The Briefly for February 27, 2020 – The “Who is the Most Powerful Person in New York City?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Staten Island’s rebellion against speed cameras, the F train is headed for construction, the Gowanus Canal cleanup, eating in Mott Haven, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 43˚
Light rain in the morning.

Central Park has a turtle problem. The red-eared slider turtle, technically listed as an invasive species, is having its run of Central Park and muscling out the park’s other species of turtles. How did they get there? They’re usually pets who are abandoned in the park because they’ve grown to an unmanageable size, or their humans weren’t ready for a potentially 50+ year commitment to their new shelled friend. (Sarah Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: See life in NYC from 1911 with this colorized and restored 4K footage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The 100 most powerful people in New York City. The mayor is #4, which seems high. No, I did not make the list as the person who runs The Briefly, maybe in 2021. (City and State)

Pedro Colon, 61, faces criminal charges after his bus hit Patience Albert, 10, and a 15-year-old boy on the corner of Wortman Avenue and Crescent Street in Brooklyn. The 15-year-old survived, Patience Albert did not. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Get ready for over a year’s worth of construction on the F train to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. The 14+ month job will also add cell service and wifi to the tunnel, so the next time you’re imprisoned by the MTA underneath the East River, you’ll also have to endure someone making a FaceTime call at the same time. Work is slated to start sometime later this year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s not time to freak out, but the coronavirus in the United States is “more of a question of exactly when this will happen” and not if, according to the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Here is how to prepare for coronavirus in NYC. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The mayor has been requesting the CDC allow New York City labs to test for coronavirus and that passengers arriving in NYC be screened for it. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

New York, as we know it, will no longer exist tomorrow. […] It’ll be the 1970’s all over again. People will get mean, the streets won’t be safe, graffiti everywhere, and movies will only cost three dollars.” -Tracey Jordan (30 Rock)

Here are NYC’s James Beard Awards semifinalists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

First Lady Chirlane McCray is considering running for Brooklyn Borough President. People of Brooklyn, I implore you to stop electing anyone in the de Blasio family into any public office in New York City. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A look back at the Depression-era shanty towns in New York City parks. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The NYPD is investigating police union boss Ed Mullins, the head of the Sergeants Benevolent Association. Mullins, who will never be accused of making the rational move, has taken to Facebook to declare “I WILL NOT BE SILENCED BY THE THREAT OF DISCIPLINE, NOW OR EVER!” This is a man who was quoted as saying “Ferguson Missouri was a lie,” declared war on the mayor, NYPD officers should stand “shoulder-to-shoulder” with ICE and the list goes on. The investigation is to see if his views undermine his capacity as a sergeant, where he earns a salary of $133,524. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

State Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron upheld an August 2019 ruling that four towers planned for the Lower East Side Two Bridges development cannot move forward. The ruling says the land-review process was illegally bypassed and that 2,775 new apartments and 2.5 million square feet of new space does not qualify as “minor modifications.” (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The MTA announced 1,800 planned job cuts on Wednesday, but hasn’t said where they are coming from or if they are part of the 2,700 job cuts announced in the summer. The agency is hoping to close the projected billion dollar plus deficit projected by 2023. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Harvey Weinstein may never see the inside of Rikers Island to avoid “another Epstein incident.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A look back on when Mayor Bloomberg wanted poor people to drink less soda. (Arthur Delaney for HuffPost)

Maybe Mayor Bloomberg should never have uttered “we treated our teachers the right way” during this week’s Democratic debate, because NYC’s teachers have the receipts. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Amazon continues to rent buildings across the city, this time it’s a 300,000 square foot space in Middle Village, taking over the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s former space. (Bill Parry for amNewYork Metro)

The Trump administration can withhold millions of dollars in law enforcement grants from so-called sanctuary jurisdictions that refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities, according to a ruling issued on Wednesday from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan, a break from three previous court rulings. NYC received about $4 million a year in law enforcement grants. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The City Council will consider a package of bills aimed at limiting how much food delivery apps like GrubHub and Seamless can charge restaurants. (Jeffery C. Mays and David Yaffe-Bellany for NY Times)

Staging a Broadway should is tough, staging a Broadway show in Madison Square Garden for 18,000 students is tougher. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Staten Islanders have been wrapping yellow ribbons around utility poles to indicate the presence of speed cameras. The argument of the Facebook group behind the effort is that the speed cameras are nothing more than a money grab from the city. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Most elected officials in Staten Island won’t be participating in the island’s St. Patrick’s Day parade because the parade’s organizers will not allow Staten Island’s largest LGBT to march. Republican State Assemblymembers Nicole Malliotakis and Mike Reilly have announced they will be marching, perhaps making the political decision that Staten Islanders hate the LGBT community more than they hate bigotry in general. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Here’s how the Gowanus Canal clean-up will proceed. (Pardon Me for Asking)

Where to eat in Mott Haven. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Camila for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 7, 2020 – The “Saving Penn Station and a Guy on the BQE” Edition

Today’s daily NY news digest: Amazon’s HQ2 deal for LIC was $800 million sweeter than we previously knew, the Queens boro president special election date is set, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 44˚
Possible light rain in the evening and overnight.

