The Briefly for April 8, 2020 – The “Attention Art Thieves: Please Stay Home” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Speeding is up, the mystery of the Anti-COVID-19 Volunteer Drone Task Force, the era of polite social distancing is over, and more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 63˚ Rain in the morning.

We are past politely asking for social distancing. We are in the “get the f**k back” era of NYC during COVID-19. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city is cutting this year’s summer youth jobs program, removing 75,000 minimum wage jobs from the city’s job pool. (Reema Amin and Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

A look at the building, and rebuilding, and rebuilding, of the Gowanus Canal bridges. (Joe Enright for Red Hook Star-Revue)

It’s been two months since Mayor de Blasio nominated Victor Calise and Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez to the MTA’s board, but Governor Cuomo hasn’t submitted them to the state senate, which is now in an indefinite recess. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

At least 1,167 MTA workers have tested positive for the coronavirus, 33 have died, and 5,604 others have self-quarantined because they are showing symptoms., essentially crippling the MTA’s ability to operate. (Christina Gildbaum for NY Times)

Attention art thieves: please stay home. (Colin Moynihan for NY Times)

One of the USNS Comfort’s crew members tested positive for COVID-19. That didn’t take long. (Lara Seligman for Politico)

Cathedral of St. John the Divine is the largest cathedral in the world, and fo Easter this year it will become an emergency hospital for up to 200 in partnership with Mount Sinai Morningside Hospital. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A guide to restaurants selling their wine cellars. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

This year’s Obie awards, which celebrates Off Broadway and Off Off Broadway theater, will be broadcast online this year, and the money intended for the production will be given to the artists whose plays couldn’t be staged. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

From a warehouse to your door, portraits of the people keeping restaurants coming. (Gary He for Eater)

Automobile traffic is down 30-35%, but speeding is up 12%. Who are these assholes? (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

The city will be releasing data on the racial breakdown of coronavirus cases that will show racial disparities among those who are affected by the pandemic. (Elisha Fieldstadt for NBC News)

The “Tenant Safe Harbor Act” is an effort from the state to prevent a tidal wave of evictions once the eviction moratorium is lifted. The bill would give tenants six months after the moratorium to catch up on their rent. It’s not perfect, but it’s a step in the right direction. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The official Met gala is postponed forever, so maybe an online-only gala from an unaffiliated Twitter account is a good idea? They’ll be using this year’s theme, “About Time: Fashion and Duration.” Can’t wait to see all those outfits inside a bedroom that’s been very lived in for two months. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Brooklyn’s got a new cookie delivery service. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

“In short, the mayor had no interest in doing anything real, and he created something destined to fail.” A look at Mayor de Blasio’s doomed open streets program. (Gersh Kuntsman for Streetsblog)

The FAA is looking into whoever was behind the “Anti-COVID-19 Volunteer Drone Task Force” that was out yelling at people with a drone over the weekend at East River Park. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The city will start to report suspected COVID-19 deaths alongside the confirmed cases This would include New Yorkers that die at home without a positive test. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

40 restaurants that are giving back. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thin sliced large-bore salami, Portuguese rolls, chourico, hot roast beef, and more. In praise of the “Meat Sandwiches” at M&O Market in the Village. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 20, 2019 – The “Do You Know About the Secret Pet Tree?” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Inwood rezoning is killed in court, New York state’s $6 billion deficit, the city moves to kill its relationship with the Trump Organization, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 33˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 27˚ High: 42˚

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit the 1, 3, 6, A, E, F, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The story of the two menorahs claiming to be the world’s largest and why there can’t ever be a bigger menorah. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

13 places to find festive holiday decorations in the city. Do you know where to find the secret pet tree in Central Park? (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Landlords are blaming the new rent laws on why they’re cutting back on apartment renovations. Or maybe it’s because landlords are always cutting back on apartment renovations? (The Real Deal)

