The Briefly for September 25-26, 2020 – The “Now You Annoyed the Anarchists” Friday Edition

Friday’s NYC news digest: The growing Covid-19 cluster neighborhoods, restaurant reviews return with no stars, Corey Johnson steps away from the mayoral race, and more

Today – Low: 66˚ High: 78˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 69˚ High: 76˚

10 big differences between fall in NYC this year vs. last year.” I bet I could think of at least one of them. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If we raise taxes on New Yorkers making more than a million a year, are they really gonna turn tail and leave? While the governor says he won’t raise their taxes for that very reason, he hasn’t shown any evidence that’s the case. Millionaires aren’t gonna choose to move to Hoboken because their taxes are high. That’s nobody’s first choice. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Even anarchists are annoyed that New York City was designated an anarchist jurisdiction. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Apartment Porn: This 5,500 square foot home in Brooklyn Heights is stunning, complete with a rooftop yoga studio, garden, and an indoor pool. For $8 million, it better be! (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Two Sunset Park meat purveyors face up to 20 years behind bars for pasting fake labels on their low-grade beef products to inflate their prices. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

After 21 years, the Amish Market in Tribeca is closing. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Brooklyn Municipal Building (I was married in that building) will be named after Ruth Bader Ginsberg. (NY1)

“Advocates for the LaGuardia AirTrain such as Gov. Cuomo and Port Authority Executive Director Rick Cotton promise a 30-minute or less connection from LaGuardia Airport to Manhattan via the AirTrain. It’s a myth.”
-Larry Penner, transportation advocate and historian, The Myth of the 30-Minute, One-Seat Ride on the LGA AirTrain for Streetsblog

The Times’ Pete Wells is back to writing restaurant reviews, but without any stars. This is similar to The Infatuation, who dropped its rating system while we’re in the end times. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Next week, the City Council will take up new legislation to potentially make outdoor dining permanent. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Did you know that NYC has a fruit-filled Instagram bakery scene? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Najhim Luke was indicted on second-degree murder and additional charges in the death of Brandon Hendricks, a 17-year-old high school basketball player who was shot in the Bronx by a stray bullet on June 28, 2020. (Norwood News)

According to a lawsuit, a CUNY graduate alleges that she was suspended after City Council Majority Leader Laurie Cumbo intervened in response to the student’s protest against Cumbo at a community board meeting last year. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

How many times have we said that the Industry City rezoning plan is dead? This time it’s actually dead. The developers have pulled their proposal. (Greg David The City)

The history of how the Industry City rezoning completely fell apart. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The MTA is looking to ban pooping on the subway. Does this mean that pooping on the subway is not currently banned? (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Responding to a tip in February 2019, the MTA discovered a a “man cave” was discovered underneath Grand Central Terminal, complete with couch, fridge, and TV. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A look at The Elevated Acre, a little patch of (fake) grass overlooking the water in the Financial District. (Marianne Howard for Untapped New York)

The Met Opera canceled its spring season. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

There have been Covid-19 cases in 100 NYC school buildings. (Charon Otterman for NY Times)

Two yeshivas will shut down amid a coronavirus spike in several neighborhoods in southern Brooklyn. (NY1)

Congrats to Borough Park, Far Rockaway, Flatbush, Kew Gardens, Midwood, and Williamsburg, the six neighborhoods the city will be focusing a “hyper-local effort” to increase testing and outreach to fight Covid-19. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“The ship has sailed. We’re headed toward another super spreading event.” Life in a Borough Park. (Jake Offenbartz for Gothamist)

“Last week, the New York City Council announced that it had passed a new bill allowing restaurants to add a COVID surcharge of 10 percent. The law will stay in place until 90 days after indoor dining is brought back to full capacity, but like so much else done over the past six months, it’s a gesture of help that does too little.”
-Chris Crowley, The COVID Recovery Surcharge Is a Farce for Grub Street

