The Briefly for July 31, 2020 – The “NYC Loves Until It Destroys” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: School outbreak plans, restaurant openings and closings, looking at a billionaire’s tax, where to eat outdoor brunch, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 78˚
Rain in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 75˚ High: 85˚

Is it legal to sublet your apartment? Yes, but it’s complicated. (Localize.City)

Photos: If you’re looking for a unique experience when it comes to outdoor dining, check out the USS Baylander at the West Harlem Piers near 125th St, which has a dockside bar and restaurant. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Real Estate Porn: A $3.4 million Clinton Hill house with a haunted past. (Dana Shulz for 6sqft)

Just in time for school conversations to spin up again, here’s this headline from the Times: Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

Every student in the city is going to be issued a $420 food stamp card, regardless of their income. This creates a weird dilemma for high-income families. The money on the cards is real and if it isn’t used it’s wasted, and giving the card to someone else to use is fraud. Fortunately, there is a solution. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

The city released plans for handling Covid-19 outbreaks in schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Is it possible for New Yorkers to “discover” a secluded and wonderful spot without destroying it? That’s the question across the entire city. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Without a federal stimulus, do NYC schools have enough money to open safely? (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Suraj Patel isn’t ready to concede the 12th Congressional district primary to incumbent Carolyn Mahoney, despite Mahony’s 3,700 vote lead, citing 12,000 ballots invalidated by the Board of Elections. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

He survived physical abuse, homelessness, and gang violence before coming to America as a refugee, where a homeless shelter trashed his wheelchairs while Saheed Adebayo Aare was put in a Manhattan isolation hotel. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Looking for somewhere new and weird to explore? Check out Dead Horse Inlet and Dead Horse Bay. (Kevin Wash for Forgotten New York)

The New York Liberty has a new CEO, just like the Brooklyn Nets do. Joe Tsai owns both teams and has been taking steps to put them both on equal footing with the installation of Keia Clark as CEO of the Liberty with the eventual goal of bringing the Liberty to the Barclays Center once possible. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Amanda Cohen, the chef and owner of Dirt Candy on if the no-tipping movement can survive the pandemic. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

The Department of Environmental Protection is looking to delay the Gowanus Canal cleanup from somewhere between 12 to 18 months due to declining revenues during the pandemic. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Remember when Governor Cuomo promised states that when New York was over the Covid-19 hump, he’d start sending help? Florida is the first recipient of his pledge, with the state sending gowns, gloves, masks, face shields, and hand santizer. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s legislature is introducing bills to try to prevent a doomsday scenario in the city where a rise in apartment vacancies could put an end to rent regulation. Under the current laws, when more than 5% of NYC apartments are vacant, rent regulation would come to an end. Building apartments and intentionally keeping them empty or working as hard as possible to evict tenants to drive up the vacancy rate sounds like a conspiracy but I’ll never put anything past landlords. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Governor Cuomo is against raising taxes on billionaires but seems to be totally cool with raising MTA fares and tolls on bridges, essentially taxing every non-billionaire instead. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The arguments for and against the constitutionality of a billionaires’ tax. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

June and July bring the summer’s heat, but it also brings nesting turtles onto the runways of JFK airport. Inside the annual struggle to protect the turtles in Jamaica Bay. (Lori Chung for NY1)

Even if Columbia University attempts to return to in-person classes in the call a strike by maintenance workers could halt their plans completely unless a new contract is agreed to by Friday night. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

With no help from the Yankees, the 161st St BID is trying to create a welcoming atmosphere around the stadium to help many of the area’s struggling businesses. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

McCarren Tennis Center’s weatherproof bubble over the public tennis courts will stay up all summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

Only around 14 percent of state prison inmates have been tested for Covid-19 since the crisis began. I’m no epidemiologist, but that seems like a low percentage. In comparison, there has been 2.596 million tests conducted in the city, which would cover about 30% of the population. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Tropical Storm Isaias may make landfall in NYC on Monday because things aren’t hard enough already. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What to expect at today’s “Take Your Knee Off Our Necks” in Midtown. (NY1)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is making the New York City court system into a scapegoat for the recent surge in gun violence according to Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks. (NY1)

Queens got a Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Family Court on Jamaica Avenue. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Get ready, because it’s ConEd blackout season. Southern Brooklyn was the first to be asked to turn down their electrical usage. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Where to get takeout in Greenwich Village and the West Village. Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The MTA is installing free mask dispensers inside city buses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Augustine in the Financial DIstrict. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Rosario’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

A list of the Williamsburg & Greenpoint places closed for good during COVID-19. (Bill Pearis for Greenpointers)

Farewell to Le Sia in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

Farewell to An Choi on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Union Pool’s patio and taco truck are back! (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Mott Street from Worth to Moscoe is closed off to cars and 10 restaurants all have outdoor dining with seating for over 100. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Where to eat outside on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The best outdoor brunch spots in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 6, 2020 – The “Another Sign of the Apocalypse” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase three starts today, where to eat hot dogs, Dekalb Market goes above ground, The NYPD’s SpotShotter is put to the test, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 88˚
Rain in the evening.