The fourth annual Kwanzaa crawl is happening on the 26th with stops in Harlem and Brooklyn to celebrate the city’s black-owned restaurants and bars. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Will less garbage cans in Prospect Park lead to people carrying their garbage out of the park? The Prospect Park Alliance will be trying a “carry-in, carry-out” policy modeled after the National Parks Service policy. (Colin Mixson for Brooklyn Paper)

The MTA tried a similar program for five years where garbage cans were removed form stations and riders were encouraged to carry their garbage out with them. It ended because the amount of track fires caused by trash doubled after the program was implemented. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

The MTA unveiled 68 subway stations that will be getting elevator upgrades as part of their 2020-2024 capital plan. Among the 68 are Broadway Junction, Woodhaven Boulevard, and Van Cortlandt Park-242 St. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

There are over 100 subway stations across the city where one or more entrance is “temporarily” closed, some since the 70s or 80s. Maybe it’s time to reopen some of these entrances? (Canaan Geberer for Brooklyn Eagle)

After a nine month renovation, the Astoria Boulevard stop on the N/W line reopened on Wednesday, but construction will continue as workers instal elevators, staircases, walkways, and more. (NY1)

Turns out Christmas is predicted to be warmer than average this year and more importantly, no snow. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

We will all wake up on January 1, 2020 sharing the state’s fresh $6 billion deficit. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

14 historic sites of the abolitionist movement in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Video: Meet Hannah Gavios, who completed the 2019 New York City Marathon on a pair of crutches. (Great Big Story)

Governors Ball wants to move to Van Cortlandt Park the Bronx. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Where to eat with a really big group. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Queens man impeached. (Victoria Merlino for Queens Eagle)

RIP Felix Rohatyn, “Felix the Fixer,” the man who saved NYC from financial collapse in 1975. (Bruce Nelan for Washington Post)

For a brief period of time on Thursday you could come across impeachment-themed postcards in the Trump Tower gift shop thanks to comedians Davram Steifler and Jason Selvig. They’ve done it in the past too, with Russian flags, Putin postcards, and KKK hoods. (Lee Moran for HuffPost)

For the second year in a row we are ending the year with less chain stores in the city than we started. The city overall is down 304 chains. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Terra cotta building facades have a history of disrepair and danger, from the death of Grace Gold in 1979 to this week’s death of Erica Tishman. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo’s Mother Cabrini statue has found a home in Battery Park City’s South Cove. The patron saint of immigrants will be across the harbor from the Statue of Liberty. (John Alexander for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Meet Athena Soules: The artist and co-founder of NYC Light Brigade, whose signs are shaping the image of New York’s resistance movement. (Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Eagle)

The City Council appears to be ready to flush the Trump Organization, targeting city contracts with the Trump Organization at the skating rinks in Central Park and the Trump Golf Links in the Bronx. Both locations are underperforming and losing funds for city parks. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The Heartland Brewery is on its last legs. Down to three locations, one in the Empire State Building and two in Times Square, the Empire State Building location is set to close next month with rumors of the last two locations closing following suit in 2020. (Erika Adams for Grub Street)

We better start getting used to seeing humpback whales in city waters, because they’re hanging out even in winter. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

One day people will look back at the 2019 trend of erecting plastic “igloos” outside in winter and laugh. We’re not there yet. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

It’s in violation of the city’s paid sick law to require employees to find replacements when calling out sick, but that didn’t stop Starbucks from doing that for years. A settlement with the city is forcing Starbucks to pay $150,000 in restitution. (Kate Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How Jona Rechnitz, “a liar and a felon,” became a star witness after being arrested on corruption charges. (Jan Ramson for NY Times)

The Department of Transportation is hiring seven “apprentice highway and sewer inspectors” to inspect bike lanes and review road work done by contractors. Bike team, assemble! (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

