The Briefly for December 11, 2020 – The “Rats Run This Chipotle Now” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: A raccoon is saved, the world’s largest menorah, the headless Santa, Andrew Yang weighs his options for mayor, NYC’s iconic food, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 53˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 39˚ High: 57˚

A deep dive into the Art Deco works of Ralph Walker. (Jeff Reuben for Untapped New York)

Service on the E and M lines will be rerouted between Christmas and New Year’s Day between Roosevelt Avenue and West 4th Street from 5 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 26 to 5 a.m. on Monday., Jan. 4. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights Post)

A guide for first-time buyers of co-ops in NYC. (Ann Lien for StreetEasy)

Video: The city still has our love for our trash panda overlods. Check out this raccoon rescue from the ledge of a building in Tribeca. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The rats may be slowly taking over the city from the raccoons. A Chipotle in the Bronx have been taken over by rats, who have been biting the staff and eating the avocados. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The voters in New York City chose to utilize ranked-choice voting with a referndum in 2019 election, but that isn’t stopping the City Council from speaking out against it, calling it voter suppression. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo; the co-chairs of the Black, Latino and Asian Caucus, Adrienne Adams and I. Daneek Miller; and Councilmembers Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Farah Louis, and Robert Cornegy, a candidate for Brooklyn borough president, along with 10 community organizations are suing to stop ranked choice voting. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

A little Christmas horror anyone? the headless Santa of Rite-Aid on 1st Ave. (EV Grieve)

Welcome Chaun Donovan to the packed list of mayoral contenders. Donovan served under Mayor Bloomberg as the head of housing and under President Obama as the head of HUD and OMB. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Andrew Yang is still weighing his options when it comes to running for mayor. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

We had our first snowfall of the season this week. It’s time to ask the usual question this time of year: Will we have a white Christmas this year? (Adam Nichols for Patch)

How to send a letter to Santa. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Pizza is NYC’s most iconic dish, according to the people who answered the Time Out Index survey. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Donald Trump’s childhood home is up for sale and you can still swoop in and create NYC’s largest public toilet because the fundraiser trying to buy the home for $3 million only raised $125. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Where to east in Bushwick. (Olivia Laskowski for Eater)

Winter is coming. Well, it already snowed once. 15 things New Yorkers do to prepare for winter. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Brooklyn Assembly Member Robert Carroll has one of the worst ideas of the year, and this year has been full of awful ideas. Taxing every delivered package by $3. Thanks, McLovin. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Along with taxing every delivered package in the city, there’s also talk about killing unlimited MetroCards. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

Happy Hanukkah to all readers celebrating. The world’s largest menorah is on display outside the Plaza Hotel. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

McSorley’s doesn’t change much. Say hello to Teresa Maher de la Haba, the first female bartender, representing one of top five changes in the bar’s history. (Molly Wilcox for Bedford + Bowery)

Pat Kiernan’s contract with NY1 is now at the center of the lawsuit by five of his female colleagues over gender and age bias. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

I’m a sucker for a very specific list. The best West Village & Tribeca restaurants on Caviar. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

New York representatives Elise Stefanik and Lee Zeldin are on the list of the 106 Republicans that refuse to accept reality. Neither represents the city. (Stephanie K. Baer for BuzzFeed News)

Apartment Porn: Unfortunately you missed out on this $57 million duplex penthouse on W 57th with Central Park views, four bedrooms and five and a half baths. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Some more good news? There was a humpback whale spotted swimming in the Hudson River. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

There aren’t many surprises in NYC’s top Google searches of 2020. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here’s where all the surprises are: Dredgers found two cars at the bottom of the Gowanus. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

January 19 is the official start of the Gowanus rezoning. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: Who doesn’t love a good holiday window? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYC filming locations for HBO Max’s The Flight Attendant. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Where to find some fancy latkes for Hanukkah. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Data Visualization: Comparing the coverage of the subway vs the replacement buses, overlaid with racial and occupational data. (@julestrainman)

The statue of Christopher Columbus in Downtown Brooklyn appears to be on borrowed time. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Robert Sietsema’s 15 best dishes of 2020. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from the Hudson Yards!

