The Briefly for September 10, 2019 – The “A Horrifying Nightmare Trip on Columbus Ave” Edition

The tribute in lights is killing birds, $90k of stolen cake, a guide to apple picking, more details about the Charging Bull banjo attack, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

San Gennaro kicks off on Thursday, and amNY has a guide for what you need to know and what you need to eat. (amNY)

The May Room, an art installation from Shantell Martin, has taken over Our Lady Star of the Sea, the military chapel on Governors Island, through October 27. This is the first time the chapel is open to the public in twenty years. (Untapped Cities)

While the amusement area in Coney Island is larger than ever, its neighborhood storefronts are struggling with the third highest vacancy rate in Brooklyn and sixth in the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There’s a jimsonweed bush growing on the Columbus Ave greenway at the corner of 93rd St. It’s an odd pick to be planted there, as jimsonweed is highly toxic when consumed. That’s not all. The plant can be made into a powerful drug that is easy to overdose on and if you survive you’re almost guaranteed a horrifying nightmare of a hallucinogenic trip that turns its victims into “zombies devoid of free will.” Avoid the plant. (Gothamist)

Is there nothing New York won’t add alcohol to? Taco Bell, ice cream, and now bubble tea. Bubbleology opens on the 16th in the East Village (Time Out)

A guide to picking apples near the city. (Patch)

This is such a bummer I’m surprised it didn’t come from Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Tribute in Lights, which takes place for a few days every year around the anniversary of 9/11, is killing thousands and thousands of birds. It seems that birds get confused by the light during their migration periods, essentially trapping them and preventing them from having the energy to finish their trip south. Since 2006, the tribute has ruined over a million birds’ flight patterns. (Splinter)

Think about cake. Now think about a lot of cake. Now think about $90,000 of cake. That’s how much cake a deliveryman stole from Lady M in Long Island City. (LIC Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. He joins City Councilmembers Brad Lander and Antonio Reynoso with his endorsement. Do you think it’ll get awkward when de Blasio finally fails out of the race and comes back to do his job in the city? (Patch)

Restoration on the World’s Fair Observation Towers in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will begin next month. If you’ve ever been curious what’s at the top of the towers, there are some photos. (Untapped Cities)

We’re no Hawaii, but New York state is the 15th “happiest” state in the country. At least we’re not West Virginia, right? (Patch)

Good news for the asphalt area in Tompkins Square Park, which is known as the epicenter of NYC skateboard culture. The city had originally planned to turn over the area while East River Park gets rebuilt to prevent rising sea levels from destroying Manhattan, but the Parks Department has changed its plans after an outcry from the community and a rally promoted by City Councilmember Carlina Rivera. (Gothamist)

Is NYCHA ready for the next Superstorm Sandy? After the 2012 storm, nearly 80,000 residents were without electricity for weeks. Seven years later, Comptroller Scott Stringer is questioning the de Blasio administration’s preparedness. (Curbed)

More details are starting to emerge about this weekend’s banjo-wielding attack by Tevon Varlack from Dallas on the Charging Bull statue. Repairing the statue will cost around $100,000. (Gothamist)

FlyNYON is already under federal scrutiny for its fatal 2018 East River crash which left five people dead. Now it’s attracting even more negative attention for its recent promotion offering dogs a spot in its doors-off helicopter rides around lower Manhattan. (Patch)

Here are the street closures for the 9/11 ceremonies this year. (amNY)

Photos from the Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re yearning for the days of Mayor Bloomberg welcoming people into his administration with a handshake, an expectation of hard work, and a quiet “don’t fuck this up,” “The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg” may be the book for you. (Politico)

The “where are people going out right now” guide. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 30, 2019 – The “Celebrations Have Already Begun” Labor Day Weekend Edition

Holiday weekend subway changes, closed streets for J’Ouvert and West Indian Day Carnival, bringing a dead squirrel on the subway, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The first Labor Day celebration took place in Manhattan 130 years ago. (amNY)

Street closings and timings for this year’s J’Ouvert festival and West Indian American Day Carnival. (Curbed)

This weekend is the last big weekend for the Hailstone icehouse in Crown Heights, as they sell ice like it’s going out of style, 40 pounds at a time. (NY Times)

What’s open and closed for Labor Day weekend. (Patch)

This weekend’s weather is looking pretty comfortable. (amNY)

The change from L train shutdown to slowdown is nearly doubling the project’s cost. (Curbed)

Step inside of Sweet Afton and you’ll feel like you’re inside a Wes Anderson movie. It wouldn’t be far from the truth, because the bar’s redesign was put together by Kris Moran, set designer for Moonrise Kingdom. (Time Out)

NYCHA General Manager Vito Mustaciuolo is under investigation for harassment. An expose in the Daily News outlined his misbehavior. The NYCHA hasn’t said if he will continue working full-time while the investigation proceeds. (Patch)

It’s that time of year again: New York Fashion Week starts next weekend. (amNY)

Squirrels can be cute, but bringing a dead squirrel onto the subway is not cute. (Patch)

A look at the rejected ballots from the Katz/Cabán primary in Queens and how easily Katz’s 55-vote lead could have been easily erased. (The Indypendent)

Put Stan Lee on New York’s new license plate, you cowards! (Bronx Times)

A preview of Portal: Governors Island, an art fair which opens on Governors Island this Saturday. (Gothamist)

Where to eat and shop in Hell’s Kitchen. (amNY)

The five-day celebration of J’Ouvert has already begun. (Street Easy)

Brooklyn’s first Chick-fil-A is accused of trying to poach workers from local businesses. (Patch)

The City Council is being accused of trying to bury a public meeting about the plan to replace Rikers Island with four “community” jails by scheduling it on the hectic first day of school. (Queens Eagle)

The number of city classrooms with lead-paint hazards has doubled after a set of inspections, bringing the number to 1,858. The city says all the affected classrooms will be ready for Thursday’s first day of school. The Department of Education is supposed to inspect each classroom annually. (Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has failed to qualify for the next round of Democratic presidential debates in September. The mayor has already said he didn’t plan on dropping out of the race if he didn’t qualify. Mayor, what is so wrong with the city that you lead that you’d prefer to spend this much time away from it? (Patch)

Despite the law signed by Governor Cuomo last week barring them from state waters, the company floating billboards around Manhattan and Brooklyn’s shoreline continues to do so after finding a loophole in the language used in the law. The state has not enforced the new law with any citations. (Gothamist)

The case against Jeffrey Epstein was officially closed by a Manhattan federal judge. (Patch)

One of the hidden gems of the garment district is Acuario Cafe. How can you find it? There no signs and you can only find by walking through a freight elevator of an office building on 37th St. (Viewing NYC)

Do you know about the IFC’s secret peephole? (Bedford + Bowery)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge bike lanes make riding across the bridge easy. Getting to the bridge on a bike? Much more difficult. (amNY)

Two former NYPD Detectives who were initially accused of raping an 18-year-old woman in their custody have pleaded guilty to receiving a bribe and “official misconduct” for having sex with a teenager inside a police van after a traffic stop in Coney Island, and will only serve five years of probation. (Gothamist)

16 fantastic Filipino restaurants. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)