The Briefly for January 28, 2020 – The “Is See Something, Say Something No Longer Adequate?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: City Council staff is a step closer to unionizing, Coronavirus, AOC quits the Sunnuyside Yards steering committee, the best fried rice dishes, and more

Today – Low: 31˚ High: 44˚
Clear throughout the day.

The Spotted Pig, as rumored over the weekend is closing. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here’s how to get a half-priced MetroCard from the city’s Fair Fares program, if you qualify. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It’s like a black and white cookie, but it’s a vegan milkshake with chocolate chips, black n’ white cake, whip cream and chocolate drizzle. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The MTA launched a new “Kindness. Respect. Solidarity.” campaign to encourage riders to report hate crimes, harassment or graffiti on the subways. This differs from the “See Something, Say Something” because for this campaign if you see something, you should… say something. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

More than 400 City Council staffers seeking to unionize to improve working conditions asked Council Speaker Corey Johnson to recognize them on Monday. If Recognized, this would be the first independent unionized legislative staff in the country. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

10 secrets of the United Palace, Manhattan’s fourth largest theater, celebrating its 90th year. (Untapped New York)

The best mac and cheese on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos: Inside the Central Park Club, an exclusive 100th floor private club looking over Central Park. (alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Video: New Yorkers rescued a woman trapped under an SUV on Sunday night by “collectively lifting” it off the ground. The woman trapped under the SUV was not hurt. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

There have been no confirmed cases have been reported in New York , but five people are waiting for Coronavirus test results. Across the country 110 people in 26 states are being tested and there have been five confirmed cases. If you are experiencing fever, cough, or difficulty breathing and have traveled to the central Chinese region, please contact a doctor immediately. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Senator Chuck Schumer is demanding the federal government declare a state of emergency as the fifth confirmed case of the deadly coronavirus was found in the U.S. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York is the 15th most polluted city in the country. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

10 spots in the city to bring you back to relive the Roaring 20s, but without all the Diphtheria. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

RIP Jason Polan, an artist whose goal was to draw every person in NYC. I’ve long been enamored by his art and his story is one of those that I’ve always believed as one that made New York special. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The story of how mead went from the Renaissance Fair to city bars. (James Reddicliffe for NY Times)

For the second time in a week, the MTA is dealing with bed bugs at the 71st Avenue stop in Forest Hills. An exterminator crew was seen at a control tower on Monday night. (NY1)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is stepped down from the Sunnyside Yards steering committee because the city’s Economic Development Corporation is not including feedback from any of the meetings the EDC has had with the public. (Christian Murray for Jackson Heights Post)

Bernie Sanders is stuck in Washington for President Trump’s impeachment, so AOC stepped in to wow the crowds in Iowa. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Recovery has begun of the Museum of Chinese in America’s archives. Museum staff hasn’t been allowed inside the building, which suffered structural damage from the fire on Friday, but city workers are able to remove boxes from the former home of the archives. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The daily lineups of Governors Ball are available. Stevie Nicks is on Friday night. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Queens State Senator Jessica Ramos joined advocates in Albany on Monday to urge passage of a bill that would restrict how schools uses suspensions as part of an effort to end the school-to-prison pipeline. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewyork Metro)

Where to eat the city’s best fried rice dishes.(Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The Briefly for January 8, 2020 – The “Crime is Down but Murder is Up” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Is de Blasio’s common sense acutally common sense, the best restaurants, Stevie Nicks headlines Gov Ball, the NYPD ends the “which seat” meme, and more

Today – Low: 22˚ High: 42˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Te state denied a Chinatown landlord’s request to install a fingerprint scanner at the entrance in a rent-regulated building, citing privacy concerns. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There are 700 Seke language speakers on Earth, the language indigenous to Equatorial Guinea and Gabon, 100 live in NYC, and half of them live in one building.(Kimiko de Freytas-Tamura for NY Times)

Despite rises in hate crimes and murders, NYC’s crime is at an all-time low. (Emily Davenport for QNS)

