The Briefly for January 21, 2020 – The “Go Back to Iowa, Go Back to Ohio” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The pink gumball machine mystery has been solved, the secrets of the city’s oldest comedy barker, the true history of Central Park’s Great Lawn, and more

Today – Low: 21˚ High: 32˚
Clear throughout the day.

A longtime staffer to Assemblyperson Catherine Nolan and Long Island City resident, Edwin Cadiz, has been named the 2020 NAACP “Man of the Year.” (QNS)

The origin of the pink gumball machines that popped up around Manhattan and Brooklyn has been revealed. They were installed in promotion of Strokes’s drummer Fabrizio Moretti’s new project called machinegum. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

“”Go back to Iowa, you go back to Ohio. New York City belongs to the people that were here and made New York City what it is,” is a fine thing for your local loon to scream on a corner, but not for Eric Adams, the current borough president of Brooklyn and mayoral hopeful in 2021. The comments came at an event in Harlem about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s impact, where more than a few speakers spoke about gentrification without weirdly xenophobic comments. He followed it up with “I’m a New Yorker. I protected this city. I have a right to put my voice in how this city should run.” (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

Internal emails show that New York City’s special drug prosecutor has a database of police officers with potential honesty problems. Similar databases from the DA’s office from each of the five boroughs’ offices have been released thanks to Freedom of Information requests. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

Video: Inside Staten Island’s secret Chinese Scholar’s Garden. (ActionKid)

The Union Square Coffee Shop neon “COFFEE” sign was replaced with a Chase bank sign. (EV Grieve)

Apartment Porn: Go inside this $4 million custom build Williamsburg penthouse loft apartment. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Gospel Missionary Baptist Church was booted from West 149th Street near Riverside Drive after a foreclosure sale, despite more than two decades in the neighborhood, thanks to a foreclosure sale due to unpair condo fees. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

89.5% of jaywalking tickets in 2019 went to blacks and Hispanics and the city’s politicians are taking notice of the seemingly racist enforcement by the NYPD. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The home of “The Original Spaghetti Donut” is coming to Smith St in Brooklyn. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

An interview with the New York Knicks’ Reggie Bullock about Pride Night at MSG and his LGBTQ activism since the murder of his transgender sister Mia. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The city’s 30 most dangerous school zones for pedestrians and cyclists. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

You know what’s better than camera enforcement of cars blocking bus lanes? Streets without cars. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Video: Watch the day turn to night behind lower Manhattan in a time lapse. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

After two water main breaks in one week caused extensive delays across the MTA, the MTA announced they’ll be examining the infrastructure in hopes of avoiding similar situations in the future. They also put blame on the city for slow response times to the broken water mains. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

In praise of the long dessert menu. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The secrets of Pete Burdette, the elder statesman of the city’s comedy club barkers who always keeps a rubber chicken in his pocket. (Alex Taub for NY Times)

Central Park’s Great Lawn began its existence not as a place to exercise or relax, but as a symbol of crippling poverty during the Great Depression. (Sam Neubauer for I Love the Upper West Side)

Nightmare: Your AirPods Pro headphone falls out of your ear and down a sidewalk grate. What do you do? Here’s how to get them back. (Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

The best speakeasy-themed bars in the city. (Amber Sutherland-Namako for Thrillist)

The Briefly for November 25, 2019 – The “We Have A Heart, Also You’re Under Arrest” Edition

The mayor’s Rockefeller Center pedestrian plaza plans meets resistance, where to eat on Thanksgiving, Bloomberg gets into the race, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This week’s late night subway disruptions end on Wednesday night, because holiday schedules start on Thursday. (Subway Weekender)

It’s that time of year again, time to start speculating if weather will ground the Thanksgiving Day Parade balloons. (CNN)

Construction injuries were up 61% last year and the city is mobilizing its inspectors to make surprise visits to the largest construction sites to crack down on dangerous conditions and it seems to be working. Injuries are down 26% this yer. The team of 38 has carried out 10,256 surprise inspections and that still only covers a quarter of active construction sites. (NY Times)

Portraits of the city’s Black vegan movement from Black VegFest. (Civil Eats)

FedEx’s delivery robots have made their way to Lower Manhattan. (Gothamist)