A look back at Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019, a year spent trying to convince everyone they were wrong when they said no one wanted him to run for president and eventually he learned the truth and kept pushing until he had no money left and came home. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The City Council and the mayor blew their own self-imposed deadline of the end of the year to reform the city’s property tax system. That’s politician-speak for “broken promise.” (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Speaking of blown self-imposed deadlines, it looks like the NYPD won’t actually be encrypting their radios in 2020. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

A judge nullified Inwoods rezoning, finding that the de Blasio administration “failed to take a hard look” at how the land use changes will impact the neighborhood. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Only two out of 28 yeshivas investigated by the city’s Department of Education were deemed to be providing an education “substantially equivalent“ to that given at secular public schools, according to the city’s report on the long-delayed investigation into failing yeshivas. (Madina Touré for Politico)

A straightforward guide to holiday tipping. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 9, 2019 – The “Amazon Comes Crawling Back” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Rezoning leads to gentrification, the NYPD is being sued for racist policies, the worst meals of 2019, SantaCon on a boat, and more

The only late-night disruptions on the subways this week are on the 4, 6, D, E, J, and Q trains. Read up before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

Does rezoning lead to gentrification? A study looking at two rezonings during the Bloomberg administration in Park Slope and the Greenpoint-Williamsburg waterfront shows the populations of black and Latino residents dropped by the thousands while the overall population of the neighborhoods grew. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

With the results of that study, there is pressure on the City Council to pass legislation that would require the city to predict demographical changes before a neighborhood is rezoned. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Hello Amazon, look who came crawling back and is opening a new office in Hudson Yards without any taxpayer subsidies. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

>Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is for her stance on HQ2 in Long Island City. (@AOC)

The governor and mayor, whose administrations are responsible for the failed HQ2, are still pointing fingers. Cuomo is pointing fingers at the politicians who stepped up in opposition to the deal and de Blasio is blaming Amazon for walking away. (Amy Russo for HuffPost)

The NYPD were targeting black and hispanic people for minor offenses in the subways from 2011 to 2015. That’s not only according to a lawsuit, but also multiple sworn statements from NYPD officers. (Joseph Goldstein and Ashley Southall for NY Times)

The NYCHA has issued a “heat action plan,” which establishes a protocol to fix and prevent heat outages. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

What did your street look like in the 1800s? Check it out with OldNYC’s StreetView-like viewer. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The top 10 secrets of Chumley’s, the Greenwich Village speakeasy from 1922. (Claire Leaden for Untapped New York)

Six Astoria restaurants with outdoor dining all year long. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

A Park Slope substitute teacher is in trouble after telling his class of 1st graders that Santa isn’t real during a class about convincing. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s been three years since the last gun buyback program in the city. What’s the history of buyback programs and why has it been so long since the last one? (Noah Goldberg for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A look at the history of the Queensboro Bridge. (Lannyl Stephens for GVSHP)

Are the governor and mayor’s strategies to help the city’s homeless working? The answer is somewhere between the data collected is “vague” and completely inconclusive. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

Congressperson Max Rose is trying to save the Staten Island Yankees from obvilion. Part of MLB’s reasoning for announcing the elimination of the team is unacceptable time travel for teams and players not receiving a fare wage for their services. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The list of restaurants ordered closed is back this week with a new entry into the 100+ point violation club. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Why is Mike Bloomberg lying that no one asked him about stop-and-frisk until now? (Amy Russo for HuffPost)

The best holiday markets in NYC. (Ameena Walker for Curbed)

31 literary icons of Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

If you don’t like the idea of SantaCon you’re really not gonna like the idea of Fireball whiskey sponsored SantaCon party yachts. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Are you a bus? (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Congrats Tribeca, you beat 90210 as the nation’s most expensive zip code. (Kathleen Culliton for amNewYork)

Lucky Lee’s, which claimed to have “clean” Chinese food, is closed a year after it opened. (Serena Dai)

Forget the best. Here are the worst dishes of 2019. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)