A 15-year-old was charged with the murder of Juan Fresnada, 60, who was killed during a Christmas Eve mugging in Morrisania for a single dollar in the Bronx. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Even with the rise in murders as a percentage, the actual number of murders is when lower compared with past eras. (Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio says that his directed NYPD crackdown on delivery workers’ electric bikes isn’t based on data and numbers. It’s based on “common sense.” There are a lot of people whose common sense the city may trust, but Bill de Blasio ain’t on that list. 0.07% of vehicular crashes in the city, 31 in 2018, were caused by electric bike riders. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The city’s attempts to rezone Bushwick look to be at a stalemate. Bushwick’s City Councilperson Antonio Reynoso has pushed back against the city, limiting the number of new apartments he’ll consider at 2,000 and all affordable. This isn’t a new story, as Inwood successfully fought off a rezoning effort and the Sunset Park/Industry City rezoning also appears to be headed for defeat. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Everything you need to know about affordable housing: applying, getting in, and staying put. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s a seven-course VR meal, but it’s served while you wear a VR headset. This isn’t some experience in a Bushwick art studio, it’s presented by the James Beard Foundation. (Daniel Modlin for Grub Street)

Ken Friedman is leaving The Spotted Pig following an attorney general’s investigation into sexual harassment and workplace discrimination. He also agreed to pay $240,000 and 10% of his profits for the next decade to the 11 staffers who accused him of misconduct. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The Meadowlands Arena closed in 2015, but it’s still standing and found a second life as a production facility. NBC is renting out the arena through March while it films Lincoln Rhyme: Hunt for the Bone Collector where the Nets and Devils once played. (Seth Berkman for NY Times)

The last night at Tad’s Steakhouse in Times Square, one of the last vestiges of old Times Square. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The anti-war rally in Times Square. (The Villager)

After experiencing what Fifth and Sixth Avenues could be without cars or trucks, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Councilperson Keith Powers have requested a meeting to discuss keeping the traffic restrictions permanently. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

An ode to Taste of Persia, which is closing at the end of the month. (Max Falkowitz for Grub Street)

Woodland, a Park Slope bar and restaurant closed after its liquor license was revoked by the state. Woodland’s famous black brunch wasn’t enough to save it from hundreds of complaints including noice and customers urinating on the streets, a stabbing on December 22. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Governors Ball’s headliners for 2020 are Stevie Nicks, Solange, & Miley Cyrus. A full lineup is expected this week. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Paw It Forward is a non-profit that walks dogs for free for the elderly, ill, and disabled in Long Island City and is expanding to Rego Park, Forest Hills, and the West Village. (Kristen Torres for LIC Post)

Video: A narrated walk on 9th Ave from 14th to 34th. (ActionKid, YouTube)

Governor Cuomo wants to ban repeat and high-risk sexual offenders from the MTA. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork)

A minor mistake paying for a busied can cost you $100. (Elizabeth Brico for Talk Poverty)

The MTA released a map of OMNY enabled stations for January of 2020. (MTA)

The NYPD will start including hate crimes in its Compstat crime-tracking system. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Photos: The giant dogs of the Upper West Side. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

The NYPD have thoroughly ended the which seat is best meme. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you actually get mail in Greenpoint and Williamsburg, congrats on the mail you actually receive. According to a recent audit, these neighborhoods are plagued with delivery issues, including failure to secure valuable items, inadequate safety measures in residential buildings, delayed mail, and mail that never arrives. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: Three Kings Day parade in Williamsburg. (Rose Adams with photos by Caroline Ourso for Brooklyn Paper)

White supremacy posters have popped up in Bay Ridge, linked to a neo-Nazi group which was formed after the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville. Members of these groups usually attempt to stay anonymous for fear of being outed as the worst people on earth, but these geniuses uploaded a video of themselves doing a banner drop over the Belt Parkway in Bay Ridge and the NYPD is investigating. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Infatuation updated its best restaurants in NYC list with the addition of Noods n’ Chill, Bar Bête, Banty Rooster. (The Infatuation)

Noods n’ Chill is a new Thai food restaurant in Williamsburg, not just a rude suggestion on Tinder. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The Briefly for December 20, 2019 – The “Do You Know About the Secret Pet Tree?” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Inwood rezoning is killed in court, New York state’s $6 billion deficit, the city moves to kill its relationship with the Trump Organization, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 33˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 27˚ High: 42˚

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit the 1, 3, 6, A, E, F, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The story of the two menorahs claiming to be the world’s largest and why there can’t ever be a bigger menorah. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

13 places to find festive holiday decorations in the city. Do you know where to find the secret pet tree in Central Park? (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Landlords are blaming the new rent laws on why they’re cutting back on apartment renovations. Or maybe it’s because landlords are always cutting back on apartment renovations? (The Real Deal)

