The Briefly for May 19, 2020 – The “Central Park Has Exorcised its Demons” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Where to get a Covid-19 test, good news for vegans, de Blasio eyes a September reopening of the city, subway ridership starts to return, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 65˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, hitting only 3 of the 7 metrics necessary to start phase one of reopening.

It’s time to register to vote by mail for the June 23 primary. Here’s how. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

There was a protest to open up Staten Island, which included all the hits like “it’s just like the flu” and “you don’t coward in your house and stay afraid.” (Amy Yensi for NY1)

Samaritan’s Purse, the temporary hospital run by Franklin Graham, who believes same-sex relationships are an “abomination,” is gone from Central Park. Members of Reclaim Pride, Rise and Resist, and Reverend Billy Talen’s Stop Shopping Choir have exorcised the demons left behind by Franklin Graham. (Donna Aceto for amNewYork Metro)

The loss of Gem Spa beings up an important question. Will we recognize our city when we emerge from our forced hibernation? (Max Falkowitz for Grub Street)

“That’s a real natural point to start reopening more if all goes well because that’s when everyone would normally come back from the summer.” Mayor de Blasio has tentatively pegged September for a full reopening of the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re taking the subway or bus, look down. The MTA is adding social distancing markers to encourage you to keep your damn distance. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

“I want to watch the Buffalo Bills,” is not something anyone says earnestly, but here we are. It’s 2020 and Governor Cuomo wants New York teams to play in empty stadiums, even if he has to watch the Buffalo Bills. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Let’s face it. 2020 is a wash. Let’s start thinking about 2021, campsite reservations across New York state are open. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Of the city’s 21 miles of open streets, Staten Island only has 1.3 miles. (Kamillah Hanks and Rose Uscianowski for Streetsblog)

It’s a combination of the worst and the best time to start looking for a new apartment. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

WeWork wants a rent break. Its customers do too. (Peter Eavis for NY Times)

Rockefeller Center is looking 192 pieces of artwork that celebrate New York City to fly as flags above the rink in August as part of “The Flag Project” competition. Now you know how many flags are in the plaza at Rockefeller Plaza. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Dr. Oxiris Barbot issued a public apology for telling an NYPD top brass “I don’t give two rats’ asses about your cops.” Now we wait for an apology from the Sergeant’s Benevolent Association for calling Dr. Barbot a bitch on Twitter. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Circa is a condo in Harlem at the corner of 110th and Central Park West and its glass facade is gaining a reputation for bird slaughter. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC Nightlife United is an emergency fund providing immediate relief to shuttered cultural spaces affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Small business owners can start applying for aid on June 5. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

Congrats to Brooklyn’s Andre Kulikov for winning the 6th-8th grade category of the Ezra Jack Keats Bookmaking Competition. (Nigel Roberts for The Brooklyn Reader)

It’s not summer without Coney Island, so we may just cancel summer this year. Here’s what Coney Island may look like once it’s allowed to open up. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city is preparing fencing to keep people off the beaches in Coney Island and Brighton Beach to keep crowd sizes down during Memorial Day weekend. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Whoever vandalized the Covid-19 memorial on the corner of 10th and Ave A, you are the city’s worst scumbag this week. (EV Grieve)

The MTA’s Essential Connector program is live, giving essential workers a free trip in a for-hire-vehicle per night while the subways are shut down. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Porn star Ron Jeremy is trying to prevent a tree from being cut down outside his childhood home in Queens. Make your own “wood” jokes. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The City Council is pushing a bill forward that would create three drop-off sites for organics and community recycling centers for hazardous or e-waste in each community district by June 2021. Existing drop-off locations are closed. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Inside the Guggenheim is the “Countryside, The Future” show in the windows facing Fifth Avenue, which features cherry tomato plants. The Times found David Litvin, who moved his family to New York from Tel Aviv for six months so he can tend to the plants for the museum. The tomatoes are looking great, but his six-month stay hasn’t been going according to his original plan. (Elizabeth A. Harris for NY Times)

Video: Take a tour of Prospect Park’s Lefferts House. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is hoping to open in July. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Vegans rejoice! Superiority Burger is offering a unique menu of to-go options every Thursday, starting this week. You have to order in advance, so don’t start showing up on Thursdays expecting to be able to buy anything on the spot. (EV Grieve)

Maybe Covid-19 will usher in a new era of automat-style restaurants in the city. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Governor Cuomo was tested during his Sunday press briefing and tested negative. The test was an encouragement for New Yorkers to utilize the 700 testing sites set up across the state. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re uninsured, CityMD is offering free Covid-19 testing. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

