The Briefly for March 8, 2019 – The “Does NYC’s Best Breakfast Cost Less Than a Subway Ride?” Edition

The Amazon Killer has a new challenger, the latest proposed tax to find the MTA, transformative women of the Village, and more.

Are you ready for the weekend? Are you ready for the weekend’s subway changes and disruptions? (6sqft)

Mark Manders’ “Tilted Head” installation is now viewable at the entrance to Central Park at 60th St and Fifth Ave. It is a giant, crumbling, tilted head, not just a clever nickname. (Untapped Cities)

Food 52 declared the best breakfast in New York City and it’s only $1.75. (Food 52)

Yellow cab drivers are protesting $2.50 surcharge they are charged for any rides south of 96th St, saying the tax unfairly burdens them compared to other for-hire cars. (Gothamist)

Every new proposed tax could help fund the MTA, the latest being a pied-à-terre tax. Now all the state has to do is actually pull the trigger. (6sqft)

State Senator Michael Gianaris, Amazon killer, has some words for David Lichtenstein, the man who said the day Amazon decided to back out of their plan was the “worst day for NYC once 9/11.” (The Real Deal)

Gianaris has competition from within the Democratic party in the form of a 39-year old Justin Potter, owner of DefeatGianaris.com. (LICTalk)1

A bill being considered in Albany would add six holidays to the school year. (CBS New York)

Queens District Attorney Richard Brown announced he’s resigning from the office he has held for the last 27 years due to complications from Parkinson’s Disease. His Chief Assistant John Ryan will take over effective immediately. (QNS)

14 chefs pick the city’s most underrated restaurants. (Grubstreet)

An 11-year-old was taken into custody after making a shooting threat at Bay Academy Junior High School. (Bklyner)

The orthopedic surgeon who bakes pizza. The biomedical engineer Ph.D. who drives an Uber. Brain waste is growing among the city’s immigrant communities. (City Limits)

20 transformative women of Greenwich Village. (6sqft)

5 apps every NYC foodie should download. Don’t worry, none of them are Yelp, Foursquare, Seamless, GrubHub, Meal Pal, or Ritual. (amNY)

Inside Lucali, who Food Insider calls “the most legendary pizza restaurant in Brooklyn.” (Food Insider)

What you need to know about Manhattan’s St. Patrick’s Day parade in Midtown. (Curbed)

The MTA and DOT may bail on the 14th Street busway during the L train rehab. (Streetsblog)

The Weeksville History Center in Crown Heights is holding a Wikipedia-Thon this Saturday to celebrate the importance of the contributions women have made. (Brownstoner)

The long list of restaurants who closed this week, including the 30-plus-year-old Trattoria Spaghetto in the West Village. (Eater)

Would you get a haircut at one of Yelp’s worst-rated barber shops? (Viewing NYC)

Why hasn’t one of the 21 congressional delegates from New York endorsed Senator Kirsten Gillibrand for president? (NY Times)

The story of how an Upper East Side man’s overdose triggered a waterfall of arrests, including an NYPD cop and more than a dozen drug dealers. (NY Post)

The hottest Manhattan restaurants this month. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for February 12, 2019 – The “Sometimes You Need To Look at Photos of Dogs” Edition

Congestion pricing and legal recreational marijuana get real, the mayor won’t act on parking placard abuse, but the City Council will, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you haven’t gone outside yet, today’s weather is going to be miserable. (Patch)

Take a look inside Seth Meyers’ apartment. (Curbed)

The story behind the Harriet Tubman Memorial “Swing Low” on 122nd Street. (6sqft)

Photos from The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. You know you can’t resist. (Gothamist)

It’s 0.0000797113 of an acre on the corner of Seventh Ave and Christopher Street and if you don’t look down at the right moment you’ll miss a significant piece of defiant private property that defines the spirit of the Village. (NY Times)

There is a 2017 city law that dictates that all entrances used by pedestrians must have visible numbers. Over 53% of buildings on 42nd Street are missing numbers. City Councilmember Jumaane Williams introduced the law and is tired of selective enforcement. (amNY)

The five oldest buildings in Manhattan. (Untapped Cities)

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s public school report that addresses segregation in education is released. Now that his crutch of talking about how the report is coming has been removed, the mayor has to actually do something, which is not his strong suit. (NY Times)

New York will likely lose a seat in the House of Representatives in 2020, and New York Democrats could redraw Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ district to remove her from Congress. If AOC is asked to leave with such a large national profile, she could target Chuck Schumer’s senate seat in 2022. (The Intercept)

Getting a tattoo in a subway car? Unless you love staph infections, it’s not a great idea. Maybe that’s why TuffCity Tattoo created a replica car. (Untapped Cities)

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the New York Public Library has released an interactive map of fictional love in the city. (6sqft)

CatVideoFest is shockingly not happening in Williamsburg or Bushwick. (Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo’s transportation deputy unveiled their latest proposal for congestion pricing. Implementation would go into effect in 2021 and any vehicle going into the “central business district” in Manhattan would be charged roughly $11.52, no matter where you enter. There will be no business exemption and the funds will be put into a “lockbox” for the MTA. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

