The Briefly for April 12, 2019 – The “Racist If You Do, Racist If You Don’t” Edition

A hall of fame bad statement about a hit and run, Wegmans is opening this year, a gold steak, the bookmobile returns, the future of street meat, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s something you didn’t want to hear: Getting around on the subways this weekend will be more challenging than usual. (Subway Changes)

Why are there religious exemptions for vaccines? (NY Times)

A dragonstone throne will be inside the West Village Shake Shack in anticipation of Sunday’s Game of Thrones premiere. So unless you’re looking to sit on the throne, you may want to avoid that spot today. (amNY)

The city’s use of SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools was called racist. The city’s attempts to eliminate the SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools is called racist. (Politico)

A 4/20 guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The NYPL bookmobile is making a comeback this summer, with a first test in the Bronx, while the Grand Concourse Library undergoes a renovation. (amNY)

Every city borough (except Staten Island) has a higher audit rate than the rest of the state. What gives? (Patch)

17 of the 21 buildings the city is buying for $173 million are “immediately hazardous,” which includes mice and roach infestations, lead paint issues, water leaks, and broken locks. There are over 400 open violations in the buildings and the landlords are under federal investigation for tax fraud and the lawyer representing them in the sale is a de Blasio fundraiser. Weird. (The Real Deal)

Wegmans will open this fall in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. If you lived or went to college upstate, your palms are probably sweating right now. (Eater)

Ivan Nieves was found guilty of vandalizing the African Burial Ground National Monument, which happened on November 1. (NY Post)

Does the Playboy Club have a place in modern New York City? (NY Times)

The most affordable restaurants in New York, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

There have been some phenomenal F-bombs on local TV over the years, from Sue Simmons’ random outburst to Ernie Asnastos’ chicken “loving” incident. Kudos to Chris Cimino, an NBC weatherman who dropped an F-bomb on live TV at 8:15am. (NY Post)

Broadway is getting a Tina Turner musical this fall. (Time Out)

The city will no longer buy single-use plastic cups, forks, knives, spoons or plates for its agencies and the mayor has indicated he supports a ban on single-use plastic in restaurants too (read: straws), with exemptions for people with disabilities. (amNY)

As New York heads towards decriminalizing marijuana use, how it’s treated by the Administration for Children’s Services needs to change. (Gothamist)

If you’re aware of the L Project, MTA Chairperson Pay Foye says that is proof enough of the MTA’s transparency about the project. Right. (Gothamist)

P.S. 9 Teunis G. Bergen will be renamed the Sarah Smith Garnet School to remove the history associated with the Bergen family as slave-holders. Garnet was the first African-American woman to become a principal in the city. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How did the city let the Y2K GPS crash happen? Don’t ask the mayor, because he already has his excuse. “I was not involved in the planning. It was not something that came up to my level.” (NY Post)

Meet the members of Community Board 6, who will decide the fate of the Gowanus neighborhood with a rezoning vote. (Pardon Me For Asking)

How to ID the fake monks that hang around tourist hot spots. (Viewing NYC)

A permit to sell street meat costs only $300 form the city but goes for $25,000 on the black market, which is why the Councilmember Margaret Chin wants to phase in an additional 4,000 permits over 10 years. Opponents are calling for more regulation before more permits are given out. (Patch)

A literal golden steak? Yup. It’s available on Staten Island. (SI Live)

“I left because, come on, I hit a little girl, I’m going to jail.“ Just when you think we’ve hit a hall of fame bad statement about someone’s alleged part in a hit and run, Julia Litmonovich also said: “What is the big deal, it was an accident.” (NY Post)

“Why can’t white people open Chinese food restaurants?” asks your uncle, who normally reserves this kind of stuff for his Facebook page. This is why. (NY Times)

Where to go when you’re not sure its a date. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 29, 2019 – The “The Final Year of Plastic Bags in New York” Edition

Mayor de Blasio is afraid to say “bike lane,” a protest in support of Kalman Yeger’s Palestine comments, the best pancakes, where to eat in the LES, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It’s the tail end of the month and no one can escape the weekend subway closures and diversions. (6sqft)

“We’re allowed our opinions… There is no such thing as Palestine… He tweeted the truth and we came here to stand up for him.” Welcome to the protest in support of Kalman Yeger’s “Palestine doesn’t exist” comment. Kalman Yeger is on the city’s immigration committee, and that is jeopardy now. (Bklyner)

Say farewell to single-use plastic bags at retail stores. (NY Times)

Barneys is going to give up more than half of its space on Madison Ave to cut back on its $30 million annual rent. This follows Lord & Taylor jettisoning their Fifth Ave store and the complete closure of Henri Bendel. (The Real Deal)

The state’s budget is due by midnight on Sunday, can the Governor and the legislature get their priorities in order to pass it? (Gotham Gazette)

Inside Whole Foods’ new convenience store in Chelsea. (Gothamist)

Want to live a long life? Move to Queens. Queens is in the top 20 counties in the country for life expectancy. (QNS)