All churches in the city are closed to the public, some are finding a higher calling as Covid-19 testing sites, mostly in Queens and the Bronx. (Carol Kuruvilla for HuffPost)

The state is providing antibody tests for all MTA employees as part of Governor Cuomo’s mandate that all essential workers are tested. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Covid-19 death count per NYC zip code. The highest death rate is in Canarsie, at 612.24 deaths per 100,000, followed by Rockaway with 444.73 deaths per 100,000. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The NYPD shut down up a Brooklyn Yeshiva in Bed-Stuy for violating the state’s orders that all schools be closed. I’m not a big “call the cops” kinda guy, but if you see kids walking into a school, it’s time to call the cops. (Liam Stack and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

It’s happening slowly, but riders are returning to the subways. We’re not at pre-pandemic levels, but the numbers are going up. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The quarantine and takeout guide. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Molly for today’s featured flower photo!

The Briefly for May 7, 2020 – The “Playing Governor Cuomo BINGO” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Nets go back on their promise to pay arena workers, the NY presidential primary is back on, a $20 million UES mansion, and more

Today – Low: 49˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

There are 64 potential cases of children in New York with a mysterious inflammatory disease associated with COVID-19. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Photos: The first night of the subway lockdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

“Being a bus driver at 1 a.m., you’re already on edge.” With overnight subway service suspended, bus operators are concerned more unruly passengers will be coming their way. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Let’s play Governor Cuomo press briefing BINGO. (Jen Carlson and Sarah Butler for Gothamist)

The New York Democratic presidential primary is back on for June 23, thanks to a ruling by US District Judge Analisa Torres. The ruling is in response to Andrew Yang’s lawsuit. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

John Bonizio, the owner of Metro Optics in the Bronx, has continued to pay all 56 of his employees through the closure of all their stores. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Despite a promise to pay its workers while the NBA is on indefinite hold, but at least 15 workers have not been paid. Joe Tsai, the owner of the Nets, is worth $10.6 billion. (Andy Hirschfeld for Observer)

There are people who will never ride the Cyclone because they will say it’s not safe, so it’s hard to imagine what Coney Island could do to make people feel safe and still open this season, but they’re getting ready with the hopes they’re allowed to celebrate July 4th with the city. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

While the coronavirus has drastically changed many components of American life, the age-old issue of racial disparities in law enforcement has once again come to the fore, thanks to the NYPD. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

10 great seafood dishes still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The mayor has been shit-talking the federal government all week but spent Wednesday saying that without a stimulus for the city, city workers will face furloughs and layoffs. The mayor would not get into specifics, ensuring the highest amount of stress possible for all city workers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

In an attempt to widen the state’s Covid-19 testing, there is some unsubstantiated reporting that 3,000 grocery stores will become testing locations. Get some blood testing done while you pick up some more yeast. (Emmo Orlow for Time Out)

“It was a cascade. And, by the way, I fully endorse it. But, literally, our income went to zero.” Inside the ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ broadway show as it went from night three of previews to indefinite hiatus. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

It’s been chilly after last weekend’s great weather. Where to order something when you’re in the mood for a bowl of something warm. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. dropped charges in a major construction fraud case this week. But he’s not blaming allegations of prosecutorial misconduct — he’s blaming Covid-19. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Can a fast food restaurant be considered a NYC treasure? The answer is yes if you’re talking about Roll N Roaster, which has reached legendary status amongst New Yorkers. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

As the months tick by, we’re going to see more places go from closed indefinitely to closed permanently. The latest to be added to the permanent list is Daddy-O in the West Village. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A soup kitchen run by the Coalition for the Homeless is seeing a 50% spike in demand since Covid-19 broke out. (Jacqueline Baylon and Claire Molloy for Business Insider)

“I’ve loved producing MUG for the past 28 years, but with things being the way they are, I’m closing MUG today, with a heavy heart for the city I love.” Manhattan User’s Guide, an invaluable resource run by Charlie Suisman has ended its 28-year run. Charlie has a new novel out called Arnold Falls. (Manhattan User’s Guide)

Today marks the next set of streets to close to vehicles and open to pedestrians and cyclists. How many miles of open streets will be added today? Two, bringing the total mileage to 9. The city has a goal of 100 miles by the end of the month. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Apartment Porn: A $20 million mansion on the Upper East Side with multiple fireplaces, a roof deck with a hot tub, a garden, a Juliet balcony, a circular skylight, and just steps from Central Park. If $20 million is too much, you can rent it for $85,000/month. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It turns out that storing dead bodies in a UHaul truck on Utica Avenue isn’t a crime, it’s disgusting, but not a crime. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

