The Briefly for August 1, 2019 – The “There Are Many Reasons to Dislike Mayor de Blasio” Edition

The Governor’s strategy to stay in the news, mustard ice cream, a call for bike lanes in Long Island City and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Congrats to Queens’ Dalilah Muhammad for breaking a world record in the 400-meter hurdles. (Patch)

Sunday is Lou Reed Thai Chi Day at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch. (amNY)

It took four days of public pressure, but the mayor has finally acknowledged the Brownsville tragedy as a mass shooting. According to the mayor, he’s “come to realize it’s critical we call this what it was.” Would he have changed his mind if not for being publicly chastized about his choice of words? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“De Blasio Appealing To Rural Voters By Touting Destruction Of New York City Under His Watch.” This article from The Onion is so close to reality it’s almost not funny. (The Onion)

All of the 2020 candidates’ favorability ratings increase with the most national exposure they have, except Bill de Blasio. The mayor is the only presidential candidate with a net favorability rating that is under zero. (FiveThirtyEight)

The biggest problem with the mayor is that there are a lot of petty reasons to dislike him, from the time he maybe killed a groundhog in Staten Island to his refusal to not be driven eleven miles to work out, to just being painfully uncool, but for every petty reason there is a substantive reason like his handling of Eric Garner’s death or his multiple ethics scandals or his handling of the Amazon HQ2 situation. Who would continue to run for president despite being universally disliked and polling at virtually zero? The same kind of person that would see 75% of the city he is the mayor of doesn’t want him to run for president in the first place and do it anyway. (Vox)

The mayor is on the presidential trail claiming the city will pass a paid personal leave bill this year, but the city council is not committed to his timeline. (Gotham Gazette)

15 new public art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into law that prohibits school districts to allow teachers or administrators from carrying guns in schools. To quote the governor, the answer to the nation’s school shooting problem “has never been and never will be more guns.” (NY Times)

Have you noticed a steady stream of news about the governor signing bills into law this month? It’s a strategy that Cuomo uses to stay in the news during an otherwise quiet month of the year. (Politico)

Video: What is Louise Jean Signore from the Bronx’s secret to living to 107? Never get married! (Welcome2TheBronx)

The roof of Essex Crossing houses the Essex Crossing Farm. At 10,000 square feet, it’s the largest urban farm in Manhattan and their annual goal is at least 10,000 pounds of produce a year. (Bedford + Bowery)

7 minority-owned businesses in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The mayor is still on pace to hit 300,000 new affordable housing units by 2026, but production has dropped by 22% this year. The difference from 32,344 to 25,299 can partially be attributed to a rare deal made in 2018 for 5,000 units, and not the rent reform laws passed this year, as landlord advocates have claimed. (Gothamist)

The city could do a lot with $40 million, but it’s spent that amount on misconduct lawsuits against the NYPD since January. (Gothamist)

A look at Jay Myself, a documentary which takes a look at the longtime owner of one of the city’s most enigmatic buildings. (Curbed)

City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is calling for a Long Island City bike lane network. (LIC Post)

What has the city done to prevent cyclists from getting doored? “Basically nothing,” according to the founder of the Dutch Reach project. (Gothamist)

How to stay safe as a cyclist, and of course all drivers should know about the Dutch reach. (Brooklyn Based)

A group of luxury homeowners sued to try to stop the city from installing protected bike lanes on Central Park West. It was denied by a judge and construction has begun. (Gothamist)

An interview with Sally Tallant, the new director of the Queens Museum. (Untapped Cities)

The story of 24-year-old David Ballinger, who learned the hard way through a nearly unbelievable series of events that when it comes to finding an apartment in New York City, don’t trust anyone. (Gothamist)

City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer’s latest opinion piece: We need a childcare revolution in N.Y.C. (The Villager)

Mayoral hopeful and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s latest opinion piece makes the appeal for the Brownsville shooting not to reduce the neighborhood to a stereotype, drawing comparisons to the president’s recent treatment of Baltimore. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed that Amazon seems to be interested in all of New York City except Long Island City? (LICtalk)

Three Republicans in the state’s legislature want to make throwing water on police officers a felony. The Legal Aid Society called the proposed legislation “embarrassing.” (Patch)

The cause of death for Layleen Cubilette-Polanco, the transgender inmate found dead in her Rikers Island cell last month, was due to an epileptic seizure. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

A third person has drowned at Rockaway Beach this year. (amNY)

Mustard ice cream? Yeah, it’s a thing and Coolhaus is giving some away this weekend for National Mustard Day, sponsored by French’s Mustard. (Gothamist)

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The Briefly for January 15, 2019 – The “8% Rate of Success” Edition

Early voting passes the state legislature, Governor Cuomo thinks the city should foot half the bill for the subway, the best winter brunches, the Amazon-Chrysler building, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

10 short interviews about congestion pricing with state legislators. (Streetsblog)

The annual No Pants Subway Ride happened. There are photos. (Gothamist)

