The Briefly for May 23, 2019 – The “Who is the Super-villain Destroying Our Commutes?” Edition

Gentrifying neighborhoods belong to rats, the NYPD adds nearly 300 officers to the streets, everyone hates Bill De Blasio and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The story of a community response that saved Prospect Heights’ Ode to Babel bar from becoming a victim of the NIMBY-ism that comes with gentrification. (Grub Street)

It all started with the arrest of Michael Cohen. A look behind the scenes at the full year and 450 interviews from The New York Times‘ investigation into how taxi medallions ever became worth $1 million. (NY Times)

Who is the city’s supervillain pulling emergency brakes on subways and destroying our commutes? Whoever it is, they’ve been doing it for months, and possibly tears, without getting caught. (Jalopnik)

Here’s how the NYC Care Card works and what it does and does not entitle you to. (Norwood News)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is testing her political capital with an endorsement of Tiffany Cabán for Queens District Attorney, who also received endorsements from the Democratic Socialists of America, Real Justice PAC, and the Working Families Party. The primary is June 25. (NY Times)

Eight is great… unless that’s the percent of people polled who have a favorable opinion of you. Mayor de Blasio’s national favorability rating is below the president’s and the worst among anyone running for president. (Patch)

One thing that gentrification brings to a neighborhood? Rats. You may have read about the block in Prospect Heights where the rats have basically taken over, but it’s becoming a trend across the city. As more buildings have construction done, it displaces rats by destroying their burrows, forcing them to come to the surface. (NY Times)

A guide to the OMNY, which starts its slow takeover of MetroCards in 8 short days. (Curbed)

New York City is last on the list of popular destinations for retirees to live. About 15,000 seniors moved out of the city from 2016 to 2017. The top places are, unsurprisingly, Florida and Arizona. (Patch)

Video: Here’s how you can help to compost with food scrap drop-offs. (Viewing NYC)

A city council proposal to exempt yellow cabs from congestion pricing is short-sighted and foolish, according to experts. Politicians are blaming the fees for a declining number of rides and not a combination of continued congestion on the roads and app-based alternatives that make yellow cabs less desirable. (Streetsblog)

Don’t look now, but there are more vegan options in the city than ever and chefs are working to lure unsuspecting non-vegans to the dark side. Even fast food chains like Burger King and Taco Bell are getting onboard with plant-based options. (amNY)

The city’s news moves pretty fast. Blink and you’ll miss the rest of the story. What multiple people thought was a woman dressed as a character from “The Handmaid’s Tale” on the verge of committing suicide turned out to be a folded up red umbrella. (Gothamist)

Congrats to Washington Heights’ Maelyn Jarmon for winning season 16 of The Voice. (amNY)

Everything you need to know about raising chickens in NYC. (6sqft)

It’s time to take a look at President Trump’s tax returns. A bill passed the state’s legislature on Wednesday that would allow the state to hand the President’s state tax returns to Congress. The governor has voiced support in the past and is expected to sign the bill shortly. (Patch)

Google purchased another building in Chelsea to expand its footprint and keep on target to double the number of employees in its New York offices in the next ten years. (amNY)

The “LGBT in 2021” campaign is aimed at getting better LGBTQ representation into the City Council. (amNY)

All five borough presidents joined over 70 early childhood providers and Comptroller Scott Stringer in calling on the city to scrap its plans for pre-K and early childhood programs and start over saying the current plan would weaken the city’s social safety net and hinder community-based organizations to provide early education programming. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The “Summer All-Out” program will send almost 300 additional NYPD officers to high-crime areas in an attempt to reduce homicides and violent crimes. (amNY)

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The Briefly for April 23, 2019 – The “DA’s Secret List of Tainted Police Officers” Edition

Someone is smashing the LinkNYC kiosks, $3,000 “affordable” apartments, Di Fara’s pizza, fighting back against the paper bag tax, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Someone is smashing LinkNYC kiosks in Chelsea. It could be someone trying to send a message to neighborhood resident Google, who basically owns them and the data they collect. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

It’s been discussed for over a dozen years, but the federal government’s Opportunity Zone program may be the catalyst that changes Willets Point forever. (The Real Deal)

Taxed to death. That’s how Queens City Councilmember Robert Holden views the city’s paper bag nickel tax when plastic bags become banned. (QNS)

The city’s DAs keep secret lists of NYPD officers who have perjured themselves in criminal prosecutions in order to avoid using them as witnesses. Civil-liberties advocates are calling for a review of past convictions based on testimony from potentially tainted officers. (Gothamist)

