The Briefly for August 28, 2019 – The “Signs of a Wegmans Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

The growth in the car population is outpacing the growth of the actual population, the best floor in a walk-up, taking a wallaby for a walk, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All the street closings and timing of the West Indian Day Parade and all the associated events over Labor Day weekend. (Curbed)

An Andy Warhol tour and map of Manhattan from artist Patricia Fernández. (Untapped Cities)

Five takeaways from the plan to scrap the city’s gifted school programs. Will Mayor de Blasio follow the recommendation from the task force he assembled or will he try to run out the clock as he did with Eric Garner’s death? (NY Times)

It’s getting real. Signs are going up at the home of the future Brooklyn Wegmans. (Brownstoner)

Does it seem odd to anyone else that the mayor is supporting restrictions to hotel development after receiving support and campaign contributions from the hotel industry union? (6sqft)

The Mast Brothers are out of Brooklyn, doing the hipster move from Williamsburg to upstate. (Eater)

Every neighborhood has its old-school spots that have been there for decades, and many of them are endangered. Two Toms in Gowanus has been family owned since 1948, but the building the restaurant is in is for sale and the listing says it could be delivered vacant “if necessary.” (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The growth of the number of cars in the city is outpacing the growth of the city’s population. (Streetsblog)

The city is full of hidden history. Sometimes that history is a poster from 2000 for the movie Road Trip. (Gothamist)

In praise of the Manhattan dive bar: Cheap beer and good atmosphere are increasingly hard to find, but it’s out there. (amNY)

A worker was killed and five injured in a partial building collapse in Norwood in the Bronx. (Metro)

A wall in Chinatown with messages of support for the protests in Hong Kong has been vandalized twice in less than a week. Global politics are also local politics. (Gothamist)

What’s the best floor to live on in a six-floor walk-up? (Street Easy)

Jeffrey Epstein’s victims will never have their full day in court, but they have vowed to not stop fighting. (Gothamist)

The family of Eric Garner filed a judicial inquiry of Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill to answer questions about their handling of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the NYPD. (Politico)

Leslie Jones is not returning to SNL. (Gothamist)

Video: Nothing to see here here, just a man walking taking his pet wallaby for a walk. Nope, this was in Bed-Stuy, not Bushwick. (Patch)

The total population in the city’s jails has fallen 23% from 2014, but the population jailed for parole violations increased by 20% in the same period, with the average stay lasting 60 days while they wait for parole court dates. (Gothamist)

Seven acres under the new Kosciuszko Bridge in Greenpoint will be made into a park. There’s no proposed opening date and construction has not begun. The project will be lead by the North Brooklyn Parks Alliance. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Conservative Times Op-Ed columnist and climate change denier Bret Stephens quit Twitter because someone called him a “bedbug.” Poor Bret. (Gothamist)

Video: It’ll take more than It’s Pennywise the clown to rattle New Yorkers riding the L late at night. (Patch)

28 of the best sports bars in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for June 26, 2019 – The “The Triboro: Here Comes A New Subway Line” Edition

Rental reforms, Cardi B faces felony charges, the Central Park squirrel census, WorldPride begins, the new I Voted stickers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at changes to the rental laws for everyone. Security deposits are limited to one month’s rent and landlords have 14 days to return them once you’ve moved out, application fees are limited to $20 (even with a background check), and more. (StreetEasy)

A look at how subway delays are tied to the city’s homeless crisis the city is currently facing. In the first three months of 2019, there was nearly the same number of train delays related to the homeless as there was in all of 2014. (NY Times)

Manhattan post-work bar picks. (amNY)

The Triboro is an idea for a new subway line that would start in the Bronx, stop in Randall’s Island, head down through Astoria, cut through Ridgewood and cut through the southern parts of Brooklyn down to Bay Ridge and possibly continue on to the St. George, where the Staten Island Ferry terminates. While it sounds like a fantasy, the proposed cost is less than half of the Second Avenue subway, would connect 17 different subway lines along the route. A bill was introduced by Latrice Walker to the state assembly that would require the MTA to conduct a feasibility study. (Welcome2TheBronx)

How to spend 10 hours in Greenpoint. (Brooklyn Based)

Louis CK continues to have problems with consent when it comes to the venues he performs in. Brooklyn Bazaar released an apology after the masturbating-into-a-plant-while-blocking-the-door comedian appeared at a rental event as a “surprise.” (BrooklynVegan)

