The Briefly for April 30, 2019 – The “Luxury Living in a Toxic Waste Flood Zone” Edition

A gun buyback program in Queens, the NYPD strays from following the law, the new Airbnb/office building hybrid takes Rockefeller Center, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Borough President Melinda Katz put forward a plan to address Queens’ gun violence, including a 24/7 gun buyback program and new education programs. We’re two weeks from the primary for the Queens District Attorney and Katz is a candidate. (QNS)

The allergy forecast continues to be at “high” or “very High” without a sign of “moderate” in sight. Stay indoors. (Patch)

The 6 oldest buildings in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

30-story buildings on toxic waste sites that are in flood zones. Welcome to the Gowanus rezoning. (Curbed)

Another hidden tax. Restaurants have begun charging customers fees for paying with a credit card. (MarketWatch)

Photos from Sakura Matsuri Cherry Blossom festival at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Gothamist)

Watch a time-lapse of the Goethals Bridge construction. (EarthCam)

Sounds like no one like Rhode Island style “pizza.” (Eater)

Welcome to the neighborhoods in the city with seven playgrounds for every 10,000 kids, the playground deserts. (Patch)

10 stories of a 33 story office building in Rockefeller Center will be converted from offices to Airbnbs. This is one of a few office/hotel hybrids coming to the city. (Curbed)

Take a historic tour of the 2,200 buildings of Greenwich Village, 50 years after it was given landmark designation. (6sqft)

Seems like The Palm is the new Spotted Pig. The chain is accused multiple times over of nurturing an atmosphere of sexual harassment. The restaurant’s attorney denies the claims. (Eater)

The story of how McGuinness Blvd became McGuinness Blvd, from its start as the cobblestone Oakland Street. (Greenpointers)

AOC had her first town hall, fielding questions about the Green New Deal and Amazon HQ2. (QNS)

Legal Aid is suing the city in an attempt to get the NYPD to actually follow the law and stop penalizing workers who use electric bikes for deliveries. (Gothamist)

The big boards at Grand Central Terminal are going all digital and it’s hard not to see that as a loss, no matter how convenient the upgrade may be. (Gothamist)

Uber and Lyft’s explosive growth in the city has stopped on a dime, as neither are hiring new drivers. The city’s pay regulations appear to be having the intended effect. Since the $17.22 minimum wage for drivers went into effect, drivers have earned $56 million more than they would have otherwise. (Politico)

The B39 bus gets the New York Times profile treatment. (New York Times)

Six of the season's best neighborhood food festivals. (6sqft)

Everything new you need to know about camping on Governors Island. (Time Out)

“IT WAS PROFISIZED [sic] IN THE LATE 20th CENTURY. AN Angel OF DEATH SHALL WASTE THIS PLACE. NOW I ASK YOU DO YOU BELIEVE IT TO BE TRUE?….THE DOCTOR.” No one asked for this on their mozzarella cheese packaging. (Gothamist)

“By entering these premises you agree not to run for President of the United States in 2020 or in any future presidential race,” says the signs at the YMCA that Mayor de Blasio visits to work out. Not all heroes wear capes. (Patch)

Early voting is likely coming to NYC. The mayor proposed 100 early voting sites for the 2019 general election, the 2020 presidential primary, and the 2020 June primary. (amNY)

The Right to Know Act went into effect in October, which mandated that NYPD officers give business cards to people they stop and ask permission to perform stop and frisk searches. According to the Justice Committee, they haven’t been doing either. (Patch)

The MTA’s express buses are no longer accept cash, but without the OMNY system and without MetroCard machines at express bus stops, some New Yorkers are feeling their commutes threatened. While less than 1% of people use cash, that 1% likely depend on it for their ability to pay the $6.75 fare. (Gothamist)

The five best burritos in New York this week. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for March 11, 2019 – The “We Have A Rabid Trash Panda Problem” Edition

Jumaane Williams is and is not the Public Advocate, Hanksy meets Hanks, the best walk-in restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The prep-work on the L train tunnel ends this week. Here are the late night subway changes this week. (Subway Changes)

Ida Elionsky, the first woman to swim around the island of Manhattan, will be inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame. (amNY)

What a wild year of the city’s raccoons. Rabid raccoons were discovered in Manhattan for the first time in eight years. Be careful around Inwood Park. (NY Post)

When Hanksy met Tom Hanks. (Bowery Boogie)

No matter how much you are annoyed by a subway conductor telling you to stop holding the doors open, it’s no reason to punch them. (Gothamist)

They were filthy and full of filth flies, roaches, mice, and who knows what else. A look back at the restaurants closed by the Department of Health last week. (Patch)