Voting reform passed the state legislature, which adds 10 days of early voting, consolidates state and federal primary dates, and pre-registers 17 and 17-year-olds when they sign up for a driving permit. A constitutional amendment was proposed that will allow same-day voter registration and allow anyone to vote absentee without an excuse.(CBS New York)

Signal problems caused delays during 92% of weekdays in 2018. Since the city enacted the Subway Action Plan, delays have increased. (Daily News)

The state is doubling the amount of speed cameras in the city’s school zones as part of Governor Cuomo’s state budget, increasing from 149 to 290, which matches the number of cameras the state’s legislature was trying to pass last year. (Streetsblog)

The best winter brunch spots. (Thrillist)

This is why we can’t have nice things. The city is suing Metropolitan Property Group for running an illegal Airbnb network in 130 apartments, which housing more than 75,000 guests from 2015 to 2018. (The Real Deal)

Okay, so “Amazon” is the new default answer for any question, but who will be the Chrysler Building’s new tenant? Yup, Amazon. (6sqft)

Here’s what to know about the city’s new, updated and existing ferry routes. (amNY)

Meet Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the the Metropolitan Opera new openly gay conductor. (NY Times)

Say farewell to Westsider Books on Broadway in the Upper West Side. Not every closing bookstore has a Lin-Manuel Miranda. (West Side Rag)

“Being from Staten Island gives you that ability to brush it off.” Being from Staten Island made the cast of MTV’s “Made in Staten Island” immune to criticism that they are tarnishing the pristine public image of Staten Island. (amNY)

The secret economy of diabetes test strips. (NY Times)

Everyone wants to be the one that fixes the subways, but no one wants to pay for it. (NY Post)

Do you have what it takes to drink this $375, 20 pound spiked hot chocolate? (Time Out)

Five things to look for in today’s state budget address today (Tuesday). (amNY)

The Port Authority removed the Saudi Arabia part of the “Candy Nations” art installation due to its proximity to the World Trade Center due to complains that point out the Saudi connection to the 9/11 attacks. (NY Post)

JFK and Laguardia airports have been providing food to TSA and Federal Aviation Administration workers while they aren’t paid during President Trump’s government shutdown. (Airport Voice)

The government shutdown means no family visiting at Metropolitan Correctional Center, the high-security federal jail in Manhattan that houses terrorists, white-collar criminals, and El Chapo. Prisoners are on a hunger strike after the second week of canceled visits due to staffing shortages. (NY Times)

Turns out a plan similar to governor Cuomo’s new L train non-shutdown was considered and rejected five years ago because of serious safety concerns. (NY Times)

He can decide the L train shutdown isn’t happening and declare emergency meetings of the MTA board, but Governor Cuomo still claims that he’s not in charge of the MTA. (Second Ave. Sagas)

The person handpicked by Mayor de Blasio to head up his BQX streetcar project left the United States for a new job in Saudi Arabia. (Politico)

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The Briefly for November 29, 2018 – The “Your Delivered Packages Are Becoming A Problem” Edition

A closer look at the Amazon HQ2 tax breaks, the Fearless Girl is no longer staring down the Charing Bull, the best splurge meals in the city, Central Park destroyed, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Have you RSVP’d to break 6ix9ine out of federal prison?

Amazon Cuomo makes a plea to the president to fund The Gateway Program, a new train tunnel for Amtrak and New Jersey Transit under the Hudson. (NY Times) Cuomo claimed the meetings were positive, but with no actual progress. (Politico)

Central Park, destroyed by a (theoretical) eco-terrorist attack. (6sqft)

Have you been noticing the amount of packages sitting in the lobby of your building piling up? You’re not alone and it’s becoming a problem. (The Real Deal)

The 20 best splurge meals in the city. (Eater)

Fearless Girl, who stared down Wall St’s Charging Bull since March 2017, is gone. (amNY)

More anti-Semitic vandalism, this time at Columbia University. (Gothamist)

The incoming investigation commissioner isn’t planning to take any shit from Mayor de Blasio. (NY Times)

Roman’s, Diner, and Marlow & Sons Are giving up on their “no tips” policy starting December 17. (Eater)

Inwood’s Carrot Top Pastries is closing in January after 40 years. The building the bakery is in has been without gas since December 2017 and business has suffered tremendously as a result. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s “replace Rikers” plan has started to fall apart. The Manhattan location has been scrapped. Will the mayor fulfill his dream of breaking ground before he exits office? (Curbed)

The guide to dining in the Theater District. (Eater)

An Uber driver is accused of dragging a man with his car after allegedly verbally berating the passenger and his husband with homophobic slurs. The man who was dragged was refunded, the driver’s Uber account was suspended, and the NYPD is investigating. (NY Post)

A closer look at Amazon’s HQ2 tax breaks. (Gotham Gazette)

Photos from the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree lighting. (Untapped Cities)

This is the happiest news you’ll read all day. Hooray for Pickles and Violet, reunited with their humans after both going lost. (Bklyner) A close second? Mark Ruffalo lost his backpack in a cab, and it was returned to him after a public call to assemble for the Avenger. (@MarkRuffalo)

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