The Briefly for July 9, 2020 – The “They Don’t Call it a Subway Doomsday for Nothing” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s plan for schools in September, the worst place in NYC, wait times for Covid-19 test results slip, frozen boozy drinks, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 85˚
Humid throughout the day.

What’s the worst place in NYC? Seems there’s some consensus around Penn Station. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Despite what he may think, the president doesn’t actually have control over how the city’s schools operate. Mayor de Blasio’s plan, which is only a plan, is still subject to the state’s approval. Early August is the state’s deadline for approving or modifying the city’s plan. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s schools are facing $642 million in budget cuts. The city’s private schools received tens of millions of dollars from the federal government’s PPP program. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor announced his plan for school openings in the fall. His plans call for a partial reopening this September. Classroom attendance would be limited to one to three days a week. While it’s a burden for children, teachers, parents, the economy, and everyone involved, it’s a burden that is not worse than death, which is what his plan is hoping to prevent. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

A deeper dive into the options already presented for the city’s schools for in-person learning. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Here’s a terrifying map of what the city’s subways could look like if the MTA doesn’t get any federal assistance and uses the Riders Alliance 2010 “Doomsday on the MTA” report. To accommodate the loss in revenues, the MTA would have to cut the 1, 2, 3, 7, B, D, F, M, G, J, Z, and Franklin Avenue Shuttle. They don’t call it doomsday for nothing. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Things were already projected to be bad for the MTA, but for each tax dollar the city doesn’t collect, the MTA is pushed further and further into the economic abyss. The MTA’s projected tax revenue for 2021 will be $1.4 billion lower than expected. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The subways shut down for four hours a day and that may seem inconvenient, but a transit strike in 1966 shut the subways down for two weeks. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A Queens driver hit and killed 64-year-old Richard O’Flaherty in Far Rockaway on Tuesday. The driver was not charged. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Governors Island will reopen on July 15th for “passive recreation” from 10 am – 7 pm. You’ll need tickets in advance and they can be reserved beginning on Friday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: It used to be a school, now it’s a $22.5 million penthouse with four bedrooms, a two-level terrace, and a double-sided marble fireplace. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Why the hell is the NYPD protecting statues of Christopher Columbus across the city 24/7? (Gerch Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Someone driving an SUV drove through a crowd of protesters in Times Square, sending at least one to the hospital. The driver was taken into custody, but not arrested or charged. If the NYPD can do it with initial mayoral support and no consequences, what’s to stop a citizen from doing the same thing? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an “entirely new accountability structure” for the NYPD, including reducing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s role in overseeing the force. Under James’ recommendation, a commission of the City Council, Public Advocate, Comptroller, and the mayor would have control over the NYPD’s budget. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The development announced for the failed Amazon HQ2 site has hit a wall: City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. Without Van Bramer’s support, the project’s needed rezoning can’t happen. Long Island City’s newly constructed apartments are 60% empty. This plan would bring an additional 2,700 apartments to the area. Van Bramer’s idea for the land is simple: it’s public land and should be used by the public. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

8 tips for negotiating your lease renewal in NYC. (Localize.City)

In an article about how graffiti is on the rise during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Times starts by saying the conditions are perfect for “a new generation of graffiti writers.” The Old Gray Lady indeed. (David Gonzalez for NY Times)

The city’s oldest gay bar, Julius’ Bar, launched a GoFundMe campaign to keep the bar and it employees afloat until indoor dining comes back, which may be a while. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The availability for Covid-19 testing has increased across the city, but the availability of labs to process those tests hasn’t risen to meet the demand. As a result, wait times for test results have slipped from the three-day range to upwards of a week. Is your result still relevant if it’s been a week since the test? (Elizabeth Kim and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Where to pick up food near Central Park. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The staff at Jack the Horse in Brooklyn Heights are accusing the owners of misusing thousands of dollars in donations intended for employees. The GoFundMe states (errors and all) “We still hoping to raise money to support our wonderful staff who are out of work due to COVID-19.” The owners paid food and alcohol vendors and insurance bills with the $15,000+ of donations to the GoFundMe. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A five-story building partially collapsed in Murray Hill on E 38th in Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon. One person was injured and was brought to the hospital. (Ben Yakas and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