New York is one of only one of eight states that uses fusion voting, which is the practice of multiple parties having one candidate. Why are the state’s democrats trying to kill it? (Gothamist)

Watch local hero Jeff Seal attempt to clean a subway station. (Gothamist)

After over 30 years, both Sushiden locations appear to be closed. (Eater)

This month marks the 20th “Mr. Lower East Side Pageant,” hosted by Reverend Jen, the curator of the Troll Museum. (Bowery Boogie)

7 city landmarks you didn’t know were designed by women. (Curbed)

Congratulations on five years of Tinder Live, which is as much of a comedy show as Tinder itself. (Bedford + Bowery)

The clock at the center of Grand Central Terminal is worth enough to make a heist movie about trying to steal it. (6sqft)

Conor McGregor completed his court mandated community service for his attack on a UFC van after a press event. The community service included five days of manual labor at two Brooklyn Churches. (NY Post)

Good Records NYC is closing, but that isn’t the end of a record shop at that address. (EV Grieve)

What’s not to love about living in New York City? The slow-walking tourists? The constantly reading small businesses going way to national chains? Or maybe it’s the people who occasionally spray crowds of people with unknown chemicals. (West Side Rag)

Jumaane Williams is the Schrödinger’s Cat of the city’s Public Advocate position. He hasn’t resigned from his position on the city council, which is necessary for him to legally hold his elected office. (Patch)

11 Notorious B.I.G. landmarks in NYC. (StreetEasy)

If you thought the Amazon tax incentives were big, wait til you get a load of the Hudson Yard incentives. (NY Times)

The national Transit Workers Union is spending hundreds of thousands of dollars mocking Mayor Bill de Blasio as a “fauxgressive” as he traipses around the country pretending like he isn’t planning a 2020 presidential bid. (NY Post)

If you don’t have a Girl Scout in your life, or a Girl Scout parent in your office, a Girl Scout cookie pop-up shop is now open. (Time Out)

The city’s dockless bike-sharing program was extended three months for “further evaluation.” Don’t throw these bikes in the river. Don’t do it. (Patch)

This is the reason that West Village denizens are worried about the new owner of the White Horse Tavern. (Gothamist)

The best walk-in only restaurants when you didn’t make a reservation. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for February 7, 2019 – The “Wait, What is a Pizza Sauna?” Edition

The Public Advocate debate, the porta-potty king, a rooftop glamping sauna, the NYPD targets Waze, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Watch the full Public Advocate debate or read the live blog. (NY1)

Amazon HQ2 was the common punching bag during the debate. (NY Post)

At 115 years, Maspeth’s Grant Street Bridge is ready for a makeover. (QNS)

The MTA’s 24% accessibility at subway stations should be embarrassing enough before the truth comes out about how those numbers are inflated. The subways are planned to be fully accessible by 2034 at a cost of $40 to $60 billion. (Curbed)

The BQX is taking a baby step forward. The city’s Economic Development Corporation is expected to approve a contract that will allow an environmental review. It’s only the first step of a $2.73 billion plan, which is what you might call “one full Amazon.” (Curbed)

This profile of the porta-potty king of New York City is full of crappy puns. (NY Mag)

The best bagels in Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

“Yes, I broke your window because Barack Obama was talking to me and I didn’t like what he was saying.” A perfectly understandable excuse for breaking the window of a Harlem adult shop. (Gothamist)

Lincoln Center has a new president. Henry Timms, who helped create #GivingTuesday, will leave the 92nd Street Y to take the position. (NY Times)

Releasing a banner buoyed by balloons into Grand Central Terminal is a pretty good way to make sure your protest can’t be easily removed. (Gothamist)

Waze is about to get less useful thanks to an . (NY Post)

Google to the NYPD: No thanks. (amNY)

The city is getting a pizza sauna. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The BronxCare Health System will repay sexual assault patients for illegally billing them for rape exams after settling a lawsuit by the NYAG’s office. (amNY)

The state legislature is looking to raise the prison minimum wage to $3/hour. Inmates work six hours a day, five days a week between $0.10 to $1.14/hour. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Pizza sauna not your thing? You could spend time in a sauna while glamping on the roof of a Williamsburg hotel. (Time Out)

Ever wonder how the city’s greenmarkets continue to have fresh produce in the winter? Here’s your answer. (amNY)

Is anyone surprised that the state’s police unions oppose legalizing marijuana? (NY Post)

The Astoria Boulevard N/W station will close for nine months starting in March as elevators are installed. (TimesLedger)

A look at The Pirates, an enclave of fans of of F.C. St. Pauli, a German anti-fascist soccer team. (NY Times)

8 highlights from the new Museum of the Dog. (Untapped Cities)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.