The Briefly for April 11, 2019 – The “Not the Best Place to Live, Not Even Close” Edition

A Y2K-like bug brought down some of the city’s GPS systems, Pat Kiernan has a new podcast, MTA workers fight the upcoming L Project, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s favorite news anchor, Pat Kiernan, has a new podcast. (NY1)

The state senate unanimously passed the Religious Garb Act, which will allow the wearing of “any attire, clothing, or facial hair” protected under the Human Rights Law for religious purposes. (QNS)

US News & World Report released the 2019 best places to live and we’re… not #1. Are you insane? We’re 90 out of 125. If you want #1, go move to Austin. (NY Post)

Maybe traffic cameras should, you know, police traffic regulations. That’s what State Assembly Member Michael DenDekker is proposing by adding bicycle lane violations to what traffic cameras enforce. (Sunnyside Post)

Murderinos, this one has your name written all over it. An 80-year-old Queens man was arrested for a Virginia double murder from 1973. (Gothamist)

Turns out those protective sidewalk covers don’t do much when the whole damn building collapses on top of them. No one was hurt when it happened in Williamsburg, except a few cars and maybe a penny-farthing bicycle or unicycle. It’s Williamsburg after all. (Gothamist)

A pizzeria shakedown straight out of a Jon Stewart comedy routine, but it’s real and the “mobsters” are facing up to 20 years in prison. (Brooklyn Paper)

These marijuana entrepreneurs have HIGH hopes for legalization. Get it? HIGH HOPES! Ugh. (Gothamist)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

A guided dumpling crawl through Queens. (Eater)

After 35 years, bookbook on Bleecker Street will be closing. In order to stay open, the store would need a rent reduction and in 2019, that ain’t happening. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The five best grilled cheeses in the city. (Thrillist)

Foreclosures in the Bronx are up 28% in the first quarter of 2019. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s shortest bike lane has been found. (Brooklyn Paper)

This weekend’s “Blessing of the Rides” in Coney Island is a New York City annual tradition. Here’s what to expect from the egg cream christening to the blessing itself. (amNY)

A group of transit workers is calling the L Project’s (the new and crappy name for the non-shutdown) air quality into question with flyers saying the silica dust in the air is a danger to anyone who breathes it in. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez’ office broke up a gun trafficking ring after an undercover detective purchased three dozen guns, including automatic weapons. (amNY)

The Harlem School of the Arts will undergo a $9.5 million renovation that will begin in August and update the brutalist style exterior of the building with a glass wall, and make other welcome improvements. (NY Times)

There is no law dictating that your apartment be 80% covered with rugs, but most leases include it in a clause. What are the consequences for not complying? Well, that’s a little harder to define. (StreetEasy)

A look inside Manhattan’s first Ikea. It looks a lot like an Ikea, but you’re gonna look anyway. (Curbed)

The inevitable lawsuit over the city’s vaccine mandate has arrived. (Gothamist)

Why is there a 3,000 square foot bounce house in Dumbo? Because art, of course. (Time Out)

NYC is being afflicted by a Y2K-esque bug in some of its GPS systems. This is a once every twenty year GPS reset and city officials are being very tight-lipped about it. (NY Times)

What’s going on with the smoldering anus in Union Square? (Gothamist)

Saturday is Record Store Day, the most important holiday for the vinyl obsessed and for record store owners across the city. (amNY)

A look at City Hall Station, the unused subway station where the 6 train turns around which shows the grandeur of how the subways could have been. (NY Times)

The best neighborhoods for college grads. (Localize Labs)

Is removing stops the right way to make a bus route faster? Consider the case of the M14. (Bowery Boogie)

An interview with Carlo Scissura, the head of the new BQE expert panel. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Easter brunch spots.

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 2, 2019 – The “Most Expensive Toll Bridge in America is Not What You Think” Edition

Democrats are splintering over the state’s budget, the Pride March route, Harlem’s disappearing apartments, teens can’t legally vape, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Only 61.9% of New Yorkers participated in the 2010 census and to make sure more New Yorkers participate in 2020 the state cut the budget for the census in half. Oh wait, that doesn’t sound right. (Bklyner)

Nude sunrise yoga? Shockingly, we’re not talking about Bushwick. (LICTalk)

The “Clock Tower Buiding” in Tribeca needs a new name. The clock tower is being turned into a penthouse apartment. (Curbed)

The most expensive toll in America takes you to… Staten Island. (Patch)

Sorry, teens, no more vaping for you. In 120 days, the legal age to buy tobacco products, electronic cigarettes and liquid nicotine in New York will be raised from 18 to 21. (NY Post)