Today starts phase three of the city’s reopening. Here’s what you can and can’t do under phase three. First and foremost, don’t stop wearing your damn masks. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Everyone’s got a friend outside the city that’s been talking about moving here on and off. Here’s a link you can send them instead of answering every question they have. How to know if you’re ready fo move to NYC. (Localize.City)

You’d think business interruption insurance would cover a moment like the Covid-19 pandemic, where businesses were… interrupted. You’d be giving the insurance industry too much credit, because they’ve been rejecting claims because businesses haven’t paid for “pandemic insurance.” (Peter Senzamici for The City)

Sound familiar? That’s because insurers were turning down business interruption insurance claims by the thousands after Hurricane Sandy, blaming specific damage on a flood at a Con Ed substation on E. 14th St. (Reuven Blau for Daily News in 2013)

There’s something killing the fish in the Hudson River. While officials say it’s nothing to be alarmed about, it’s hard to not see this as another sign of the apocalypse. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Ailing parents, dying family members, and economic insecurity, and all while trying to graduate high school. (Rebecca Klein for HuffPost)

Video: A look at the history of the “Freedom” tunnel that runs under Riverside Park and how it became the canvas for Chris “Freedom” Pape’s art and a homeless community. (Vice)

In the last month, there have been 95 lawsuits against the Archdiocese of New York with dozens more on the way. When Covid-19 put a pause on all court cases except “essential matters,” it paused all the court cases against the church, prompting the state’s legislature to extend the window for filing cases from January 2021 until August. The governor hasn’t signed the legislation yet, prompting the sudden flood. (Virginia Breen for The City)

The price of renting a one-bedroom apartment in the city dropped 2% and two-bedroom dropped 0.3% in June and rents are 5% down from last year, according to a new report from Zumper. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

In 2018, the Gowanus Canal’s 4th St basin was supposedly cleaned of “Black Mayo,” aka coal tar, by the EPA as a pilot program for the entire waterway. Work on cleaning the entire canal was scheduled to start later this year, using the same techniques. This week, unfortunately, the black mayo returned. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Dog owners are turning to CBD dog treats amid the endless stream of fireworks leading up to July 4. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1, congrats on the new job Kathleen)

The pandemic has brought a classic NYC staple back: rooftop culture. (Monika Hankova for Untapped New York)

Dekalb Market, the underground food hall underneath City Point in Downtown Brooklyn is reopening, but not underground. It will be taking over a portion of Gold Street and Willoughby Square Park as a reimagined Dekalb “Open-Air” Market. (Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

Rafael Espinal couldn’t have picked a worse time to abandon his post as the City Councilmember for Brooklyn’s 37th District if he tried, essentially robbing his former constituents of their voice through the Covid-19 pandemic, protests, and city budget/defund the NYPD debates. A special election was canceled by Governor Cuomo and Bushwick, East New York, and Cypress Hills won’t have representation on the City Council until Janaury. (Nigel Roberts for The Brooklyn Reader)

Van Leeuwen Ice Cream is introducing their summer flavors this week. How does Caramelized Banana Praline sound? (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The union representing 30,000 faculty and staff at CUNY is suing, alleging CUNY violated the terms of its federal bailout by laying off hundreds of adjunct faculty members, and are demanding that they be rehired. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Tips from a hospital stint on protecting yourself from Covid-19. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

What’s the purpose of legal observers if the NYPD keep arresting them? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

It’s been half a year since the mayor boasted to the press about the NYPD and Department of Homeless Services’ command center. A look at the change coming now that the NYPD are being kicked out. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

A memorial was held for Pop Smoke on Friday night outside his parents’ house in Canarsie the night of his album “Shoot for the Stars, Aim for the Moon.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re headed to the city’s beaches, there’s nothing that says you can’t combine the city’s new hobby of birdwatching with your beach-going. It’s piping plover nesting season, so keep an eye out for the endangered (and super cute) bird! (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo instituted a mandatory 14-day quarantine if you’re traveling to New York from 16 different states. How is it being enforced? 🤷‍♂️ (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Highlights from NBC’s recap of a week of “surprise” fireworks displays from Macy’s, including an unexplained shot of a building in South Korea for some reason? (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

The rats have been quiet, but with restaurants opening, expect that to change. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

Visitors are now able to go to the September 11th Memorial for the first time since March. The museum is still closed. (NY1)

The Strand is opening its Upper West Side location this month on Columbus Ave between 81st and 82nd St, the former home of Book Culture. (Sara Lebwohl for I Love The Upper West Side)

A rundown of the fatal five shootings in the city Sunday. (Todd Maisel for amNewyork Metro)

SpotShotter, the system the NYPD uses to detect gunshots, is under a real test with all the fireworks around the city. The system is, pardon the pun, shoddy at best, and its implementation has resulted in the targeting of Black and brown communities. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