It’s not illegal to not wear a helmet while riding a bike in the city. Someone should tell these Barney Fifes who ticketed a cyclist for not wearing a helmet after being hit by a car. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The number of women running for the state Legislature has hit an all-time high, shattering the record set just two years ago. Good. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

The Gowanus Canal dredging is going to start mid-November. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

When’s the EPA’s cleanup of the Gowanus going to be finished? At least another dozen years. (Kevin Duggan for Brownstoner)

Eric Trump, the human toothpaste and orange juice combo, must testify in the state’s probe into the Trump Organization before the election on October 7. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Here is why Corey Johnson dropped out of the mayor’s race. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Video: The Krispy Kreme glaze waterfall in Time Square. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Governo Cuomo is back to what he’s doing best, talking shit about Mayor de Blasio’s inaction. This time, it’s focused on NYC being the only jurisdiction in the state that hasn’t started a mandated community dialogue on public safety. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

You knew it was coming: New Years Eve in Times Square is canceled. (Bill Pearls for BrooklynVegan)

15 exciting restaurants in Brooklyn open for outdoor dining. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 1, 2020 – The “A $3.75 Reduced-Service Subway Ride” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest with school openings, the mayor wants a vaccine before indoor dining returns, where to eat outside in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 78˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

Today (Sept 1), the United Federation of Teachers’ executive board will meet to vote to authorize a strike at 3:30 pm. From a friend, I’ve heard the teachers will push for an October opening of school for in-person instruction. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Looking to make a temporary change in your address? The Times has some service journalism for you to make sure your mail gets delivered. (A.C. Shilton for NY Times)

Free bus rides are over. Front boarding started on Monday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A bus or subway fare could be raised a dollar, as hinted by MTA officials, paired with a 40% reduction in service, in an attempt to close the $9 billion gap in the MTA’s budget. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

Five cheap ways to improve the subway from a policy analyst from the Manhattan Institute. Not all of these ideas are good. (Connor Harris for Streetsblog)

There is no combination of state efforts that can address New York’s financial crisis. The full damage that the Covid-19 virus has laid upon New York state is $59 billion, meaning there is no possible way the state can tax its way out of this hole. Watch this argument carefully, because Governor Cuomo will use this to defend his decision to never increase taxes on the state’s super-rich. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state kicked the can down the road, but October 1 is the new date for the tidal wave of evictions when the moratorium ends. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The mayor created his own deadline of October 1 to either cut one billion from the city’s costs from labor or he would fire 22,000 municipal employees. On Monday, the day city employees were ready to hear about who was “at-risk” for being fired, the mayor announced that unions have asked for more time to resolve the issue. The sword of Damocles still hangs. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

September 1 gives us two months left of outdoor dining in NYC. As bars and restaurants look ahead, the question becomes “How do we survive this?” A spotlight on Jeremy’s Ale House, who doesn’t see past Halloween, unless people are allowed inside. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The biggest question looming over the city might not be “when will The Briefly return to five days a week?,” but “when is indoor dining coming back?” The mayor’s answer seems to change every day. In the last week, he’s said that the school openings would dictate it, that it wouldn’t return until the new year, and now until we see a vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How much is a life worth? Layleen Polanco’s family was awarded $5.9 million after her death after nine days in solitary confinement at Rikers Island while being held on $500 bail, a record for an inmate’s death. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The NYPD has issued a “discipline penalty matrix” that outlines specific punishments for instances of police misconduct. This isn’t in response to recent violence from the NYPD against the citizens it is supposed to protect, but form the recommendation of a 2018 independent panel. Despite the matrix, the NYPD Commissioner has the ability to ignore the matrix. The NYCLU says this is no reason to celebrate because it doesn’t show a culture of change in the NYPD and Commissioner Shea and Mayor de Blasio’s comments appear to be on the side of protecting police officers. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A 2017 NYPD “challenge coin” from East Flatbush is so racist you may have to see it to believe it that celebrates the “hunting of man” and features a caricature of a black man with dreadlocks with the shadow of a deer. (Jon Campbell for Gothamist)

