The Briefly for July 25, 2019 – The “In-N-Out Mystery Has Been Solved” Edition

The MTA will reorganize, Amazon eyes a move in Sunset Park, the mayor will unveil a new bike safety plan, Occupy NYCHA, dog jails return, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

After 17 bicyclists have died on city streets at the hands of drivers, the mayor has decided that his Vision Zero program isn’t enough, and will be unveiling a $58.4 million bike safety plan. (NY Times)

Step inside America’s first theatrical club, The Lambs, with a photo gallery. (Untapped Cities)

Summer Streets makes its return to… the summer’s streets on Saturdays in August on Park Avenue from East 51st St to Foley Square. (Gothamist)

The In-N-Out mystery has been solved. A teenager brought four burgers back from CA and accidentally dropped one in the street. What’s the next city mystery that needs solving? (Eater)

The best cold noodles in NYC. (Grub Street)

Making weekend plans? Here are NYC’s seaside neighborhoods that are calling your name this summer. (amNY)

Eater asks: Is Per Se good again? The answer? “Sort of.” (Eater)

Gothamist is hiring a fulltime digital reporter/producer. (Gothamist)

Firstess Earth Crosby died this week after the injuries she sustained at the end of February from being run over with a truck. The driver was not issued a summons and has not been charged. She was the 59th pedestrian to die in 2019 as a result of the actions of a driver. (Streetsblog)

“Daniel Pantaleo and the other officers involved in Eric Garner’s horrific death should be fired.” Corey Johnson was able to say what our mayor was not. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The slowest Bronx bus is the Bx19 with a speedy 4.8 mph average, the most unreliable is the Bx3, which arrived bunched with other Bx3 buses 19,2% of the time. (Welcome2TheBronx)

“Why put up tin cans?” Sometimes art is too abstract for its own good. There is a backlash against a public art installation in Chinatown by residents because the abstract piece has seemingly no connection to Chinese culture. (Gothamist)

The MTA, after a 1-2 punch of being told by the governor to address the growing homeless population on the subways and learning the contractor they hired to handle homeless outreach was doing anything but, announced a href=”https://www.6sqft.com/mta-moves-to-create-homelessness-task-force-as-outreach-efforts-come-under-scrutiny/”>they will create a homeless task force that will have 30 days to create a plan. (6sqft)

The City Council passed the “Storefront Tracker” bill that requires landlords to report on the storefronts they own and rent out to better help the city understand commercial rents and how many storefronts are vacant across the city. Landlords who don’t comply within 120 days will start to be hit with fines. (Curbed)

Stan Lee Way will be coming to University Ave between Brandt Pl and @ 176 in University Heights, near his childhood home. (Bronx Times)

Remember those little air-conditioned dog jails that popped up outside grocery stores a few years ago? They’re coming back with a “pet harbor” pilot program that will allow you to put your pooch into one of these dog jails for up to an hour. (6sqft)

The state legislature failed to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in 2019. Can they get the job done in 2020? (amNY)

ConEd is only five years late on delivering a plan to help prevent power outages caused by heatwaves. (Gothamist)

Three days after ConEd intentionally cut the power to Brooklyn neighborhoods, there are still people without power. (Brooklyn Paper)

You can get a rare look inside the Little Red Lighthouse in Washington Heights this weekend. (6qft)

11 days after being shut down by the Department of Health, the Time Out Market in DUMBO has reopened. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Nothing will stop the mayor from working out in the Park Slope YMCA, not the one hour drive between Gracie Mansion and Park Slope, and not a bomb threat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

You’re trapped inside a stalled subway train. What do you do? Here’s a guide. (Gothamist)

Don’t let stories about Amazon looking to lease one million square feet in Industry City confuse you, Amazon already leases one million square feet nearby and their contract is ending and they’re reportedly seeing what their options are. (Brownstoner)

Amelia Earhart, Greenwich Villager. (GVSHP)

Three men involved in throwing some water on NYPD officers have been arrested and charged with criminal mischief. Don’t worry, the conversation around this incident has already been blown completely out of proportion by multiple people. (NY Times)