What’s your favorite pre-pandemic food? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A few NYC holy grail apartments: 2 bedrooms for under $2,000 a month. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

The story of how an Angela Davis quote ended up being displayed prominently towards the Barclays Center subway entrance. (Norman Oder for BKLYNER)

The Board of Elections in New York City turns Election Day into Groundhog Day—we see the same problematic deficiencies each cycle: despite a bipartisan cross-ideological desire to fix them, they reoccur like clockwork. The time has come to use the important expansion of vote-by-mail to finally fix these consistent problems.
– City Councilmember Carline Rivera, Voting by mail must be expanded to fix existing problems

Interactive Map: More than 13,000 Manhattan-based businesses secured loans of more than $150,000 from the federal government through the Paycheck Protection Program. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Major League Soccer announced the schedule for their summer tournament and NYCFC’s first game is today (Thursday) morning at 9 am. (Joe Pantorno for Bronx Times)

RIP Jane Walentas, the artist behind the three-decade restoration of Jane’s Carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

Twenty places across the city to enjoy nature. (Jenna Fanelli for Bronx Times)

The city will only retain 50 of its 95 park rangers, thanks to the city’s budget cuts. In a budget of $88.2 billion, the cuts to the park ranger program are saving $10 million, or 0.01% of the budget. (Reuven Blau for The City)

13 places to get frozen boozy drinks in Astoria. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 10, 2019 – The “A Horrifying Nightmare Trip on Columbus Ave” Edition

The tribute in lights is killing birds, $90k of stolen cake, a guide to apple picking, more details about the Charging Bull banjo attack, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

San Gennaro kicks off on Thursday, and amNY has a guide for what you need to know and what you need to eat. (amNY)

The May Room, an art installation from Shantell Martin, has taken over Our Lady Star of the Sea, the military chapel on Governors Island, through October 27. This is the first time the chapel is open to the public in twenty years. (Untapped Cities)

While the amusement area in Coney Island is larger than ever, its neighborhood storefronts are struggling with the third highest vacancy rate in Brooklyn and sixth in the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There’s a jimsonweed bush growing on the Columbus Ave greenway at the corner of 93rd St. It’s an odd pick to be planted there, as jimsonweed is highly toxic when consumed. That’s not all. The plant can be made into a powerful drug that is easy to overdose on and if you survive you’re almost guaranteed a horrifying nightmare of a hallucinogenic trip that turns its victims into “zombies devoid of free will.” Avoid the plant. (Gothamist)

Is there nothing New York won’t add alcohol to? Taco Bell, ice cream, and now bubble tea. Bubbleology opens on the 16th in the East Village (Time Out)

A guide to picking apples near the city. (Patch)

This is such a bummer I’m surprised it didn’t come from Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Tribute in Lights, which takes place for a few days every year around the anniversary of 9/11, is killing thousands and thousands of birds. It seems that birds get confused by the light during their migration periods, essentially trapping them and preventing them from having the energy to finish their trip south. Since 2006, the tribute has ruined over a million birds’ flight patterns. (Splinter)

Think about cake. Now think about a lot of cake. Now think about $90,000 of cake. That’s how much cake a deliveryman stole from Lady M in Long Island City. (LIC Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. He joins City Councilmembers Brad Lander and Antonio Reynoso with his endorsement. Do you think it’ll get awkward when de Blasio finally fails out of the race and comes back to do his job in the city? (Patch)

Restoration on the World’s Fair Observation Towers in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will begin next month. If you’ve ever been curious what’s at the top of the towers, there are some photos. (Untapped Cities)

We’re no Hawaii, but New York state is the 15th “happiest” state in the country. At least we’re not West Virginia, right? (Patch)

Good news for the asphalt area in Tompkins Square Park, which is known as the epicenter of NYC skateboard culture. The city had originally planned to turn over the area while East River Park gets rebuilt to prevent rising sea levels from destroying Manhattan, but the Parks Department has changed its plans after an outcry from the community and a rally promoted by City Councilmember Carlina Rivera. (Gothamist)

Is NYCHA ready for the next Superstorm Sandy? After the 2012 storm, nearly 80,000 residents were without electricity for weeks. Seven years later, Comptroller Scott Stringer is questioning the de Blasio administration’s preparedness. (Curbed)