Riis Park’s popularity in the last few years partially has Riis Park Beach Bazaar to thank. The lease for Riis Park Beach Bazaar is up and won’t be renewed. Instead, they have been invited to submit a proposal to compete with other vendors. (The Rockaway Times)

This is what life is like when you’re quarantined in an apartment with Miss Universe and Miss USA. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Gyms in the city will be virtually inspected before reopening on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Yeah, you’ve been to Governors Island, but have you been to the haunted basketball court on Governors Island? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Sutphin Blvd-Archer Ave. and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer E train stations will be closed from September 19 through November as the MTA replaces 5,500 feet of track and more than 7,800 feet of third rail. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s pronounced “How-stun.” Here’s why. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

One of the three lawsuits blocking the Two Bridges megadevelopment was reversed, but it’s still not a green light to move forward. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s land use review process comes back mid-month, which will mean Gowanus will become the epicenter of the fight over redevelopment in the city. (Amy Plitt for BKLYNER)

“The fight against Industry City has implications beyond the neighborhood. It has implications for any of us who see the city as a site of civic engagement, as a place where community thrives. It’s community, the very idea of it, that’s destroyed, as the privatization of neighborhoods grows bolder and less restrained.”
– Peter Rugh, Sunset Park is Afraid of Industry City’s Expansion, The Rest of Us Should Be Too for The Indypendent

The Mermaid Inn in the East Village is closing. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at waacking and its history from dance clubs in the city in the 70s and how it ended up as a Tik Tok sensation. (Ted Alcorn, video by Mohamed Sadek for NY Times)

Columbia University removed “pretty significant” slave owner Samuel Bard’s name from Bard Hall, with a promise to rename the building in the fall. (Amanda Rosa for NY Times)

Why was a statue of Christopher Columbus and the green space surrounding it in the Bronx’s Little Italy locked up? The Parks Department says it was a staff error. The statue has been protected by the NYPD since June. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Former Queens DA hopeful Tiffany Cabán is expected to run for City Council in Astoria when Costa Constantinides’s term limit is up in 2021. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Where to eat out on Staten Island. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining, I Don’t Know Her” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A look at the state of bars and restaurants vs the SLA, where we stand with the start of NYC’s school year, great spots buffalo wings, & more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 86˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚

Try not to roll your eyes, but here’s the big “New York is dead. Here’s why” link. Try to prevent your eyes from rolling all the way out of your head when reading this dipshit’s thinly veiled “Why I’m Leaving New York” essay. (James Altucher)

“Listening to him go, “I used to play chess all day. I could meet people. I could start any type of business.” Wipe your tears, wipe your butt and pull it together. He says he knows people who have left New York for Maine, Vermont, Tennessee, Indiana. I have been to all of these places many, many, many times over many decades. And with all due respect and affection, Are .. You .. Kidding .. Me?!”
-Jerry Seinfeld, So You Think New York Is ‘Dead’ for NY Times

The city’s school will have the option to hold classes outdoors in yards, nearby streets, or parks. PTAs will be responsible for fundraising for supplies and equipment for schools to hold classes outdoors. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

“Chinatown is very traditional, almost to a fault, where we’ve let our elders take over. And we need to learn from our elders, but young people need to be making decisions now, and move Chinatown further. And seeing people like Patrick Mock start standing up and speaking out on the injustices we’ve suffered, it gives us a hope for the future.” -Conversations with politicians, business owners, and locals about the future of Chinatown. (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James asked a judge to order Eric Trump to testify in the state’s inquiry into possible fraud committed by the Trump Organization and President Trump. (William K. Rashbaum and Danny Hakim for NY Times)

