The Briefly for October 18, 2019 – The “What Makes A Beehive A Hipster Beehive?” Weekend Edition

The Rikers replacement plan gets a City Council vote, the weekend’s subway disruptions, ridership on the M14 is up, thrilling breakfast sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Looking to go anywhere on the trains this weekend? Better check the planned subway disruptions before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

The City Council voted to close Rikers Island and the plan to replace it with neighborhood jails in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx is moving forward. (NY Times)

A look back at the Hall of Gems heist at the Museum of Natural History in 1964. (NY Times)

Deep inside the Woolworth Building is a swimming pool that was recently restored in all its stunning glory. (Untapped Cities)

Everyone in the city has enough to worry about before we start with “hipster” beehives. (Gothamist)

The MTA has turned Jay Street-MetroTech into an accessibility “laboratory” with a mix of infrastructure and apps in an attempt to make the station accessible to riders of all abilities. (Curbed)

The Department of Buildings released a new interactive map that tracks after-hours construction permits throughout the city. While it won’t stop the incessant noise, it will help to identify where it’s coming from. (6sqft)

Time Out’s list of the 100 best restaurants in the city has been updated. (Time Out)

The newly-expanded Museum of Modern Art is open, here’s what you need to know. (NY Times)

Brownsville resident Kyle Williams was arrested and charged with murder for the Old Timers Day Festival shooting at the end of July. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you absolutely must dance like an incel on the steps seen in the Joker movie, they’re on W 167th St between Shakespeare and Anderson Aves. (Time Out)

The governors of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania are working together to create standards for vaping safety regulations. (Politico)

The WNBA’s New York York Liberty will return to the city to play games at the Barclays Center after being outcast to Westchester in 2018. If only the Dolan family would sell the Knicks next. (Gothamist)

WNYC is going to end the show New Sounds, hosted by John Schaefer since its debut in 1982 as part of its shift away from music programming. (Gothamist)

A Mrs. Doubtfire musical is coming to Broadway. (Time Out)

The Brooklyn Marathon is Saturday, so get ready for street closures. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Turns out if you make the buses reliable, people want to ride them. Ridership along the M14 bus on 14th St is up since 14th St was cleared of cars. (The Villager)

An NYPD officer fatally shot a man during a traffic stop in the Bronx on Thursday, the second deadly shooting by the NYPD this week and the third time in three days that an officer fired at a suspect. (NY Times)

50-a is a controversial law that shields police personnel records from the public and the state is debating repealing the law. The Police Benevolent Association wants to look like it supports reform but is completely against the idea. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s 86th St has another name: the Pizza Trail. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s 12 most thrilling new breakfast sandwiches. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)

The Briefly for August 6, 2019 – The “Absolutely Unbelievable Story of A French Bulldog” Edition

The Union Square Tech Hub broke ground, the most rat-infested neighborhoods, a vigil turns into a mass shooting, a beaver in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Union Square Tech Hub, formerly the PC Richard & Son near Union Square, broke ground on Monday to cheers for new jobs and jeers that Union Square may soon resemble midtown. (amNY)

25,000 bees were removed from the Staten Island Ferry terminal in St. George. The NYPD’s beekeeping unit relocated the hive. If you come across thousands of bees, don’t spray them with anything and don’t call 311, call 911. (NY Times)

Meet Winston, a French bulldog who accidentally jumped off a six-story window, smashed through the sunroof of a car below and LIVED! Winston is staying at the vet for observation but has no broken bones. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio says Bernie Sanders would have won the 2016 election, does this embracing of Bernie mean the mayor is ready to stop spending his weekends in Iowa? (Politico)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard hit a milestone 10,000 jobs for the first time in half a century. While it may never see it’s World War II peak of 70,000 jobs, they are expecting to see 20,000 by 2021. (amNY)

Driverless cars have arrived in NYC, but they’re only inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard as shuttles, operating in a one-mile loop to and from the ferry terminal for free. (NY Times)

Which neighborhoods are the coolest in the city? Brooklyn Heights, Prospect Heights, and the Upper West Side. Strictly speaking, in those neighborhoods, tree cover provides the most shade and absorbs the most heat, making them the “coolest.” (Curbed)

The best Greek restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

De Blasio steps in it again. The city purchased a cluster of buildings in April for $173 million, which appraisals showed a value between $50 million and $143 million. De Blasio owns two houses in the city and the mortgages on those homes come from the brother of one of the people who sold the city the overpriced buildings. Par for the course for our failing presidential candidate of a mayor. (Curbed)

The Dogspot “pet harbors” aka “dog jails” pilot program in Brooklyn passed City Council. These are the little locking windowed air-conditioned jail cells for dogs to sit in while you go into a store. It’s a step up from leaving your dog tied up and unattended like your best furry friend is a bike. (Bushwick Daily)

Meeting, James Turrell’s skyspace installation at MoMA PS1 is open after having its unobstructed view of the sky marred by construction at the buildings where 5Pointz was in Long Island City. (Gothamist)

For those of the spooky persuasion, Halloween is less than 100 days away. For those inside the haunted house industry, it’s already time to get to work. Take a look inside the construction of the Bane Haunted House in Chelsea. (amNY)

Eight crypts and catacombs in the city, some spooky, some scary, some tourist attractions. (Untapped Cities)

What do Prospect Heights and Central Harlem South have in common? They’re the two neighborhoods with the most rats per square mile in the city. (Patch)

How cold do you want your ice cream? How about “liquid nitrogen cold?” Four Winters, a new ice cream shop in Queens, is using liquid nitrogen to create “instant ice cream.” (NY Times)

It’s a midtown sidewalk showdown between a business improvement district and food cart owners. Food cart owners are accusing midtown developers are accusing the BID of intentionally putting flower planters and bike racks where their carts usually stand in an attempt to get rid of them. (amNY)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite where over one million New Yorkers have been buried since the Civil War, operated by the Department of Corrections and inmates are paid $1 per hour to bury bodies, is finally getting a post-Hurricane Sandy restoration. Erosion has caused the shoreline to disappear and as a result, human remains were exposed. (Curbed)

Add this to your list of travel nightmare scenarios. A woman was locked underneath a Peter Pan coach bus with the luggage on a bus bound for Boston. The police arrested the Peter Pan employee that allegedly locked her in. (amNY)

Part of the deal that allowed the Atlantic Yards to be developed was that 2,250 affordable apartments would be built by 2025. At the current rate of construction, developer Greenland Forest City Partners looks like it’ll be missing that deadline. (The City)

A beaver was spotted in the Hudson River, hanging out and doing beaver things. It’s been a while since the city’s seen wild beavers, but the beaver is the official state animal and the city was pretty much founded on the fur trade, but this little guy is safe from that. (Gothamist)

The lawsuit preventing 14th St from becoming a busway has already cost commuters an additional year’s worth of delays. (amNY)

A vigil in Crown Heights became a public mass shooting when four of the people holding the vigil were shot early Monday morning. All the victims are in stable condition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Agrilus 9895 is a new species of beetle discovered in Green-Wood Cemetery and is a relative of a species of beetle in Europe but unique to Brooklyn. (Atlas Obscura)

Where do food industry pros go when their shifts are over? A list of late-night locations. (amNY)