A disagreement over sick-leave will mean that the city’s fire engines may be left shorthanded, reducing some teams by 20%. (Patch)

The governor called the state budget the “greatest budget of the past decade,” but 17 Democrats in the state assembly voted against it because it was not progressive enough. (NY Times)

80% of the funds raised from congestion pricing will go towards MTA capital projects, with the remaining 20% being split between the LIRR and Metro North. (Curbed)

Today is one of six Equal Pay Days. (amNY)

Video: This is what the city’s war on electric bikes through the eyes of a Chinese delivery person. (Gothamist)

Rabbi Dovid Feldman is calling on City Councilmember Kalman Yeger to resign after his comment that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Brooklyn Paper)

Kalman Yeger has been removed from the City Council Committee on Immigration. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s new mansion tax will raise $365 million for the MTA. (6sqft)

No one is buying Mayor de Blasio’s claim to be reducing the city’s fleet of cars. (Streetblog)

AOC tweets, the NY Post has to write about it. (NY Post)

Congestion pricing may have passed, but the MTA is looking for technology solutions to implement it. (amNY)

David Blaine is the latest public figure to be under investigation from the NYPD for alleged sexual assault. (Gothamist)

Okay, so there was no legal weed in the state’s budget, but the governor is totally going to do it by June. (NY Post)

Watch: Can you tell the difference between New York pizza and a slice from a chain? (Viewing NYC)

Where to eat at Citi Field, where you can also find a baseball team playing sometimes. (Eater)

Harlem saw a decrease of 831 housing units despite an uptick in construction. Where are the apartments going? (Curbed)

The route for this year’s Pride March has been released, making a “U” starting at Madison Square Park heading down to the Stonewall Inn and coming back up 7th Ave to end at 23rd St. (The Villager)

If you’re on Roosevelt Island, avoid Octagon Field. Two dads and six kids were issued a summons for playing on the field. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Two former NYPD detectives who dodged rape convictions are asking a judge to ban the DNA evidence in that case from being used in the new one against them. (NY Post)

Hunts Point, the neighborhood that feeds NYC. (Streeteasy)

Michael Grimm, the current convicted felon and former member of Congress, is considering running for Congress again. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

21 ideal date-night restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for February 7, 2019 – The “Wait, What is a Pizza Sauna?” Edition

The Public Advocate debate, the porta-potty king, a rooftop glamping sauna, the NYPD targets Waze, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Watch the full Public Advocate debate or read the live blog. (NY1)

Amazon HQ2 was the common punching bag during the debate. (NY Post)

At 115 years, Maspeth’s Grant Street Bridge is ready for a makeover. (QNS)

The MTA’s 24% accessibility at subway stations should be embarrassing enough before the truth comes out about how those numbers are inflated. The subways are planned to be fully accessible by 2034 at a cost of $40 to $60 billion. (Curbed)

The BQX is taking a baby step forward. The city’s Economic Development Corporation is expected to approve a contract that will allow an environmental review. It’s only the first step of a $2.73 billion plan, which is what you might call “one full Amazon.” (Curbed)

This profile of the porta-potty king of New York City is full of crappy puns. (NY Mag)

The best bagels in Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

“Yes, I broke your window because Barack Obama was talking to me and I didn’t like what he was saying.” A perfectly understandable excuse for breaking the window of a Harlem adult shop. (Gothamist)

Lincoln Center has a new president. Henry Timms, who helped create #GivingTuesday, will leave the 92nd Street Y to take the position. (NY Times)

Releasing a banner buoyed by balloons into Grand Central Terminal is a pretty good way to make sure your protest can’t be easily removed. (Gothamist)

Waze is about to get less useful thanks to an . (NY Post)

Google to the NYPD: No thanks. (amNY)

The city is getting a pizza sauna. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The BronxCare Health System will repay sexual assault patients for illegally billing them for rape exams after settling a lawsuit by the NYAG’s office. (amNY)

The state legislature is looking to raise the prison minimum wage to $3/hour. Inmates work six hours a day, five days a week between $0.10 to $1.14/hour. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Pizza sauna not your thing? You could spend time in a sauna while glamping on the roof of a Williamsburg hotel. (Time Out)

Ever wonder how the city’s greenmarkets continue to have fresh produce in the winter? Here’s your answer. (amNY)

Is anyone surprised that the state’s police unions oppose legalizing marijuana? (NY Post)

The Astoria Boulevard N/W station will close for nine months starting in March as elevators are installed. (TimesLedger)

A look at The Pirates, an enclave of fans of of F.C. St. Pauli, a German anti-fascist soccer team. (NY Times)

8 highlights from the new Museum of the Dog. (Untapped Cities)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.