The Briefly for January 28, 2020 – The “Is See Something, Say Something No Longer Adequate?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: City Council staff is a step closer to unionizing, Coronavirus, AOC quits the Sunnuyside Yards steering committee, the best fried rice dishes, and more

Today – Low: 31˚ High: 44˚
Clear throughout the day.

The Spotted Pig, as rumored over the weekend is closing. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here’s how to get a half-priced MetroCard from the city’s Fair Fares program, if you qualify. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It’s like a black and white cookie, but it’s a vegan milkshake with chocolate chips, black n’ white cake, whip cream and chocolate drizzle. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The MTA launched a new “Kindness. Respect. Solidarity.” campaign to encourage riders to report hate crimes, harassment or graffiti on the subways. This differs from the “See Something, Say Something” because for this campaign if you see something, you should… say something. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

More than 400 City Council staffers seeking to unionize to improve working conditions asked Council Speaker Corey Johnson to recognize them on Monday. If Recognized, this would be the first independent unionized legislative staff in the country. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

10 secrets of the United Palace, Manhattan’s fourth largest theater, celebrating its 90th year. (Untapped New York)

The best mac and cheese on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos: Inside the Central Park Club, an exclusive 100th floor private club looking over Central Park. (alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Video: New Yorkers rescued a woman trapped under an SUV on Sunday night by “collectively lifting” it off the ground. The woman trapped under the SUV was not hurt. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

There have been no confirmed cases have been reported in New York , but five people are waiting for Coronavirus test results. Across the country 110 people in 26 states are being tested and there have been five confirmed cases. If you are experiencing fever, cough, or difficulty breathing and have traveled to the central Chinese region, please contact a doctor immediately. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Senator Chuck Schumer is demanding the federal government declare a state of emergency as the fifth confirmed case of the deadly coronavirus was found in the U.S. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York is the 15th most polluted city in the country. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

10 spots in the city to bring you back to relive the Roaring 20s, but without all the Diphtheria. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

RIP Jason Polan, an artist whose goal was to draw every person in NYC. I’ve long been enamored by his art and his story is one of those that I’ve always believed as one that made New York special. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The story of how mead went from the Renaissance Fair to city bars. (James Reddicliffe for NY Times)

For the second time in a week, the MTA is dealing with bed bugs at the 71st Avenue stop in Forest Hills. An exterminator crew was seen at a control tower on Monday night. (NY1)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is stepped down from the Sunnyside Yards steering committee because the city’s Economic Development Corporation is not including feedback from any of the meetings the EDC has had with the public. (Christian Murray for Jackson Heights Post)

Bernie Sanders is stuck in Washington for President Trump’s impeachment, so AOC stepped in to wow the crowds in Iowa. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Recovery has begun of the Museum of Chinese in America’s archives. Museum staff hasn’t been allowed inside the building, which suffered structural damage from the fire on Friday, but city workers are able to remove boxes from the former home of the archives. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The daily lineups of Governors Ball are available. Stevie Nicks is on Friday night. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Queens State Senator Jessica Ramos joined advocates in Albany on Monday to urge passage of a bill that would restrict how schools uses suspensions as part of an effort to end the school-to-prison pipeline. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewyork Metro)

Where to eat the city’s best fried rice dishes.(Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The Briefly for January 28, 2019 – The “A Complete Lack of Ability to Enforce the Law” Edition

Big changes to the L train’s schedule, what the government shutdown’s shutdown means for NYC, a couch in a tree, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The 2, 3, 4, 7, A, D, E, and L trains are going through some major service disruptions late nights. (Subway Changes)

Starting today, there is no overnight L service between Broadway Junction to Manhattan for eight weeks. Starting February 1, the L will be shutdown for seven weekends straight. Yipes. (Brooklyn Paper)

The government shutdown is over, here’s what it means for New York City. (Metro)

The city has been proven to be mostly impotent when it comes to removing the billboard boats from city waters. (Gothamist)

The NYPD can’t enforce traffic violations in bike lanes AND bus lanes. That would be crazy! (NY Post)

It’s been 27 years, but the NYPD arrested Calvin Grant for the alleged murder of Stacey Lynette Joyner in Brownsville. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Now that his opinion means nothing to the situation, Mayor de Blasio has decided that he supports the governor’s L Train repair plan. (NY Post)

Kudos to the winning team from the 2019 Idiotarod. Take a look at this year’s idiots. (Brian Lin)

The subways, explained. (Curbed)

The Daily News’ editorial board is in favor of subway, bus, and bridge toll hikes. (Daily News)

The $298 million Powerball winner has come forward, and he’s happy to tell you he quit his job. (NY Post)