The Briefly for April 10, 2020 – The “Bodegas and Fran Lebowitz Will Be There When Things Go to Hell” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Normplay, Cuomo doesn’t share de Blasio’s optimism, SNL works from home, Lincoln Center’s summer programming is canceled, restaurant spices, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 50˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 44˚ High: 61˚

When the Governor is begging the nation to send healthcare workers to New York, imagine how shitty you have to be to threaten to fire your employees for speaking out about bad conditions in your hospital. Instead, hospital administrators are encouraging “appropriate” social media posts with uplifting messages instead. The City Council is planning legislation to prohibit the firing of health care workers for speaking publicly about hospital conditions. (Noam Scheiber and Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

Video: It’s almost weird to see videos of people crowded into Times Square. (ActionKid)

Plans to turn Cathedral of St. John the Divine into a hospital have hit the breaks. The public story is that a leveling off in infections is the reason, but there are also tensions between the church’s leaders and Samaritan’s Purse, the company operating Central Park’s field hospitals, who hold anti-Muslim and anti-LGBTQ stances. (Liam Stock for NY Times)

New Yorkers always know that when everything goes to hell, we can count on our bodegas. (Aaron Randle for NY Times)

“Never. It didn’t even occur to me. The morning of September 11th, someone called me and said, “We’re going to Connecticut. We can pick you up. Do you want to go?” I was just shocked that anyone would want to leave. I’m not leaving. In fact, I feel that I am like the designated New Yorker. Everyone else can leave. This is beyond saddening for me, to see the town this way.” –Fran Lebowitz is never leaving New York City. (Michael Schulman for The New Yorker)

Inside Coronavirus: Chinatown Stories, a video series making an effort to bring attention and love to Chinatown and Welcome to Chinatown, a grassroots initiative to support Chinatown restaurants. (Cathy Erway for Grub Street)

If you’ve been wondering “Why are the city’s landmarks lit up blue?,” it’s for the city’s essential workers. It started at Windsor Castle in the UK last month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

In praise of making noise at 7 pm every night. (Amanda Hess for NY Times)

Everyone can submit an absentee ballot for the June 23 Democratic primary, thanks to an announcement from Governor Cuomo. (Emily Davenport for QNS)

Are you one of the 1/3 of renters in the country who didn’t pay April’s rent on time? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look inside the U.S. Open stadium’s makeshift hospital. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

The story of how the Yankees became the Yankees, 107 years later. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Traffic is down 60% on the BQE and speeds are up 288%. Proof that when you remove cars from the streets, the remaining vehicles can travel faster. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Have you hit the point where you miss all of the city’s inconveniences? Try Normplay. Nothing will make you appreciate staying at home like re-creating the pains of living in the city. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor is feeling optimistic about relaxing the city’s quarantine at the end of May, but Governor Cuomo doesn’t share his optimism. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

PHotos: Separate, but together. Portraits of New Yorkers under quarantine. (Caroline Spivack with photos by Johnny Cirillo for Curbed)

Saturday Night Live is doing a “work from home” episode this weekend in what will surely be one of the weirdest television experiences of this pandemic. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

All of Lincoln Center’s summer programming is canceled for 2020. Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Midsummer Night Swing, and Mostly Motzart are all canceled. It’s not all bad news, they’re planning a pop-up festival for whenever we’re allowed to go outside again. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

There are a lot of dark clouds lately, but let’s discover the silver linings. (6sqft)

Looking to emulate your favorite dishes from your favorite restaurants? Here are some restaurants in the city selling their spices and seasonings. (Luke Forney for Eater)

“We’re working with Google to come up with an online mechanism that bypasses any phone certification.” -The governor is working with Google to update the state’s unemployment verification process and remove phone verification, the hardest part of completing an unemployment claim. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The New York Historical Society wants your paper and digital ephemera that document all aspects of the current crisis. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral Easter Mass is being streamed to Facebook and YouTube this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Hart Island, the city’s potter’s field, normally sees about 25 new bodies buried by inmates each week. Lately, it’s two dozen bodies a day and contract laborers have been brought in to perform the burials. The photography in this article is absolutely chilling. (Christopher Robbins, Sydney Pereira, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The latest slap in the face to restauranteurs and their staffs is GoFundMe making it difficult for the donated funds to be withdrawn. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Times asks “Did New Yorkers Who Fled to Second Homes Bring the Virus?” The answer is yes. (Sarah Maslin Nir and Tracey Tully for NY Times)

10 great cookbooks and cocktail books from NYC restaurants and bars. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The Briefly for March 19, 2020 – The “These Are the Groceries We Refuse to Buy” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The first positive case of COVID-19 is not negative, how to help the elderly, a walk through the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, and more

Today – Low: 49˚ High: 53˚
Rain in the morning and overnight.