NYPD officer Kyle Erickson has been twice accused of planting marijuana during traffic stops on Staten Island and despite bodycam footage to prove he did it, he was cleared of any wrongdoing. Just a sample of the 4,000 pages of documents released by the Staten Island District Attorney’s office about NYPD officers’ dishonesty and (lack) of discipline. (George Joseph and Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Restaurants have been closing, but not failing. An argument for why the distinction matters. (Talia Saxe for Eater)

A series of bars and restaurants sued the SLA this week to roll back their recent rule change that barred live music ticketed events, and other forms of outdoor entertainment. Disclosure: The lawsuit includes Littlefield, where I was hosting trivia all summer on Wednesdays. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

More than 20 state senators are calling on the State Liquor Authority to ease up on their restaurant and bar crackdown. Since mid-June, the SLA conducted over 41,000 checks, 165 businesses lost their liquor licenses temporarily, and 886 were charged with violations. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The City Council voted to extend the 20% commission cap on delivery fees for restaurants until 90 days after they are allowed to operate at full capacity with indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

And when will indoor dining return? The mayor says that depends on how our return to schools goes on September 10. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Although he also hinted that 2021 was a possibility for a return to indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

What’s the return to schools look like? A friend of mine who’s a teacher in the city told me they are getting ready to strike, but in the meantime the city has to inspect 1,700 public schools housed in 1,300 buildings by September 1 with plans to release a report on September 4. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Of the city’s 1,700 schools, 1,030 of them had some kind of documented problem with air supply or exhaust components. Chalkbeat compiled the most recent inspection reports publicly available for each school. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

An additional 30,000 students opted out of any in-person classes this year, bringing the total to 337,394 students that will not step inside a school this school year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Reopening day at the New York Aquarium. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

This Saturday is the reimagined Coney Island Mermaid Parade. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

This Sunday is the MTV Video Music Awards that Governor Cuomo announced back in June. MTV built a stage in Greenpoint instead of using the Barclay Center, citing that an outdoor event without an audience would be safer than an indoor one. Performers will be getting an exemption from the state’s 14-day mandatory quarantine. (Greenpointers)

According to the mayor, 20% of the city’s new Cobid-19 patients are linked to travelers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

US and UK authorities are discussing an “air bridge” exemption from quarantine for travel between New York and London. (Payton Potter for Patch)

With a filing for bankruptcy back in May, the future of the John Varvatos shop in the old home of CBGB might be in jeopardy. Which camp are you in when it comes to John Varvatos replacing CBGB? “At least it’s not a Duane Reade” or “Who cares, let it die?” (EV Grieve)

Revel’s electric mopeds relaunched with new safety protocols. Not sure how I feel about sending the company a selfie of me wearing one of their helmets. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Unmown lawns, unemptied garbage cans, and littered playgrounds. Welcome to the city’s parks when the city needs them the most. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

An engagement while canoeing on the Gowanus Canal: Doomed or beautiful? (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Do you know who makes the decision to return the subway back to 24/7 service? No, seriously, no one seems to know. The governor says to ask the MTA Chairman. The MTA Chairman says to ask the health commissioner. Can I declare the subways open 24/7 again? I hereby declare the subways open 24/7! Did it work? (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Photos: King Nyani, the city’s largest bronze gorilla statue, which can hold 2 or 3 people at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

Everything you need to know about living in a first-floor apartment. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Front-door boarding of city buses returns on Monday and so do fares on buses. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

The Mets and Marlins walked off the field after a moment of silence for 42 seconds with a Black Lives Matter t-shirt draped over home plate. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The assholes of the week are “The Illmore,” which has reportedly hosting secret indoor parties since June. The Illmore is, of course, in Bushwick. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Second place goes to Beavis and Butthead over here: Crime in NYC is near an all-time low, historically speaking, which is why former mayor Rudy Giuliani and current Police Benevolent Association president Pat Lynch were at the RNC calling crime in NYC a “public safety disaster.” Murders in NYC in 2019 were down about 50% from Rudy Giuliani’s last year in office. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Six great buffalo wings in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helena for today’s featured photo.