It’s hard enough to figure out what is temperature appropriate to wear on a daily basis in the city when the outside temperature is below freezing, some subway platforms are roughly 85 degrees, and your average office temperature fluctuates between chilly and uncomfortably cold, let along if you’re moving from California. Welcome to New York Joan Summers, none of us know how to dress in New York City. (Jezebel NYC)

The NYPD’s Chief of Transit is committed to go on a four borough “tour” to meet with subway vendors and community members to show that transit cops “have a heart.” (Gothamist)

Those same NYPD transit cops gave Matthew Chavez, the creator of the “Subway Therapy” project, a ticket for his post-it note-based project which has been going for over two years without incident in the tunnel between 6th and 7th Aves in the 14th St subway stop. (Gothamist)

NYPD transit cops pinned a homeless woman to the ground and handcuffed her in another disturbing video made public by passersby. The mayor’s office claims the woman was being sent to a hospital as a part of the MTA’s “homeless outreach.” Weird how helping someone with a mental illness looks a lot like arresting them. (Gothamist)

Protests against the NYPD’s policing of the subways briefly shut down the 125th St stop on the 4/5/6 on Friday night. (amNewYork)

Photos from the protest, which resulted in 58 arrests. (The Independent)

The Coney Island subway station is roofed with solar panels, but they’ve been off-line since in 2012. When installed, the panels were supposed to cut back on 17,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions over 40 years. That is, of course, if they are operational. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city will shut down Fifth and Sixth Aves surrounding Rockefeller Plaza to cars for portions fo the day from Thanksgiving to January in hopes of relieving sidewalk congestion and forcing automobile traffic to find another way around the neighborhood. This is the plan that the Department of Transportation announced last month and the mayor said wasn’t yet approved. (NY Times)

The FDNY has “deep health and safety concerns” about the pedestrian plaza plan, claiming it will make it harder to get around the area due to rerouting of vehicles and that the mayor’s office didn’t adequately notify the local fire companies. (amNewYork)

The MTA isn’t happy with the plan either, due to the bus stops that will be bypassed during the hours the pedestrian plazas will be in operation. (Streetsblog)

The city’s reported HIV cases are at their lowest since the city started tracking them in 2001, with until 2000 cases reported in 2018. That number is 67% down from 2001. (amNewYork)

The NYPD agreed to give the Civilian Complaint Review Board access to body-cam footage except in the most serious cases. It sounds simple, but the actual agreement is ridiculous. There will be a “secure room” where one NYPD member will look for footage and one CCRB member will oversee. This is meant to get the CCRB footage without 10-25 days instead of the current 18-month backlog that exists. (Gothamist)

If you love Christmas more than anything else in this world, this Buddy the Elf-themed hotel room at the Midtown 45 is probably up your alley. (Time Out)

The NYPD took time to attend a Community Board 6 meeting to spread fear about the bail reforms kicking in starting in January. Bail reforms were signed into law in April. (Bronx Times)

The NYPD aren’t the only ones fear-mongering over bail reform. Republican State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, who represents Bay Ridge and a portion of Staten Island, is hopping on the scare train. Crime in New York has declined for 28 years straight and is at post-World War II levels. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Photos from the Harlem Light It Up parade. (amNewYork)

A LIRR train derailed on Friday night at Jamaica. There were no injuries, but the MTA is investigating what caused the derailment. This is the second derailment in that area on that track. (amNewYork)

With Mike Bloomberg getting into the presidential race, every NYC mayor since 1993 is or has run for president. Maybe David Dinkins has some ambitions we don’t know about. Either way, Bloomberg is in. (Patch)

Here’s his announcement video. (Bloomberg 2020)

A water main break caused flooding in Sunset Park on Sunday after a 30-foot wide crater opened up and shot out water for six hours. There were no injuries or major damage. (amNewYork)

The Coast Guard pulled 23 out of 32 ferries out of operation over “safety discrepancies” after annual inspections were performed on Sunday. Six ferries are back in the water. (amNewYork)

Someone posted a Times Square bomb threat to Reddit on Sunday morning. The threat was deemed not credible and the NYPD are investigating the post. (NY Times)

Where to go out for Thanksgiving dinner in NYC

Thanks to MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for November 21, 2019 – The “Raccoons Take Control, De Blasio’s MTA Influence Weakens” Edition

The best falafel, the city pays out $1 billion in lawsuits annually, Corey Johnson continues the tradition of playing politics with the budget, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Trash pandas rule the city’s parks at night, but now they are turning their little bandit-faced gaze towards becoming the kinds of the subterranean. Raccoon-related subway delays are up this year, way up. (Gothamist)