The first New York City dweller to test positive for novel coronavirus, the teacher who returned from Italy, no longer has the disease and is expected to make a complete recovery. With a negative test, it may mean that she’s immune to the disease going forward. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

NYC United Against Coronavirus is a resource Google Doc that breaks out neighborhoods, and multiple ways to send and receive help. (NYC United Against Coronavirus)

The Gowanus Dredgers, the people who canoe in the Gowanus Canal, have put together a Google Doc of Gowanus businesses with verified information bout what’s open and what is not along with if a business has a fund for the staff. It’s a very good model for other neighborhoods. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

Four ways to help the city’s elderly people. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Cheddar cheese ramen noodles? A look at the groceries we refuse to buy, even in a crisis. (Claire Leaden for SecretNYC)

Looking at a map that visualizes ridership drops per subway station, you can get a clear picture of who has to go to work in a crisis and who has the luxury to stay home. (Ben Wellington for I Quant NY)

The MTA sustained $87 million in weekly revenue losses, which might not be great news for an agency that was already projecting being half a billion in the hole in a few years. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’re still taking the subway, Riders Alliance has a survey for you to take.

12 things to livestream or virtually explore. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Despite the environment of fear, the empty streets, riderless transit, and patronless bars and restaurants, private construction continues undeterred across the city. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The city is working on drive-thru clinics for coronavirus testing, but there are no concrete plans for people without cars. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

If hospital capacity is not vastly increased, Manhattan’s hospitals would be overwhelmed with coronavirus patients even in the most conservative of possible scenarios. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The USNS Comfort has been dispatched to the New York harbor. The hospital ship contains 1,000 hospital beds, which New York City is in desperate need of right now. (Curtis Brodner for BKLYNER)

Union Square Hospitality Group is laying off about 2,000 employees. Danny Meyer announced that he was forgoing all of his compensation and donating it to a relief fund for all USHG employees. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The volume of the unemployed has saturated the New York Department of Labor’s phone lines and crashed their website multiple times. This is the new system and it’s absolutely real. People whose last name begins with A through F should file on Monday; G through N on Tuesday; and O through Z on Wednesday. If you missed your day, you can file on Thursday or Friday. (Mary Frost for Brookly Eagle)

A live music critic opines about having no live music without self-pity. (Jon Pareles for NY Times)

Amazon has temporarily paused ordering CDs, vinyl, and all other items other than “household staples, medical supplies, or other high demand products” amid the coronavirus pandemic. Once the warehouses have no more, they won’t be restocked until at least April 5. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklyVegan)

As the slow-rolling disaster of the COVID-19 pandemic trickles down, the trash hauling industry is bracing for impact without commercial business, there’s less commercial trash to haul. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Only 50 percent of a business’s workforce can report to work outside their homes for the duration of the coronavirus outbreak, as mandated by Governor Cuomo. Businesses that provide food, medicine, and shipping supplies are exempt. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Central Park remains Manhattan’s oasis during a crisis. (Roger Clark for NY1)

A list of independent bookstores that are delivering cookbooks if you’re looking for recipe inspiration. They’re delivering normal books too. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Department of Justice announced late Tuesday night that it was closing many of the nation’s immigration courts through early April. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

There are two specific populations where a COVID-19 outbreak would become a disaster. The first population is the people in the city’s homeless shelters. A woman was identified as carrying COVID-19 within a shelter and has been hospitalized and the 8 people who shared a room with are all in quarantine. How do you enforce social distancing when you put between 8 and 20 beds in a room? (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The second population is inmates.. An inmate and a Department of Correction officer who works at gate security on Rikers Island have both tested positive for COVID-19. The Board of Correction is recommending finding low-risk inmates to release in order to allow more social distancing to prevent the virus from spreading further (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Liquor deliveries by apps like Drizly or Minibar have skyrocketed since bars closed on Monday. Every day is like New Year’s Eve. (David Gauvey Herbert for Grub Street)

Photos: Personal goodbyes from bars and restaurants across the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden, on its last day being open to the public. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

City Health Department officials have warned Hasidic medical professionals in Crown Heights that as much as 80 percent of the neighborhood may have already been exposed to COVID-19. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Met is projecting a $100 million loss in revenues in the coming months, as well as the likelihood of layoffs. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Following yesterday’s story about the Lyft and Uber Pool, the MTA has finally moved to limit Access-a-Ride vehicles to one passenger. (Michelle Bocanegra for Politico)

Mayor de Blasio tried to walk back his shelter-in-place comments, but the damage has been done and almost everyone remembers the de Blasio from two weeks ago that everyone hates. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

The Times profiles Brian Lehrer, the voice of NYC on the radio. (Jazmine Hughes for NY Times)

Takeout and delivery options for every situation. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)