The Briefly for May 5, 2019 – The “Pole Dancing Rats Are So Last Week” Edition

The future of Sunnyside Yards, dollar oysters, the prettiest block in the city, Jeff Bezos buys an apartment, the appeal of a rear-facing apartment and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Is this a video of cops fighting each other in Harlem, or is it a video of people dressed as cops fighting each other in Harlem? That stupid question is what the NYPD would like you to ask. (Gothamist)

Rumors keep saying that New York City Transit president Andy Byford is on his way out the door. Someone tell Andy, because he reportedly just signed a new lease. (Gothamist)

Let’s not forget the cold history between the governor and Byford, who spend the first few months of the year never speaking to one another directly. (Second Ave Sagas)

Maybe Andy should leave. Governor Cuomo is cutting over three billion from the MTA budget over the next three years. (Daily News)

Pole dancing rats on the subway are so last week. This week it’s all about a loose bat on the F Train. (Gothamist)

The views ain’t great, the light is limited, but it’s hard to fight the appeal of a rear-facing apartment. (StreetEasy)

The Yemeni bodega owners’ protest of the New York Post has cost the newspaper an estimated $270,000 since the protest started two months ago. (The Indypendent)

Get ready wave hello to Rikers Island’s latest prisoner: Paul Manafort. (Patch)

The Death By Audio Arcade’s new home at Wonderville is open on the border of Bushwick and Bed-Stuy. Take a look at photos of the inside. (Gothamist)

Bumble is opening a cafe and wine in Soho this fall. According to Bumble, it’ll also be a place to hold business meetings and meet friends, so if you see a non-single friend in there, don’t freak out. (6sqft)

Apparently, NYC is a great place for a staycation. That’s a great suggestion because people keep dying on Mount Everest. (Patch)

Linda Fairstein, one of the lead prosecutors of the Central Park Five case, resigned her position at Vassar after a student petition with over 10,000 signatures was asking for her full removal. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’ve been asking yourself “electric mopeds, smart cars, bikes, what’s next?” San Francisco is about to receive rentable pogo sticks. (Curbed)

Rent is high, but at least we’re not San Francisco. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re pool hunting this summer, don’t forget to check out Roosevelt Island’s Manhattan Park Pool Club. (Curbed)

Bluestockings in the Lower East Side gets the Atlas Obscura treatment. (Atlas Obscura)

Pastis has reopened after a five-year hiatus. (NY Times)

He couldn’t get a three billion dollar tax break, but Jeff Bezos willing to pay $80 million for a 17,000 square foot apartment in 212 Fifth Ave. (The Real Deal)

10 important lighthouses in the city. Honestly, can you think of one lighthouse in the city? You’re probably surprised there’s enough for a list. (6sqft)

A brief history of SummerStage in Central Park. (Gothamist)

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams was arrested during a tenants-rights protest in Albany. (Patch)

Eight people have been arrested as part of the city’s crackdown of fake parking placards. Maybe next they’ll address abuse of legitimate placards. (amNY)

Declawing cats is now illegal in the state of New York. (NY Times)

The whole Governors Ball situation just keeps getting worse. The latest is accusations that the guards used excessive force. (BrooklynVegan)

Leonard Swanson, an NYPD officer, was suspended after allegedly choking his girlfriend on Monday night. (Gothamist)

Station Square: “The Prettiest Block in New York” (NY Mag)

2019 could be the busiest year for the city’s skyline. 16 towers are being planned or are currently under construction that top out at over 1,000 feet. To give perspective, there are currently only nine towers in the city at that height. (NY Times)

Could the Sunnyside Yards project become the next Hudson Yards? With a possible 24,000 new apartments built over the railroad yard decks, is a second Hudson Yards a reasonable idea for a borough that already has Long Island City’s luxury housing and could the project still happen without the inclusion of luxury housing? (The Indypendent)

Dollar oyster deals in the city, mapped. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 30, 2019 – The “I Don’t Have to Talk to You” Edition