Brooklyn’s most endangered buildings. (Curbed)

The Upper West Side’s best pancakes. KofiMania is running wild. (I Love The Upper West Side)

Kudos to the Coney Island Polar Bear Club for raising $60,000 during their New Year’s Day swim. The money will do towards half a dozen charities in and around Coney Island. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Some people argue at work and some Amtrak employees shoot their co-worker in the leg. (Gothamist)

Can the Knicks be freed from the tyranny of James Dolan? Can we ever be free from the awfulness of his band? (Gothamist)

New York is expanding its lawsuit the Sackler family, the billionaires behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson added his voice to those calling for the abolition of the Specialized High Schools Admission Test, in addition to expanding the number of city-designated elite high schools. (Chalkbeat)

The mayor’s claim of “fewer vehicles” is hard to believe when he makes a promise to reduce the city’s fleet by 1,000 when he added over 5,000 since being elected. (NY Post)

The proposed rezoning of Gowanus will add 8,200 new apartments to the neighborhood by 2035, including 3,000 that will be below market rate. The city published a draft scope of work, a step towards a land use review. (Curbed)

How the city influenced its baseball teams. (Streeteasy)

A ride on an NYC Ferry will cost you $2.75, but it could be costing the city an additional $24.75. (amNY)

Grub Street just couldn’t help themselves. They went around and tried to order the “St. Louis Style” bagel at a number of bagel places. (Grub Street)

Why is Mayor de Blasio afraid of saying “bike lanes” when it comes to Queens Blvd? (Streetsblog)

Something else the mayor can’t seem to do is pick a new head of NYCHA by the April 6 deadline. (NY Post)

Tracy Morgan has not forgotten his Brooklyn roots and paid for a makeover to the Bed-Stuy Marcy Houses where he grew up and partnered with GrowNYC, Feeding America, and City Harvest to improve the Harrie Carthan Community Garden. (amNY)

Parents can now remove a doctor’s name from a birth certificate if their license was suspended for misconduct or abuse. (NY Post)

If you love being creeped out, you can now book an overnight stay at Madame Tussauds in Times Square. (Time Out)

Where to eat on the Lower East Side. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 28, 2019 – The “Bodega Ham, Now With Extra Plastic” Edition

Subway and bus fare is going up, the mayor punts on controlling the MTA, NYC’s James Beard Award semifinalists, NYCHA promises to find lead, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Bus and subway fares are going up on April 21. Single rides are staying put at $2.75 but weekly cards will go from $32 to $33, monthly cards will go from $121 to $127, and the bonus for putting more than $5.50 on your MetroCard is disappearing. (amNY)

You may want to avoid bodega ham for a little while. (Gothamist)

A new bill will clarify the definition of sexual harassment and strengthen the laws against it. Harassment must be “severe or pervasive” to be considered illegal at the moment. (QNS)

The barnacle Citi Bike was cute once, but stop throwing Citi Bikes into the rivers. (West Side Rag)

Ever since dropping the “Trump Soho” branding, the Dominick Hotel has seen a 20% increase in revenue. (The Real Deal)

Do not disturb? Hardly. The city’s worst hotels when it comes to noise complaints. (Localize Labs)

Daiso, the Japanese dollar store, is opening its first East coast store in the Flushing mall on March 8. (Eater)

The 18 best restaurants on the Upper West Side. (Grub Street)

Today is the last day for Raul Candy Store in Alphabet City after over 40 years. As a way to say goodbye, all the remaining candy in the store is free. (NY Post)

Even Mayor de Blasio’s wife isn’t sure he should run for president. (Patch)

The rights of students with disabilities haven’t been upheld in Success Academy, the city’s largest charter school network. (Patch)

Here’s the latest on the EPA’s Superfund cleanup of the Gowanus Canal. (Bklyner)

If you’re on Park Avenue and wondering what those giant stretched yellow rubber things are, it’s “Tension Sculptures” by Brooklyn-based artist Joseph La Piana. (NY Times)

The mayor punted on the idea of the city being in control of the MTA, handing responsibility to the governor’s office. (Streetsblog)

Horticulture at Green-Wood Cemetery is deadly serious business. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s what you should now about Jumaane Williams, the city’s new Public Advocate. (amNY)

Where are we with legalizing marijuana? The state budget deadline of April 1 is fast approaching. (amNY)

A guide to the subway’s signal system. (Curbed)

An oral history of the Sidewalk Cafe, the home of antifolk. (Gothamist)

Micaela Diamond is 19 and has become Cher 100 times. (amNY)

NYCHA promises 100 percent confidence in finding lead in its developments. Right. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez is set to announce his support in giving undocumented immigrants driver’s licenses. (NY Post)

Can you help catch whoever stole Luna, the beloved two-month old bodega cat from Ismael’s Gourmet Deli in the Bronx? (News 12)

NYCs 2019 James Beard Awards semifinalists. (Eater)

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