RIP Nick Cordero, Tony-nominated Broadway performer, who passed away due to Covid-19. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The de Blasio administration is giving up on the idea of reworking the Brooklyn Bridge promenade, leaving the pedestrian and cyclist nightmare for the city’s next mayor. Here are Scott Stringer, Corey Johnson, and Eric Adams’ takes on the future of the bridge. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More people are riding the MTA’s buses than subways for the first time since volume numbers have been kept. (Christina Goldblum and Winnie Hu for NY Times)

A look at the history of Firemen’s Garden on E 8th St, where the NYFD’s Martin Celic lost his life in 1977. (Ephemeral New York)

A guide to the real-life NYC locations from Hamilton. (Untapped New York)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut and Miki Sudo, this year’s hot dog eating champions who both set new records and are $10,000 richer for it. (ESPN)

Where to eat hot dogs this summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Thrillist)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 23, 2020 – The “Are These NYC’s Bad Old Days?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s primary day in NYC, a look at the rules of outdoor dining in phase two, surprising chickens in a drug bust, the NY Post’s “copaganda,” and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 82˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Here’s how to vote in today’s primary. (BKLYNER)

Today is the primary across the city, but don’t expect results so quickly this time around. Absentee ballots aren’t counted until eight days past the election. We could be waiting a while. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, let me introduce you to the stacked highways all across Manhattan idea from the 1930s. (Joshua Mu for Viewing NYC)

After a spike in gun violence over the weekend, the mayor said the city isn’t going back to the bad old days where there was “so much violence in this city,” but also “Nor are we going back to the bad old days where policing was done the wrong way.” According to that statement, we are currently living in “the bad old days.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

With phase two, the city’s playgrounds have reopened. They are literally no safer than they used to be, so don’t expect sanitization or regular cleanings. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

The city formally announced that phase two would start on Monday on Thursday, giving restaurants four days to prepare and comply with a new set of regulations for outdoor dining. (Gary He for Eater)

What to expect from phase two of NYC’s reopening. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Here are the guidelines for reopened restaurants as a part of phase two. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

More than 3,000 restaurants have signed up to set up outdoor dining as the city enters the second phase of its reopening. The restaurants approved will be allowed to set up tables and chairs in parking spaces and sidewalks. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state moratorium on evictions ended over the weekend. There are advocacy groups that are estimating 50,000 – 60,000 cases could be filed in the next few days. This is the first wave of expected cases, another protection for people who were directly affected by Covid-19 expires in August. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hundreds of people gathered in protest to demand the eviction ban continues until the state has recovered from the Covid-19 crisis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An investigation is ongoing after a man fell onto the tracks and was hit and killed by the 7 train on Sunday night. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

“Back in my day, if you wanted to go to a Target, you had to go to Brooklyn, the Bronx, or New Jersey” is what very lame grandparents will tell their grandkids. Target announced it is opening stores on the Upper East and West Sides. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Facebook is eyeing expanding its footprint in the Hudson Yards, taking over the space that will be left vacant by Neiman Marcus’s bankruptcy. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos and Video: 10,000+ riders took part in the Street Riders’ Black Lives Matter Ride through Manhattan. Fun fact, more people showed up for the ride than turned out for Trump’s Tulsa rally. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Toby Tenenbaum for BrooklynVegan)

Heads up: The produce at this week’s farmers markets should be fantastic. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to a loophole about how the NYPD’s cars are funded, the two lawyers that are accused of tossing Molotov cocktails into empty police cars may be facing life in prison. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A look at the NY Post’s recent history of running “copaganda” articles that share police narratives with anonymous sourcing, zero additional verification, and in contradiction of facts. (Kay Dervishi for City and State)

The NYPD are known liars. Despite their crying in public about being “poisoned” by Shake Shack employees, a thorough review shows that the officers involved never displayed any symptoms of illness and the Shake Shack employees couldn’t have known that the order was for NYPD officers because the order was placed online. Despite this, police unions sent out information that the officers had started throwing up and invented a narrative of Antifa employees inside Shake Shack. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea testified in defense of the police’s actions against protesters during the first week of June without providing details and dodging every possible question that involved specifics and dismissed a delivery person’s arrest as a “false report.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Look around the city and you’ll see iconic statues wearing face masks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is usually the best party in the city every year, the Mermaid Parade, is going to be virtual and take place on August 29. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

The Inwood rezoning lawsuit, which was ruled that the de Blasio administration failed to account for the potential change in the racial makeup of the neighborhood, could forever change how the city plans neighborhoods towards something more equitable. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Members of Sure We Can, the city’s only nonprofit redemption center, is requesting $2.3 million from the city’s budget, saying they will have to close their Bushwick location that it has occupied for ten years without it, where hundreds of canners gather each morning to sort and redeem their bottles and cans.  (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The surprising part of this drug bust was unrelated to the drugs, it was the chickens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man who tried to escape Rikers Island on Thursday made another attempt to escape on Sunday. According to inmates at Rikers, the measures taken to combat Covid-19 have made Rikers intolerable. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Okay, phase two is in effect, but let’s look at what phase three could mean for the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

28 restaurants open for outdoor dining this week. (Eater)