Pity the millionaires who have been moving out of the New York City area because of the financial markets and taxes. 5,700 people worth between $1 and $30 million people have moved. (The Real Deal)

Meet the 65 year-old professor with 600,000 Instagram followers. (New York Magazine)

No one tell the city’s real estate developers that artists are embracing the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (amNY)

Of the 472 sexual harassment complaints by city employees in 2018, only 37 of them were resulted in termination, demotion, retirement, transfer, or suspension. (NY Post)

Seriously, how did this couch end up in this tree? (West Side Rag)

15 things you probably didn’t know about the East Village. (6sqft)

There’s beef between Bareburger and one of the New York’s franchisors. (NY Post)

Max Rose hasn’t been in the House of Representatives for a month and Republican challengers have already started to emerge. (Bklyner)

17 bars to BYOF (bring your own food). (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for November 30, 2018 – The “Joyless, Arbitrary, Spiritually Empty” Edition

The weekend subway changes, rezoning North Brooklyn, Mrs. Maisel’s Greenwich Village, the snootiest area of the city, the subway station with the most crime, and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

The weekend’s subway nightmares, explained. (SubwayStats)

Take your pick: a dog film festival, a cat film festival, or a horse film festival. They’re all this weekend. (NY Times)

Amazon’s 4 Star store in SoHo: “among my most dismal shopping experiences in recent memory: joyless, arbitrary, spiritually empty.”

The Gowanus Canal is partially clean for the first time in 150 years. Can it ever be truly clean? (Curbed)

Citi Bike will triple the number of bikes in the next five years as a result of the city allowing its parent company, Motivate, to be bought by Lyft for $100 million. (amNY)

Take a tour of Anable Basin, the future home of Amazon’s HQ2. (Curbed)

If you’ve noticed businesses taking down awnings and replacing them with signs, you’re not alone. Is it a conspiracy? The Department of Buildings has started enforcing old laws that placed limits on letter size and awning size with fines that start at $4,000. City Council members have floated a theory that an awning company has called in complaints to drum up business. (Bklyner)

Mic, who occupied two stories of World Trade Center One, laid off most of its staff and is in talks to sell to Bustle. (Gothamist)

10 secrets of the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree. (Untapped Cities)

Four days of the new “modern” signals on the 7, four days of significant delays, and that was only a small part of what made Thursday’s commute awful. (Gothamist)

While likely not a surprise, Comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that argues the city doesn’t do enough for the city’s neediest families, despite Mayor de Blasio’s affordable housing agenda. (Curbed)

Atlantic Ave-Barclays Center has the distinction of having the most reported crimes of any subway stop in the city, with the Port Authority coming in second. Here are the 25 subway stations with the highest numbers of crime. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Hanukkah approaches, plan properly. (amNY)

A tour of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Greenwich Village. (GVSHP)

Life isn’t difficult enough for cyclists in the city before some nut job starts tossing thumbtacks into Sunnyside’s protected bike lanes. (Sunnyside Post)

What’s the snootiest area in the city? Before you click, try to guess. (StreetEasy)

A portion of LaGuardia’s new Terminal B opened on Thursday, including a fool hall, retail, and also some gates for airplanes to come and go from. Amazon Cuomo was there to cut the ribbon. (6sqft)

The NYPD is getting a new handbook on how to treat victims of crime. According to Commissioner James O’Neill, it’s about “simple human interaction.” (NY Post)

Irate Winterfest attendees are receiving refunds after attending the underwhelming first few days of the event in the Brooklyn Museum’s backyard. The Brooklyn Museum has been quick to point out that the event is being run by an outside company. (Bklyner)

Do opponents have any hope of stopping Amazon in Long Island City? (Gothamist)

A 125th St Whole Foods security guard choked a man unconscious. Turns out they take it seriously when you intentionally mislabel bulk goods. (NY Post)

RIP Bleecker Bob, owner of the appropriately titled Bleecker Bob’s. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

For 20 years, “Santa’s Corner” in Whitestone has been the epitome of “there’s no such thing as too many Christmas light on one house.” (TimesLedger)

The New York State Pavilion in Queens is receiving a $16 million federal grant from FEMA to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. (TimesLedger)

Can a rezoning of parts of Bushwick, Greenpoint, and Williamsburg save North Brooklyn from itself? (Brooklyn Paper)

Unsolicited dick pics being sent over AirDrop on iPhones is a problem and a new City Council bill could make it punishable by a $1,000 and a year in jail. (NY Times)

Kyle Borello, 31, was arrested for riot and attempted assault charges for last month’s Upper East Side fight involving The Proud Boys, a SPLC designated hate group and FBI classified extremist group with white nationalist ties. (NY Post)

13 of the hottest new cocktail bars. (Eater)

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