The MTA may never make your commute smoother, but a change in perspective and a decent amount of patience can go a long way, which is what author Reny Amoros set out to do in ‘7 Life Lessons the NYC Subway Unintentionally Taught Me.’ (Reny Amoros)

Video: Capturing the ‘Beyond the Streets’ graffiti and street art exhibit in one minute by Chop ‘Em Down Films. (Brooklyn Street Art)

Passive-aggressive notes never go far in NYC, and the one Nobletree Coffee left as a reason for their closing faired just as well. After they tried to blame low foot traffic in the neighborhood, their note was met with another accusing them of having mediocre coffee and bad service. (Eater)

As Gowanus’ rezoning hangs over the neighborhood like the sword of Damaclese, the Landmarks Preservation Commission put five buildings in the neighborhood into consideration for landmark status. (Curbed)

The city’s schools are coming up short when it comes to room for special education children in pre-Kindergarten. At the low end, the city is 200 seats short, but program closures put the number closer to 300. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Harbir Parmar was sentenced to three years in prison for kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman who was supposed to be his Uber fare. He also charged her over $1,000 for the trip and for that he plead guilty of wire fraud. (Gothamist)

A list of places for tourists to go (none of them are “straight to hell) during WorldPride. (NY Times)

These new “I Voted” stickers are boring compared to the subway-themed stickers. (Gothamist)

The first of three ASPCA low-cost vet centers will be built in East New York and is expected to open next year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Whoops. Looks like Cardi B will be facing 14 total charges, including felonies, a big difference from the two misdemeanors she previously faced for the incident. (Gothamist)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District, which consists of 54 row houses constructed between 1906 and 1913. (Curbed)

Feltman’s was the original Coney Island hot dog. For two years a revival of the brand was available in Coney Island, but the operators of Luna Park gave Feltman’s the boot following a series of broken promises from Luna Park. The hot dogs are available elsewhere, but no longer in Coney Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Stranger Things will be taking over the Wonder Wheel (which is not a part of Luna Park) On July 4 and through the weekend as a prelude to Stranger Things season 3, Scoops Ahoy will be selling ice cream, ad the July 4 fireworks will be a special Hawkins Fourth of July Spectacular. (amNY)

Desmond Amofah, a YouTube star who went by Etika, went missing last week was found dead in the East River at the age of 29. (Gothamist)

Is there anything our current president’s administration can’t ruin? On the verge of WorldPride the news came out that the federal government “gifted” a flagpole and LGBT pride flag the NYC Parks Department so it wouldn’t have to appear in a national park. As a result, the NYC Parks Department permanently owns the flagpole. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority, who recently complained that Manhattan’s congestion pricing would be financially unfair to people who use its bridges and tunnels, is looking to raise the price of tolls system-wide and place new tolls on Uber and Lyft drivers accessing any of the area’s airports. The board will vote on it in September. (Politico)

The 2019 Central Park Squirrel Census Report is in! There are 2,373 squirrels that live in Central Park. If you really love squirrels or well-designed products, you can also purchase the Census in book form. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A trip to (and photos from) the Department of Sanitation’s Museum of Trash. (Gothamist)

The everything bagel is everything. Sesame and poppy seeds, accompanied by dried garlic, onion, and salt: Anything else, in addition, is against the law( or it should be). Now that we’ve established that the everything bagel is king of the bagels, who invented the combination? Does the lineage go back further than 1979 at Charlie’s Bagels in Howard Beach? (Atlas Obscura)

Photos from the start of WorldPride. (NY Times)

Facebook is looking at a one million-square-foot lease at 50 Hudson Yards. No public announcement, no massive tax breaks, no helicopter pad on the roof. (The Real Deal)

The Broadway show King Kong announced it will be closing in August after disappointing reviews and ticket sales. (NY Times)

20 of the city’s tastiest and quirkiest ice cream shops. (6sqft)

The mayor’s office lobbied, against a change in the city’s charter aimed at allowing the Civilian Complaint Review Board to prosecute discipline charges when police officers lie during an investigation of misconduct. The mayor’s argument is that the current system works fine. (Gotham Gazette)

Do the police belong at Pride? (NY Times)

21 top restaurants in Flatiron and Gramercy. (Eater)