More details are starting to emerge about this weekend’s banjo-wielding attack by Tevon Varlack from Dallas on the Charging Bull statue. Repairing the statue will cost around $100,000. (Gothamist)

FlyNYON is already under federal scrutiny for its fatal 2018 East River crash which left five people dead. Now it’s attracting even more negative attention for its recent promotion offering dogs a spot in its doors-off helicopter rides around lower Manhattan. (Patch)

Here are the street closures for the 9/11 ceremonies this year. (amNY)

Photos from the Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re yearning for the days of Mayor Bloomberg welcoming people into his administration with a handshake, an expectation of hard work, and a quiet “don’t fuck this up,” “The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg” may be the book for you. (Politico)

The “where are people going out right now” guide. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 30, 2019 – The “Celebrations Have Already Begun” Labor Day Weekend Edition

Holiday weekend subway changes, closed streets for J’Ouvert and West Indian Day Carnival, bringing a dead squirrel on the subway, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The first Labor Day celebration took place in Manhattan 130 years ago. (amNY)

Street closings and timings for this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival. (Curbed)

This weekend is the last big weekend for the Hailstone icehouse in Crown Heights, as they sell ice like it’s going out of style, 40 pounds at a time. (NY Times)

What’s open and closed for Labor Day weekend. (Patch)

This weekend’s weather is looking pretty comfortable. (amNY)

The change from L train shutdown to slowdown is nearly doubling the project’s cost. (Curbed)

Step inside of Sweet Afton and you’ll feel like you’re inside a Wes Anderson movie. It wouldn’t be far from the truth, because the bar’s redesign was put together by Kris Moran, set designer for Moonrise Kingdom. (Time Out)

NYCHA General Manager Vito Mustaciuolo is under investigation for harassment. An expose in the Daily News outlined his misbehavior. The NYCHA hasn’t said if he will continue working full-time while the investigation proceeds. (Patch)

It’s that time of year again: New York Fashion Week starts next weekend. (amNY)

Squirrels can be cute, but bringing a dead squirrel onto the subway is not cute. (Patch)

A look at the rejected ballots from the Katz/Cabán primary in Queens and how easily Katz’s 55-vote lead could have been easily erased. (The Indypendent)

Put Stan Lee on New York’s new license plate, you cowards! (Bronx Times)

A preview of Portal: Governors Island, an art fair which opens on Governors Island this Saturday. (Gothamist)

Where to eat and shop in Hell’s Kitchen. (amNY)

The five-day celebration of J’Ouvert has already begun. (Street Easy)

Brooklyn’s first Chick-fil-A is accused of trying to poach workers from local businesses. (Patch)

The City Council is being accused of trying to bury a public meeting about the plan to replace Rikers Island with four “community” jails by scheduling it on the hectic first day of school. (Queens Eagle)

The number of city classrooms with lead-paint hazards has doubled after a set of inspections, bringing the number to 1,858. The city says all the affected classrooms will be ready for Thursday’s first day of school. The Department of Education is supposed to inspect each classroom annually. (Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has failed to qualify for the next round of Democratic presidential debates in September. The mayor has already said he didn’t plan on dropping out of the race if he didn’t qualify. Mayor, what is so wrong with the city that you lead that you’d prefer to spend this much time away from it? (Patch)

Despite the law signed by Governor Cuomo last week barring them from state waters, the company floating billboards around Manhattan and Brooklyn’s shoreline continues to do so after finding a loophole in the language used in the law. The state has not enforced the new law with any citations. (Gothamist)

The case against Jeffrey Epstein was officially closed by a Manhattan federal judge. (Patch)

One of the hidden gems of the garment district is Acuario Cafe. How can you find it? There no signs and you can only find by walking through a freight elevator of an office building on 37th St. (Viewing NYC)

Do you know about the IFC’s secret peephole? (Bedford + Bowery)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge bike lanes make riding across the bridge easy. Getting to the bridge on a bike? Much more difficult. (amNY)

Two former NYPD Detectives who were initially accused of raping an 18-year-old woman in their custody have pleaded guilty to receiving a bribe and “official misconduct” for having sex with a teenager inside a police van after a traffic stop in Coney Island, and will only serve five years of probation. (Gothamist)

16 fantastic Filipino restaurants. (Eater)