He’s not wrong, New York’s taxes paid per income is 12.7%, the highest in the nation and 22 of the top 25 counties paying the highest amount of taxes are in New York state. Manhattan specifically pays 2.7% of all federal income tax collected with only 0.48% of the country’s population. (Business Insider)

Say hello to the newest restaurants in the city. (amNY)

Kudos to Queens educator Danielle Hnath, who promised her students she would dye her hair blue if they raised over $8,000 for the American Heart Association. They raised $10,000. (QNS)

Technically they apply, but something doesn’t seem right about a $3,000/month apartment on Staten Island qualifying as fulfilling the mayor’s promise to create 300,000 “affordable” apartments. (The City)

The top twelve restaurants serving the underrated food of Puebla, Mexico. A very specific list. (Eater)

NYCWiN, which went down for a full week due to a Y2K-esque bug, cost the city a billion dollars. Northrup Grumman’s contract has been extended to June 2020 for $40 million. (Patch)

A look back at Five Points, not the mural space, the most notorious neighborhood in the city’s history. (StreetEasy)

The best neighborhoods for New Yorkers over 65, or the best neighborhoods for people under 65 who want to live in a very quiet apartment building. (6sqft)

A series of self-guided and thematic NYC exploration walks, created by New Yorkers. (r/NYC)

The NYPD, having solved the city’s other problems, targeted a “Race and Bake” bike ride on 4/20, showing up to arrest the organizer with printouts of his social media posts. He was arrested for an open ticket container ticket he got in 2015. (Gothamist)

How Di Fara became an NYC pizza institution. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a recycling center, from truck to 1,000 plastic bales. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city wants to expand Staten Island’s dockless bike share program, but without the entire island having a single bike lane. (Streetsblog)

The eight oldest buildings in Queens. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA, in a surprisingly logical move, is looking to add solar panels to the roofs of its train yards, bus depots, and buildings. (amNY)

Get ready to vote in a completely different way. The Charter Revision Commission’s preliminary staff report hint that the city will end the practice of costly runoff elections during primaries by adopting ranked choice voting. (The City)

Ranked choice voting, aka the alternative vote, explained. (CGP Gray)

Where to have a unique dining experience. Yeah, it’s not exactly a descriptive title for a list of restaurants, but lets’ be honest that you’ll probably click on it anyway because it’s the last link in the email and you’re probably more than a little curious, no? (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for January 31, 2019 – The “Amazon Threatens to Walk” Edition

Mayor de Blasio won’t stop talking about his fired staffer, the Winterfest saga continues, the unwilling public advocate candidate and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Winterfest organizer Lena Romanova used a pseudonym to harass vendors and the press. Complaints against Winterfest are being reviewed by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Brooklyn Assemblywoman Latrice Walker is a candidate for Public Advocate, even if she doesn’t want to be. (Gothamist)

Amazon plans to sponsor computer science classes in more than 130 of the city’s high schools. (TechCrunch)

Amazon executives have expressed frustration in private at their treatment in New York and made veiled threats of walking from their Long Island City plans during a three hour city council meeting. Maybe some computer classes weren’t enough to win over the long list of groups who are against HQ2. (NY Times)

Reminder: Google is building a $1 billion campus with no bargained tax breaks from the city or state. (NY Mag)

A ranked list of the city’s best matzoh ball soups. (Grub Street)

Watch a snowstorm kick the city’s ass for 30 minutes in this 29 second time-lapse. (@mattmfm)

The MoMA PS1 Skyspace is closed while the 5 Pointz construction obstructs a view of the sky that’s supposed to be completely unimpeded. (Curbed)

Take a look at the photo of the guy reviewing the place and ask yourself “Does this man look like he would enjoy himself a Taco Bell that serves booze?” (NY Post’s uptight Steve Cuozzo)

The city released a draft of Gowanus’ rezoning. Just try not to think about the decades old toilet that’s currently running through the neighborhood. (6sqft)

Watch the Queens president Melinda Katz’ State of the Borough 2019 address. (Melinda Katz)

A very small number of the 30,000 New Yorkers eligible for half priced MetroCards have signed up for the Fair Fares program. (Gothamist)

The city’s high school dropout rate hit a record low in 2018. (Chalkbeat)

How to watch next week’s the public advocate debate. (amNY)

“We’re not happy with the service. And we do owe the public an apology” MTA president Pat Foye. Pat Foye wins this week’s “no shit” award. (NY Post)

Mayor de Blasio can’t stop digging himself deeper when it come to his former aide fired after sexual harassment accusations. Now he’s blaming the governor of Montana. (NY Post)

16 date night restaurants in the East Village. (Eater)

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