The fourth annual Kwanzaa crawl is happening on the 26th with stops in Harlem and Brooklyn to celebrate the city’s black-owned restaurants and bars. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Will less garbage cans in Prospect Park lead to people carrying their garbage out of the park? The Prospect Park Alliance will be trying a “carry-in, carry-out” policy modeled after the National Parks Service policy. (Colin Mixson for Brooklyn Paper)

The MTA tried a similar program for five years where garbage cans were removed form stations and riders were encouraged to carry their garbage out with them. It ended because the amount of track fires caused by trash doubled after the program was implemented. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

The MTA unveiled 68 subway stations that will be getting elevator upgrades as part of their 2020-2024 capital plan. Among the 68 are Broadway Junction, Woodhaven Boulevard, and Van Cortlandt Park-242 St. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

There are over 100 subway stations across the city where one or more entrance is “temporarily” closed, some since the 70s or 80s. Maybe it’s time to reopen some of these entrances? (Canaan Geberer for Brooklyn Eagle)

After a nine month renovation, the Astoria Boulevard stop on the N/W line reopened on Wednesday, but construction will continue as workers instal elevators, staircases, walkways, and more. (NY1)

Turns out Christmas is predicted to be warmer than average this year and more importantly, no snow. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

We will all wake up on January 1, 2020 sharing the state’s fresh $6 billion deficit. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

14 historic sites of the abolitionist movement in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Video: Meet Hannah Gavios, who completed the 2019 New York City Marathon on a pair of crutches. (Great Big Story)

Governors Ball wants to move to Van Cortlandt Park the Bronx. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Where to eat with a really big group. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Queens man impeached. (Victoria Merlino for Queens Eagle)

RIP Felix Rohatyn, “Felix the Fixer,” the man who saved NYC from financial collapse in 1975. (Bruce Nelan for Washington Post)

For a brief period of time on Thursday you could come across impeachment-themed postcards in the Trump Tower gift shop thanks to comedians Davram Steifler and Jason Selvig. They’ve done it in the past too, with Russian flags, Putin postcards, and KKK hoods. (Lee Moran for HuffPost)

For the second year in a row we are ending the year with less chain stores in the city than we started. The city overall is down 304 chains. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Terra cotta building facades have a history of disrepair and danger, from the death of Grace Gold in 1979 to this week’s death of Erica Tishman. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo’s Mother Cabrini statue has found a home in Battery Park City’s South Cove. The patron saint of immigrants will be across the harbor from the Statue of Liberty. (John Alexander for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Meet Athena Soules: The artist and co-founder of NYC Light Brigade, whose signs are shaping the image of New York’s resistance movement. (Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Eagle)

The City Council appears to be ready to flush the Trump Organization, targeting city contracts with the Trump Organization at the skating rinks in Central Park and the Trump Golf Links in the Bronx. Both locations are underperforming and losing funds for city parks. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The Heartland Brewery is on its last legs. Down to three locations, one in the Empire State Building and two in Times Square, the Empire State Building location is set to close next month with rumors of the last two locations closing following suit in 2020. (Erika Adams for Grub Street)

We better start getting used to seeing humpback whales in city waters, because they’re hanging out even in winter. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

One day people will look back at the 2019 trend of erecting plastic “igloos” outside in winter and laugh. We’re not there yet. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

It’s in violation of the city’s paid sick law to require employees to find replacements when calling out sick, but that didn’t stop Starbucks from doing that for years. A settlement with the city is forcing Starbucks to pay $150,000 in restitution. (Kate Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How Jona Rechnitz, “a liar and a felon,” became a star witness after being arrested on corruption charges. (Jan Ramson for NY Times)

The Department of Transportation is hiring seven “apprentice highway and sewer inspectors” to inspect bike lanes and review road work done by contractors. Bike team, assemble! (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

A look back at Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019, a year spent trying to convince everyone they were wrong when they said no one wanted him to run for president and eventually he learned the truth and kept pushing until he had no money left and came home. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The City Council and the mayor blew their own self-imposed deadline of the end of the year to reform the city’s property tax system. That’s politician-speak for “broken promise.” (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Speaking of blown self-imposed deadlines, it looks like the NYPD won’t actually be encrypting their radios in 2020. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

A judge nullified Inwoods rezoning, finding that the de Blasio administration “failed to take a hard look” at how the land use changes will impact the neighborhood. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Only two out of 28 yeshivas investigated by the city’s Department of Education were deemed to be providing an education “substantially equivalent“ to that given at secular public schools, according to the city’s report on the long-delayed investigation into failing yeshivas. (Madina Touré for Politico)

A straightforward guide to holiday tipping. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)