12 affordable NYC dining options for takeout and delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

thanks to reader Madeline for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 29, 2020 – The “Cherry Blossom Drone Footage Will Relax You” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The MTA attack Mayor de Blasio over the city’s homeless, large crowds violate social distancing at a rabbi’s funeral, the beer delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Unemployed, A Brooklyn Bartender’s Lament. (Hope Morawa for New York Cliché)

The best bike rides in Brooklyn according to Jacqueline VanDusen, who has biked them all. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

If you were trying to successfully reopen the state, would you think to invite James Dolan or Jeff Wilpon to the panel, the geniuses who have given us the modern Knicks and the Mets? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A drones eye view of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s cherry blossoms. (Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

The MTA is changing its policies to be more strict when it comes to the homeless population. It will no longer allow shopping carts in stations and no one will be allowed to spend more than an hour on the platform before they are asked to leave. Clearly whoever wrote these guidelines has never tried to leave Greenpoint at 3 am on a Wednesday night. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The Mayor should get out of his car and into the subways so he can see what is really going on and solve the problem of his own making.” -MTA spokesperson Abbey Collins. The mayor has failed to live up to his own standards and has blown his own self-imposed deadlines to place 2,500 of the city’s homeless population into hotel rooms by April 20. He missed that deadline by 1,500. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Add Nathan’s to the list of companies who returned their federal small-business loans. Nathan’s had received $1.2 million. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

RIP Tina Girouard, a 1970s SoHo art scene pioneer. (Randy Kennedy for NY Times)

New York’s unemployment offices are backlogged and 400,000 New Yorkers are still waiting for their MArch unemployment checks. The state has a 3,000 person staff who have delivered $3.1 billion to about 1.5 million people so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It hasn’t been an easy road, some errors from the unemployment office resulted in personal information, including social security numbers, being mailed to the wrong people. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Rough Trade NYC shut down music sales when the store was shut down. A month later and they’re back to selling music, online only. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Worried that your fluffy buddy may have COVID-19? Here comes the NYC COVID-19 Pet Hotline. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

What’s open? Here are a few maps showing what’s open in a few neighborhoods across the city. (6sqft)

Veniero’s and Veselka in the East Village will be open for delivery starting Friday. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

RIP Dr. Lorna Breen, medical director of the emergency department at New York-Presbyterian Allen Hospital in Manhattan, who died by suicide. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

At the East end of Delancey St there’s an N95 mask vending machine. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Half of NYC knows someone who died from COVID-19, according to a new Siena Research Institute poll. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Nancy Blum, whose beautiful mosaic work adorns the 28th St station n the 6 line is releasing ornate coloring book pages for free. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio’s special councils to help reopen the city are small businesses; larger businesses; public health and healthcare; arts, culture and tourism; labor; nonprofits and social services; faith-based; and education and vocational training. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Apartment Porn: Inside Sister Parish’s $3.5 million Fifth Avenue Maisonette. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Every student in kindergarten lower and middle schools will either meet standards/need improvement system when it comes to grades this year, essentially a more polite pass/fail. If you “need improvement” you’ll be receiving it in summer school. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Squibb Bridge, which connects Brooklyn Bridge Park to the Brooklyn Promenade, will be op en on May 4, after replacing the previous incarnation, which was structurally flawed. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

CityMD Urgent Care is now offering walk-in tests for COVID-19 at all of their locations across New York City. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Photos: The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds flyover. (Photos by Dean Moses)

Not everyone was a fan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is New York City a city full of idiots? The flyover, which was supposed to be in tribute to the region’s medical workers, must have been so spectacular that a whole lot of New Yorkers forgot social distancing guidelines. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Brooklyn parents say underground yeshiva classes are flourishing in Borough Park — but cops closed a 311 grievance about one in just 16 minutes in the middle of the night. (Reuven Blau and Yoav Gonen for The City)

The NYPD had to disperse a crowd attending the funeral of Rabbi Chaim Mertz. The mayor appeared in person to oversee, as multiple funerals in Brooklyn’s Jewish communities have required NYPD intervention in the last two months. I give the mayor a lot of shit on a regular occasion, but attempting to enforce social distancing without being called an anti-Semite in this situation was absolutely impossible. This kind of gathering and what happened with Tuesday’s flyover are both completely preventable, but no one called the NYPD or mayor nazis or compared them to Wilhelm Frick for dispersing crowds after the flyover. (Liam Stack for NY Times)

Photos of the funeral’s crowd size and density are very different from the photos of the flyover crowds. (@ReuvenBlau)

The signs are still pointing to an Andrew Yang mayoral bid in 2021. (Matt Stevens for NY Times)

The beer delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader JoAnn for today’s featured flyover photo!