The Briefly for September 5, 2019 – The “Summer Vacation is Ending for the Mayor” Edition

More L train changes announced, stop dropping your AirPods on the subway tracks, renaming the city for women, a mystery tomato grows, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Since firing NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo for his illegal chokehold that lead to the death of Eric Garner, there has been a decline in arrests and summonses all across the city. (amNY)

Summer break is over for the city’s students but concerns about lead paint in classrooms is still going strong. (Gothamist)

The city’s new speed cameras turn on this week from 6 am to 10 pm. Cameras are located within a quarter-mile of the city’s 1,840 public schools and tickets will cost $50. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

No matter what the city eventually decides to do about the gifted and talented programs, New York City Chancellor Richard Carranza has said not to expect any changes this year. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

May de Blasio might drop out of the presidential race if he doesn’t qualify for the fourth debate. We may get a full-time mayor back on October 1. (NY Times)

Maybe de Blasio is better being a part-time mayor if his full-time thoughts would include considering requiring licenses for bike riders. (Streetsblog)

Video: The secrets of Grand Central Terminal. (Viewing NYC)

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Friends, a terrible TV show, Warner Brothers Television is putting 30 replicas of the orange couch around the country, including multiple NYC locations. (amNY)

Warner Brothers attempted to put a couch in Greenwich Village, theoretical home to the irredeemable idiots on the show, but Community Board 2 said no. (Gothamist)

The city could see remnants of Hurricane Dorian on Friday with heavy rain and wind. (Patch)

Stop dropping your AirPods onto the subway tracks. The MTA is tired of retrieving them. (Gothamist)

How did a tomato end up growing out of a piling near the Brooklyn Bridge? (Gothamist)

Tax policy gave us the summer of spiked seltzer. (Grub Street)

What if the city’s subway stops were all named for women? That’s the idea behind the City of Women map, currently on display at the Transit Museum. Would naming a subway stop after Lena Dunham be worse than naming one after Peter Schermerhorn, who was best known for owning a rope factory? (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The elevators in NYCHA buildings are constantly breaking down, which makes sense once you understand the budget to fix them is $74 million, which falls short of the needed $1.5 billion. (Curbed)

Video: Meet the city’s “Mother Pigeon,” performance artist Tina Piña Trachtenburg. (Video NYC)

A walking tour of 1949 Greenwich Village. (Curbed)

The MTA announced how it plans to make L train service worse on nights and weekends as it continues its L Train Slowdown work. These changes are to make accommodation for elevator and escalator construction. (Gothamist)

A look at where we are with the mayor’s $8.7 billion plan to replace Rikers Island with four community jails. (NY Times)

The 15 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall, according to Eater. (Eater)

Thanks to Chris for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)