The Briefly for December 18, 2018 – The “New York: Now With 100% Legal Nunchucks” Edition

Governor Cuomo lays his impressive 2019 agenda on the table, zombie raccoons are hitting the streets, a $2,000 pearl found in a meal, the most checked-out library books, and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

Shooters shoot, and Governor Cuomo is shooting his shot when it comes to the 2019 legislative agenda. (Gothamist)

First on the table is legal weed. Governor Cuomo announced 2019 is the year for legal marijuana in New York. (NY Times)

One of the loftier goals set forth by Cuomo is a Green New Deal for New York state. The goal is to be 100% carbon neutral by 2040. (Politico)

Legal pot and a Green New Deal is only a small piece of the governor’s 2019 agenda. In the first 100 days of the term he plans on launching a $150 billion infrastructure fund, a congestion pricing plan, ending vacancy decontrol, repealing preferential rent, and much more. (Curbed)

If you think that Governor Cuomo could get through a speech in public without being interrupted by Amazon protestors, you were wrong. (NY Post)

Cowabunga! New York’s ban on nunchucks was declared unconstitutional. (NY Post)

Stabbings, weddings, live music, and alcohol. A look back at the history of Hank’s Saloon, which draws lineage back to 1903, ahead of the iconic dice’s closing in January. (The Indypendent)

The city’s top 10 preservation battles in 2018. (Curbed)

Google is going to be investing $1 billion to build a new Hudson Square campus, with plans to build 1.7 million square feet and hiring an additional 7,000 employees. (The Real Deal)

Jennifer Egan, Dan Brown, Margaret Atwood, Jesmyn Ward, and Michael Wolff top off the most checked-out books in New York’s libraries. (6sqft)

Bill Murray, legend. The indomitable Mr. Murry joined Puss N’ Boots’ Norah Jones, Sasha Dobson, and Catherine Popper on stage for their annual Christmas show at the Bell House for some merrymaking. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The Fair Fares program is supposed to begin in 2019 for low-income New Yorkers, but no plans have been announced. (Gothamist)

Nitehawk Cinema opens in Park Slope on Wednesday after a $10 million renovation, complete with two bars, food, and movie theaters too. (6sqft)

The chances of finding a pearl in an oyster are 1 in 12,000, but the chances of finding a pearl worth between $2,000 to $4,000 in an oyster at the Grand Central Oyster Bar? Much higher. (Gothamist)

It’s been two years since the Four Season Restaurant’s owner Julian Niccolini pleaded guilty to sexual assault, but it took negative reviews in The New York Times and New York to actually get him ousted. (Eater)

That mysterious green goop stored in the dumpsters of the L train shutdown? It’s probably color inaccuracies in the photos. Or that’s what THEY want you to think. (Gothamist)

The Statue of Liberty protest climber, Therese Patricia Okoumou, was found guilty. (amNY)

Mandarin Ducks? Brooklyn’s had them for years. (Gothamist)

The top 10 theater productions of 2018. (Time Out)

There are multiple reported sightings of zombie raccoons outside of Prospect Park, venturing into the city’s streets. If you come across a raccoon on the street, avoid it and call 311. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you thought the NYCHA’s problems weren’t society’s problems, if the city lost 10% of its public housing, homelessness would increase 62%. (Curbed)

HOLLA🎄D TONNEL no more. (NY Post)

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The Briefly for November 9, 2018 – The “El Chapo Can’t Hug His Wife” Edition

Weekend subway changes, Industry City looks to expand, changing how private garbage trucks operate, Times Square Trump protests, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The 4, 6 and Q trains have decided to take most of the weekend off, the L continues it’s mini-shutdown, and the rest of the weekend’s scheduled subway changes. (6 soft)

Is rent reform headed our way after the midterm elections? (Curbed)

Speaking of rent, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is headed to Washington DC and is worrying about living there for three months before her Congressional salary kicks in. (Vice)

El Chapo requested that he be allowed to hug his wife. Request denied. (NY Post)

In a rare act of someone in public office keeping their word, the acting Attorney General Barbara Underwood will be returning to her job as state solicitor general once Letitia James is sworn in. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

As Industry City in Sunset Park looks to expand to include hotels, new buildings, an academic campus and more, the community is faced with the question of who benefits from allowing the city’s largest private industrial complex to expand. (Curbed)

11 became 12 at the Bowery Mural to remind us that we literally can’t stop shooting each other. (Bowery Boogie)

A man shot at City Point was the fourth person shot in Downtown Brooklyn in the last five months. Bobby Jackson, 44, was arrested for shooting Carlton Spencer, and Gregory Kimble, 26, was arrested for reckless endangerment, according to the NYPD. (Brooklyn Paper, NY Post)

Former AG Eric Schneiderman will not face any charges after four women accused him of assault. (Politico)

JFK’s redevelopment is in the early phase, but it’s expected to be complete by 2021. (Airport Voice)

Someone put up a white supremacist flyer in Woodlawn, declaring a day of “White Strength” in November fighting against “Black thugs” and “radical islam.” Woodlawn is 46.7% white. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Brooklyn’s iconic Watchtower sign will be replaced, but it will be up to the building’s anchor tenant to decide what it will say. (Curbed)

