during a social distancing arrest. “A punch should not be assumed to be excessive force.” -Dermot Shea, NYPD Commissioner. The person being arrested appeared to be handcuffed, on the ground, and had three officers on top of them when punched. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 10 best bike shops in New York City. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

We’ve got an Aerogarden in the kitchen with some cherry tomatoes, how’s your quarantine garden going? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Like many of us, Andy Warhol bounced around the city, and so did where he did his work, The Factory. A look at where Andy Warhol lived and worked in NYC. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

Looking to work on your art in quarantine? The Metropolitan Museum of Art is offering a free botanical drawing class online. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn is “ill equipped” to identify cases of COVID-19 and stop the disease from spreading among its nearly 1,700 detainees, according to a doctor who visited the federal jail last month. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Mariah Kennedy-Cuomo, the governor’s daughter, made the suggestion that not everyone wants to listen to Governor Cuomo tell them what to do, so the state is launching a competition for New Yorkers to submit videos explaining why its important to wear masks in public. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s National Nurses Week from May 6-12 commemorating Florence Nightingale’s work in Crimea in 1854, and it couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time to honor the nurses in the city and across the country. (Isabelle Bousquette for QNS)

More information on the possible Covid-19-relate illness that has stricken over a dozen children in the city, from ages 2-15. If you have a child with a rash, abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea, please contact a doctor.(Amanda Eisenberg and Erin Curkin for Politico)

Welcome2TheBronx has started a fundraising campaign to continue its coverage of the Bronx. The site has been around since 2009 and has become one of the more important voices when it comes to covering and changing the narrative about the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

There wasn’t much good news to be found in City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s analysis of the city’s 2021 fiscal budget, which starts on July 1. The budget gap is looking to total about $8.7 billion and with an unemployment rate of 22% this quarter, the city is finding itself dug into a pretty deep hole. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A last-minute NYC mother’s day gift guide. Yes, during a pandemic, Wednesday is the last minute when it comes to Mother’s Day. (The Infatuation)

Video: These sidewalk tents are a pretty good way to keep your social distance. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is turning to The Gates Foundation to help “reimagine education” for the state of New York as we continue forward with our new normal. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Over 1,200 independent music venues and promoters have banded together to form the National Independent Venue Association, or NIVA, with the goal of “securing financial support to preserve the national ecosystem of independent venues and promoters.” There is a letter template you can use to send to your state and city officials to show support for the city’s independent music venues. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A worker at Amazon’s Staten Island, New York, fulfillment center has died of Covid-19, the company confirmed. Workers at the facility, called JFK8, have been calling for greater safety precautions since early March. (Josh Dzieza for The Verge)

A look into how The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, proposed by Representative Ilhan Omar, may affect you. (Localize Labs)

All hail Hakki Akdeniz, the pizza champ, for distributing pizzas and snacks to those in need on the Bowery over the weekend. (Bowery Boogie)

It’s looking like a rainy set of days ahead, but when it gets warm here is where to get freshly made ice cream and pies in NYC. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Thanks to Jenny for today’s featured photo from the Upper West Side!