Transgender activists will get a monument, a prison may become luxury apartments, this week’s commute from hell, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is getting safer, but pockets of Brooklyn are seeing spikes in violence. Is gang activity to blame? (NY Times)

“I don’t have to talk to you.” Why did Brooklyn Community Board 1 buy that $26,000 SUV? It doesn’t matter, because now the story is about Community Board 1’s district manager Gerald Esposito’s outburst when questioned about it at a board meeting this week. (The City)

One of the benefits of going to school at NYU is that you also get to live in one of the country’s most expensive rental markets. Oh what, that’s not a benefit. (Patch)

The Staten Island Wheel is the city’s zombie project. Now that it’s been dead for months, the city’s Economic Development Corporation is meeting with a new developer to work on the 630 foot tall Ferris wheel. (6sqft)

Electric scooters are still illegal, but rent-by-the-minute mopeds have arrived in Long Island City, Astoria, and multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods. (LIC Post)

We have the mayor mayor, the night mayor, and soon we may have the bike mayor. (Streetsblog)

If you’re a fan of events like The Squirrel Census, the Great Fish Count is looking for volunteers across the city. (6sqft)

Is this pole dancing rat the work of the enigmatic Zardulu? (Gothamist)

More on Zardulu. (Reply All)

In a move that seems too perfect for the nightmare dystopia the city’s real estate has become, a former prison in Harlem may soon become a series of luxury apartments. (The Root)

A guide to the city’s only observation decks. An easy guide because it comprises of all of them. (Curbed)

The “mechanical void” loophole has officially been closed by the city council. The short version of it was that developers were adding mechanical space in the middle of buildings to get around zoning laws to make the upper floors of their buildings as high as possible. (Curbed)

Three men were found guilty of “a sort of insurance fraud on steroids” that made them $31 million richer until they were caught. (Gothamist)

This week’s commuting hell belongs to 79th St, where the MTA closed all but one exit, causing overcrowding and five trainloads of people unable to leave the station. (Gothamist)

A few weeks after City Hall transferred city-owned land in the Bronx to a developer and approved $12 million in financing for an affordable apartment complex, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s political action committee received a $25,000 donation. (The City)

Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, pioneering transgender activists who were at the vanguard of the gay rights movement, will be immortalized in a monument that may be placed down the street from the Stonewall Inn. (NY Times)

Netflix’s mini-series on the Central Park Five is released on Friday, and with it will bring a flood of stories about the men at the center of the controversy and how they were targeted, hated, and abused by the city they called home and more specifically Donald Trump. (NY Times)

First, it was Trader Joe’s and now Whole Foods is following suit. 8 of the city’s 12 Whole Foods will stop making deliveries outside of what they refer to as the “walking zone” near their stores and are pushing customers to otherwise use Amazon’s ‘Prime Now’ app instead of visiting the store at all. (Tribeca Citizen)

Where to eat, but mostly where to avoid, at Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Governor Cuomo does not have any plans to lighten his grip on the state and just started his third term. He announced plans to run for a fourth term in office. The last governor of New York to serve four complete terms was George Clinton, New York’s very first governor in 1777. (Patch)

Katz’s is having a ‘When Harry Met Sally’ fake orgasm contest on the 30th anniversary of the film’s release. If you’ve been training for this your whole life, this is your moment. (Eater)

40 ideas for a birthday party for an adult. Calling it an “adult birthday party” sounds like it involves pornography. (Grub Street)

Can we have one week without someone intentionally trying to sabotage the subways? (Gothamist)

Tourism is up in the city and has taken Broadway’s box offices with it. 2018 was the ninth straight year of growth in the number of tourists, who make up 63% of the total 14,768,254 people attending Broadway shows, paying $1.8 billion for tickets. Other factors in Broadway’s growth include longer running shows, a wider variety of shows and a higher volume of them as well. And Hamilton, which grossed $165 million in ticket sales. (NY Times)