An “affordable” housing lottery in Long Island City is starting at $2,125/month rent. For a studio! Affordable 2 bedrooms start at $2,731. (LIC Post)

Google and Facebook received no state subsidies when creating their NYC campuses. Why should Amazon? (Politico)

A few questions that need answering before Amazon invades Long Island City. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s holiday nostalgia rides return on November 25. (Curbed)

The NYPD arrested two teens accused of knocking the hat off the head of a 14-year-old Jewish boy, pushing a girl to the ground, and hurling a pipe at a Bedford-Stuyvesant synagogue. (Brooklyn Paper)

80% of drivers that get a speeding ticket via a camera never get a second ticket. City Council Member and Public Advocate hopeful Jumaane Williams has received 27 school zone speed camera violations, 10 bus lane violations, 4 failure to display meter receipts, 4 inspection sticker expired or missing, and 2 no parking tickets. (Streetsblog)

The city has a plan for private sanitation companies that will reduce truck traffic 18 million miles on an annual basis and reduce pollution by 63%. Don’t expect it to happen so fast, the transition to the new plan is scheduled to happen between 2021 and 2023. (Gothamist)

Just when you thought Christmas displays couldn’t get more ridiculous, here comes Bloomingdale’s with an ice skating rink in their basement. (Time Out)

Governor Cuomo has flavored e-cigarettes in his crosshairs, vowing to ban the sale of them in New York next year. Vape ’em while you got ’em. (NY Post)

Over 36,000 buildings are considered landmarks in the city, but did you know The New York Landmarks Preservation Commission has been declaring people landmarks since 1994? (Atlas Obscura)

Is William Seely of Brooklyn the leader of the nationwide Mad Stone Bloods gang? He was arrested in Manhattan and is being help without bail on a 27-count indictment. (NY Post)

22 savory Asian snacks in the city. (Eater)

This is what Times Square looked like before and during the Trump/Sessions/Mueller protest on Thursday evening. (Reddit)

Uber, the New York chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, Staten Island Borough President James Oddo and District Attorney Michael E. McMahon are bringing free Uber rides to Staten Island on Thanksgiving eve. Everyone can use two rides for up fro $15 each to get to and from your destination. (SILive)

Take a look at the shiny new subway cars on the C line on their maiden voyage. (Dj Hammers)

30 terrific spots for Breakfast in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 8, 2018 – The “No One Wants to Be On El Chapo’s Jury” Edition

Albany’s new faces, an investigation into Eric Garner’s death starts today, the elections aren’t over yet, a jury has been chosen for El Chapo’s trial, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the five new faces headed to Albany to represent the city in the State Senate. (amNY)

The jury has been selected for the El Chapo trial, despite an “open rebellion” against the idea of being on the jury. (amNY)

Low-level marijuana enforcement is down 58% and arrests are down by 90% in one year’s time, thanks to Mayor de Blasio’s policy change in the spring. While the overall numbers decreased, it did not change the racial disparities of who is being policed. (Politico)

This is a different type of defense. A Columbia University student is claiming that he couldn’t have raped another student because he was “too drunk.” He claims to have drank enough to black out and claim he has a blood ties to Nazis. He sounds like a real winner. (NY Post)

10 memorable art installations at the Brooklyn Bridge, past and present. (Untapped Cities)

Of 142 garbage trucks from private companies inspected during the city’s one week crackdown, only ten were allowed to stay on the streets. During the week the city issued 1,070 summons. (NY Post)

You thought we were done with elections? With Letitia James becoming Attorney General on January 1, the city will schedule an election for Public Advocate. Anyone who can get enough signatures will be on the ballot. (amNY)

Not to be outdone by Shakespeare in the Park, Central Park’s SummerStage will also be getting an upgrade and will be ready for the 2019 season. (6sqft)

Is the Museum of Pizza “fine art”? (NY Post)

It’s time to go to The New York Botanical Garden, we’re almost at peak foliage. (amNY)

A guide to our current elected officials. (Curbed)

WFAN’s Craig Carton from “Boomer and Carton” is guilty of securities fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit fraud. He could be going to prison for 45 years. (NY Post)

Rudy Giuliani divorce is shining a light on his peculiar spending habits. (Gothamist)

The NYPD blames the “current atmosphere” for the rise in hate crimes across the city. Don’t forget the NYPD blamed the increase in reported rapes on the #MeToo movement earlier this year. (Gothamist, amNY)

Eric Garner died on July 17, 2014. Four years later, the Civilian Complaint Review Board is beginning an investigation. (NY Times)

7 of the city top chefs share their favorite bodega food. (NY Post)

The average salary in NYC is $68,992. (TitleMax)

The Board of Elections can’t promise that the 2020 election will be better than 2018’s. In 2016, the BOE rejected a city offer of $20 million to find and fix systemic problems. (NY Post)

Not to be outdone by Amazon, Google is planning on hiring thousands of new employees and adding 1.3 million square feet of office space on the West side of Manhattan. (NY Times)

A restaurant where you dine alone and don’t speak to, or see, your waiter. (NBC New York)

All the free museum days across the city. (Time Out)


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