McNally Jackson is staying in SoHo. They’re not moving, but they’re opening two new stores in City Point in Brooklyn and the South Street Seaport. (The Real Deal)

Upstate says they’ll take Amazon HQ2 if we don’t want it. Maybe the Syracuse-Rochester corridor forgets that Amazon has to want to be there. (NY Post)

“We have reminded the folks there that we are still here” New Jersey also would take HQ2, but Governor Phil Murphy said it in the saddest way possible. (NY Post)

Ruben Diaz Sr, noted homophobe and city council member, says that he is the victim in this story. (Patch)

Curbed is hiring a full-time, junior-level reporter. (Curbed)

Kings Plaza Shopping Center, the site of the large fire that injured over 20 people in September of last year, continues to receive fines for illegally storing cars. Their latest fine could be $25,000, their second in the last six months. (Brooklyn Paper)

You haven’t missed the news. The jury in the El Chapo trial are still deliberating. (NY Post)

Here are the city’s 20 most dangerous one-lane intersections for pedestrians and cyclists. (Localize.city)

The L train mystery odor is one week old and it has two new siblings. Joining the party is a thick fog and the smell of rubbing alcohol. The smell appears to be permeating the subways into nearby apartments. (Gothamist)

The City Council unveiled multiple bills that would mandate proactive enforcement and increase oversight of parking placard abuse. One bill would ban city vehicles from blocking crosswalks, fire hydrants, sidewalks, bike lanes and bus lanes unless there is an emergency. It’s maddening that this is currently legal. (Patch)

According to the state budget: Recreational marijuana will come with three taxes. $1 per dry weight gram of flower and $0.25 per gram of trim, 20% sales tax and a 2% local sales tax. You would be able to grow and process up to six plants on private property, using it would be illegal except for private property and can’t take it across state lines. (amNY)

A gym teacher in Brooklyn was fired for playing Fortnite with his students. (NY Post)

HUD administrator Lynne Patton’s stunt of living in different NYCHA buildings for the next four weeks has already been proven to be a farce. (NY Post)

The mayor is so sure that he’s such done a great job that he’s headed to New Hampshire to continue flirting with running for president. (NY Post)

Where to eat near Grand Central.

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for February 8, 2019 – The “MTA Is A Disgrace For This State, We All Know It” Edition

The weekend’s subway closures, the Grand Hyatt on 42nd will be torn down, an NYPD captain attacked a cyclist, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you normally ride the 4, 5, D, N, and Q trains, get ready for a rough weekend. If you’re along the L, you already know what to expect. The weekend is only a few hours away, make sure to check the trains for closures and diversions before you head out. (6sqft)

The city will have to cut $750 million from its 2020 fiscal budget to make up for a near billion dollar shortfall of tax revenues. (amNY)

Andres Lopez Elorez was sentenced to six years in prison for his role in smuggling liquid heroin stuffed inside puppies. (NY Times)

“The MTA is a disgrace for this state, we all know it,” said the man who has so much control over the MTA that he was able to cancel the entire L train shutdown. (Curbed)

Why did an NYPD captain apparently tackle a man riding a bike in Midtown? (Streetsblog)

This is pretty cool. The city’s budget includes money to install technology at 300 intersections that will hold green lights and shorten red lights for keep city buses moving faster. (Streetsblog)

How’s the rezoning going in Gowanus? The community’s not thrilled. (Bklyner)

Did MTV cancel “Made in Staten Island?” Maybe those 9,300 signatures on change.org made a difference. (amNY)

If you don’t love the Mandarin Duck while he molts, you don’t deserve him at his best. (Gothamist)

Happy national pizza day on Saturday. Never forget John Stewart’s epic anti-Chicago deep-dish “pizza” rant.

Margaret Cho, Jon Glaser, Dave Hill, and more join Red Room Orchestra for two back-to-back evenings of live music from Twin Peaks and the films of Wes Anderson at Symphony Space on February 15 & 16. (Sponsored by Symphony Space)

Metropolitan Republican Club, the epicenter of the Proud Boys fights last year, has a new president. Ian Reilly formerly advised a group that endorsed shooting migrants, forgetting the Holocaust, and marched with neo-Nazis. (Gothamist)

The oil smell in the L train tunnels has lingered all week. The smells have made at least three MTA workers sick and caused the train to stop service for a period of time on Wednesday. (Brokelyn)

The 10 most charming spots in the Greenwich Village Historic District. (6sqft)

“Statues for Equality” will bring 10 bronze sculptures of women to the city. The 10 will raise the number of statues of women in the city by 200%. (6sqft)

The 25 most expensive homes for sale, if you’re looking to do a bit of shopping. (Curbed)

Whoops! Public Advocate candidate Ron Kim forgot to mention his ownership of multiple luxury properties to a state ethics agency. (The Real Deal)

The 10 highest grossing Broadway shows of all time. (Viewing NYC)

Say farewell to the Grand Hyatt on 42nd. Donald Trump’s first major Manhattan project is being torn down and replaced. (NY Post)

Etna Tool & Die was a staple of Bond Street for a century in a neighborhood with apartments selling for over ten million dollars. The building’s new owner has no intentions of giving in to the neighborhood’s pressures. (NY Times)

The most romantic restaurants in the city. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.