Infinity in a Tiny Room is an art show that takes place in an apartment, and no, this is not in Bushwick. (Patch)

The best Thai restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for April 11, 2019 – The “Not the Best Place to Live, Not Even Close” Edition

A Y2K-like bug brought down some of the city’s GPS systems, Pat Kiernan has a new podcast, MTA workers fight the upcoming L Project, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s favorite news anchor, Pat Kiernan, has a new podcast. (NY1)

The state senate unanimously passed the Religious Garb Act, which will allow the wearing of “any attire, clothing, or facial hair” protected under the Human Rights Law for religious purposes. (QNS)

US News & World Report released the 2019 best places to live and we’re… not #1. Are you insane? We’re 90 out of 125. If you want #1, go move to Austin. (NY Post)

Maybe traffic cameras should, you know, police traffic regulations. That’s what State Assembly Member Michael DenDekker is proposing by adding bicycle lane violations to what traffic cameras enforce. (Sunnyside Post)

Murderinos, this one has your name written all over it. An 80-year-old Queens man was arrested for a Virginia double murder from 1973. (Gothamist)

Turns out those protective sidewalk covers don’t do much when the whole damn building collapses on top of them. No one was hurt when it happened in Williamsburg, except a few cars and maybe a penny-farthing bicycle or unicycle. It’s Williamsburg after all. (Gothamist)

A pizzeria shakedown straight out of a Jon Stewart comedy routine, but it’s real and the “mobsters” are facing up to 20 years in prison. (Brooklyn Paper)

These marijuana entrepreneurs have HIGH hopes for legalization. Get it? HIGH HOPES! Ugh. (Gothamist)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

A guided dumpling crawl through Queens. (Eater)

After 35 years, bookbook on Bleecker Street will be closing. In order to stay open, the store would need a rent reduction and in 2019, that ain’t happening. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The five best grilled cheeses in the city. (Thrillist)

Foreclosures in the Bronx are up 28% in the first quarter of 2019. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s shortest bike lane has been found. (Brooklyn Paper)

This weekend’s “Blessing of the Rides” in Coney Island is a New York City annual tradition. Here’s what to expect from the egg cream christening to the blessing itself. (amNY)

A group of transit workers is calling the L Project’s (the new and crappy name for the non-shutdown) air quality into question with flyers saying the silica dust in the air is a danger to anyone who breathes it in. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez’ office broke up a gun trafficking ring after an undercover detective purchased three dozen guns, including automatic weapons. (amNY)

The Harlem School of the Arts will undergo a $9.5 million renovation that will begin in August and update the brutalist style exterior of the building with a glass wall, and make other welcome improvements. (NY Times)

There is no law dictating that your apartment be 80% covered with rugs, but most leases include it in a clause. What are the consequences for not complying? Well, that’s a little harder to define. (StreetEasy)

A look inside Manhattan’s first Ikea. It looks a lot like an Ikea, but you’re gonna look anyway. (Curbed)

The inevitable lawsuit over the city’s vaccine mandate has arrived. (Gothamist)

Why is there a 3,000 square foot bounce house in Dumbo? Because art, of course. (Time Out)

NYC is being afflicted by a Y2K-esque bug in some of its GPS systems. This is a once every twenty year GPS reset and city officials are being very tight-lipped about it. (NY Times)

What’s going on with the smoldering anus in Union Square? (Gothamist)

Saturday is Record Store Day, the most important holiday for the vinyl obsessed and for record store owners across the city. (amNY)

A look at City Hall Station, the unused subway station where the 6 train turns around which shows the grandeur of how the subways could have been. (NY Times)

The best neighborhoods for college grads. (Localize Labs)

Is removing stops the right way to make a bus route faster? Consider the case of the M14. (Bowery Boogie)

An interview with Carlo Scissura, the head of the new BQE expert panel. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Easter brunch spots.

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