Let’s call it The Great Bell Blvd Oil Heist. The NYPD arrested Nigeme Rowe for stealing used oil from restaurants that put out the oil for recycling companies to be turned into biodiesel. (QNS)

The Daily News’ owners sold 25% of the company to the Tribune Company, the “destroyer of newspapers.” Sound promising. (Patch)

The city has paid $84.5 million annually to the victims of traffic violence caused by city employees in the Departments of Fire, Sanitation, Police, Transportation, and Parks. Add in all claims against the city? The number balloons to $1 billion. (Streetsblog)

The candy vendor arrested in a Harlem subway station last week plans to sue the city for $5 million for excessive force used by the four police officers who arrested him. (amNewYork)

The Queens DA will release its internal “credibility database” of cops who are suspected of lying in court. (Gothamist)

Are there enough places to buy coffee in NYC? Bandit is a new company that plans to open a coffee stand where you can buy a cup via their app with their eventual goal to be within a five minute walk from anyone who wants coffee. (Eater)

Broadway is Broadway, but Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway and smaller theaters far beyond still has a strong economical presence. Non-Broadway theater generates $584 million annually and employs 3,000 people according to a new study form the mayor’s office. (NY Times)

Five holiday decoration tips for small spaces, including the very sad “put branches in the shape of a tree on your wall.” (StreetEasy)

Lyft and the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) announced the formation of a new Equity Advisory Board for Citi Bike to discuss and evaluate Citi Bike’s equity strategy to better serve New York. (Curbed)

This look back at the history of 57th St starts with the quintessential Manhattan question: “Does anyone actually want to go to Midtown?” (Gothamist)

13 Brooklyn condos with the best waterfront views. (6sqft)

The case for ending free parking in NYC is getting stronger. (NY Times)

Here are the things that New Yorkers are looking for when they search for a new home. Here’s a hint: low crime and good light. (Localize Labs)

Add another name to the great fried chicken fight of 2019. From Philly, the latest contestant is Starliner in Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Evictions are down in Manhattan, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Queens, but not in the Bronx according to a new report issued by NYU’s Furman Center. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The Times is searching for stories about your neighborhood bodega. (NY Times)

Is your regular hookup becoming “a thing?” Here’s where to go when you’re not sure that your friend with benefits might want to have the “what ARE we?” talk. (The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio’s influence over the MTA is diminishing as one of his appointees, Veronica Vanterpool, is resigning from the MTA’s board. Vanterpool was also the youngest board member at 44 and its only woman of color. (Politico)

The MTA’s automated bus-mounted camera ticketing system is coming to the 14th St busway and will be online on December 2 and for the first sixty days, drivers will only receive a warning. (Gothamist)

Ten city zip codes are among the United States’ most expensive when it comes to home prices at numbers 5 and 8, respectively. Tribeca and Hudson Square broke through to the top ten. (Patch)

It seems that as long as you say you “didn’t realize” you hit and killed someone with your car, the NYPD will absolve you of wrongdoing. (Streetsblog)

A second New Yorker has died due to a vaping-related illness. (Patch)

More than two dozen homes in Dyker Heights have begun their annual Christmas light transformation. (Brooklyn Paper)

In September of 2018, the Department of Sanitation begun parking garbage trucks overnight on 10th between 1st and 2nd, which quite honestly sucks for the people who live on that block. It took 14 months, but State Senator Brad Hoylman and State Assemblymember Deborah J. Glick have introduced a bill that will prevent the DSNY from parking on residential streets. As a result, the DSNY has decided to move its trucks to Pier 42 for the next three months. (EV Grieve)

Starting next year, some buildings in the city will be required to display a letter grade, similar to restaurants, showing how energy efficient they are. (NY Times)

Is Corey Johnson using the City Council’s budget to reward his allies and make political deals? Yes. Has this been common practice in the City Council for long before Corey Johnson because the speaker? Also yes. (Politico)

NYC needs more weird, like Mother Pigeon, the bird woman artist and animal rights advocate who makes acrylic pigeon sculptures and sets them up in Union Square. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a celebration of Fet Gede in Downtown Brooklyn, the Haitian voodoo Festival of the Dead. (NY Times)

The best falafel in NYC. (Grub Street)

Thank you to MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!