Video: What you need to know about the 1/2/3 train switch replacement at 96th St and how it will ruin your commute. (Viewing NYC)

There will be an Occupy NYCHA rally at City Hall on Friday. Meet the women behind it. (Gothamist)

The MTA approved a reorganization that could cut 2,700 jobs from the agency, save $530 million annually, and will not help your commute. (amNY)

A look at North Crown Heights, where Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and the neighborhood supports an upzoning proposal to create new business opportunities. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

16 bubble tea shops to try in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 29, 2019 – The “Amazon Comes Crawling Back” Edition

20,000 bees on a street corner, legal weed gains steam (again), 10 hidden bars and restaurants, Manhattanhenge, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is releasing the results of its study of water fountain parks and the results will inspire you to carry a water bottle with you at all times. (QNS)

Tonight kicks off one of four nights of the year to see Manhattanhenge. (Viewing NYC)

They always come crawling back. Amazon is looking for office space in Midtown West. This won’t likely be 25,000 new jobs, but it seems they can’t stay away. (Curbed)

The top 10 secrets of Citi Field. Some people say if you listen hard enough, you can hear a baseball team playing. (Untapped Cities)

Photos from inside the new Essex Market. (Gothamist)

Nothing to see here, just 20,000 bees hanging out on a street corner in Sunnyside. (Sunnyside Post)

If you’re a superfan of the MTV’s first season of The Real World: New York and have about $8 million sitting around, you’re in luck. The loft is for sale. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel’s food hall reopened after a failed health inspection last week. (Eater)

Luna Park housing in Coney Island is losing $500,000 after one of the people in charge was arrested for accepting bribes to help unqualified applicants get apartments. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Kudos to Grub Street for leaving out the most obvious possible entries to their list of 10 hidden restaurants and bars. (Grub Street)

The woman who was hit by a falling branch in Washington Square Park last week is doing better and her doctors are optimistic. Her injuries from the falling branch included skull and spine fractures. (Downtown Express)

Measles cases in Brooklyn have spread beyond the Orthodox Jewish communities in Brooklyn and the numbers have hit the double digits. Sunset Park has a high vaccination rate and the outbreak should be contained. The city’s total number is up to 535. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The calls for an end to the religious exemption for vaccines are growing. (Patch)

Community Board 6 attempted to save Red Hook’s Lidgerwood Building which dates back to 1882 with a plea to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but it was demolished last weekend to make way for a UPS facility. (Bklyner)

Video: The next best thing to riding the Wonder Wheel is experiencing it in 4k and 60 frames per second. (ActionKid)

A look at the life of the Lincoln Memorial’s sculptor Daniel Chester French, a resident of Greenwich Village. (GVSHP)

RIP the second incarnation of Hank’s Saloon. The owners of Hill Country Barbeque Market are shutting down their food hall and evicting Hank’s in the process. (Gothamist)

Sports betting in New York? The governor says it’s possible. (Politico)

17 waterfront restaurants to enjoy when we’re not being threatened with tornado warnings. (Eater)

Mina Malik joined fellow candidate Tiffany Cabán in announcing that as the Queens District Attorney, she will not prosecute sex workers. (QNS)

Momentum is growing (again) for marijuana legalization, but we’ve heard this song twice this year without results. The bill doesn’t have the governor’s full support. The governor cites a lack of support from the legislature and the legislature cites a lack of support from the governor. (Gothamist)

Following the moves of the workers of the Tenement Museum, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, and the New Museum, BAM workers are seeking to unionize. (Bedford + Bowery)

The personal hip-hop collection of Fab 5 Freddy was purchased by the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, which will ensure that the earliest days of hip-hop have a permanent home as a piece of history. (Atlas Obscura)

Turns out allowing cyclists to follow pedestrian signals and not traffic lights would make the streets safer, according to a new study from the city. (amNY)

Where to drink right now. The Infatuation’s regularly updated list has been, as you might have guessed, updated with Coast and Valley and Jungle Bird. (The Infatuation)

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