The first Monday of 2020 saw an unprecedented meltdown of the MTA’s ability to get us all to work. 12 of 22 possible subway lines were experiencing major delays. Happy Monday everyone! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

What caused the delays? In the 7 train’s case it was “an isolated case of human error.” Don’t forget that the MTA will still write you a late note for work if you ask for it. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

New York City’s greatest export is garbage. Literal garbage. In 2018, over 680 thousand tons (over 1.3 billion pounds) of garbage from NYC was exported to Seneca Meadows, NY, a 270+ mile drive from Manhattan. Over half a million tons were sent to Morrisville, PA, a 70+ mile journey. Businesses, stores and restaurants recycle 24% of the time, construction recycles 50%, and residential homes only hit 18% of a maximum 68%. The mayor promised to reduce the city’s trash exports by 90% in 2018 and trash exports went up in 2019. (Sally Goldenberg and Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Governor Cuomo has a plan for Penn Station. He plans to add 40% capacity to everyone’s favorite train station. The expansion of Penn Station into the Post Office building will do nothing to increase its capacity, so the governor plans to add eight tracks to service an additional 175,000 riders each day. This all hinges on the state buying or taking a city’s block worth of land between 30th and 31st between Seventh and Eighth Aves. That block is has businesses and apartments, and land owned by the Archdiocese of New York and Amtrak. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Perhaps the Penn Station expansion can help out New Jersey’s newest form of tourism: people taking a train from New York to make sports bets using their phones over the New Jersey border. (Christopher Palmeri for Bloomberg, thanks to reader Timothy for sending this in)

The governor had a busy day with his speech announcing the Penn Station upgrades followed by literally pulling a trapped man out of a crashed van on the BQE. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The governor isn’t the only good samaritan in the city. Shaq helped a woman who has fallen at the intersection of Pitt and East Houston. (EV Grieve)

What’s $800 million between a giant corporation that pays $0 in taxes and the City of New York? Turns out the sweet deal the mayor and governor tried to give Amazon had $2.5 billion of incentives, $800 more than previously reported. (The Real Deal)

Pro wrestling runs in Ridgewood’s roots. In the modern day, House of Glory calls it home, but the pedigree runs back to the New Ridgewood Grove Arena, the WWF, Bruno Sammartino and Andre the Giant. (The Old Timer for QNS)

Pier 76 sits behind the Javits Center and is currently an NYPD tow yard, but thanks to Governor Cuomo the pier will be added to the Hudson River Park Trust later this year. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Food delivery workers with electric bikes had to worry about the NYPD confiscating their bikes as part of the mayor’s anti-electric bike crusade. Now, since September, 24 workers’ bikes have been stolen, each costing as much as $2,000. (Sarah Maslin Nir and Jeffrey E. Singer for NY Times)

Video: Walking through Yorkville, from 97th to 74th on York Ave. (ActionKid)

There are 12 Human Trafficking Intervention Courts in New York, aimed at intervention and sending people to counseling instead of prison. Six years into their operation, there is criticism that they are not living up to their promise. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Could you identify this tribute to the 1939 World’s Fair on a building in Queens without being told what it was? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Yes, this is a story about another ice skating rink in the city, but this one is a synthetic rink. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: During the renovation of Moishe’s on Second Ave, removing some walls revealed beautiful 100-plus-year-old tile work behind the dummy walls constructed in the 70s. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Evictions are down nearly 20 percent since new rent laws were enacted last June. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

The Harvey Weinstein trial started on Monday. Always an imitator, Los Angeles announced its own case against Weinstein. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Anish Kapoor bean sculpture at 56 Leaonard’s construction continues as we’re currently at half bean. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There will be a special election on March 24 to elect a new Queens borough president after former President Melinda Katz assumed her new position as Queens DA. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

9 ways to embrace winter in Brooklyn. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Kal Penn, who recently starred in NBC’s ‘Sunnyside,’ endorsed City Councilperson Jimmy Van Bramer for Queens President. Penn was also the Associate Director in the White House Office of Public Engagement under the Obama administration. (Kristen Torres for LIC Post)

The husband to state Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie’s chief of staff was arrested Monday for conspiring to import cocaine, according to a source and court records. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Sometimes we can assume that New York has everything. When faced with the news that Sip N’ Play, a board game cafe, has opened in Park Slope, we can be sure we’ve hit all the checkmarks. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Quick tip: The NYPD is warning against abbreviated 2020 as “20” on checks, as it could be an invitation for fraud. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

A little bit more on some of the owners of land that Governor Cuomo wants to take to expand Penn Station. (Rich Bockmann and Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

The state’s new bail laws aren’t even a week old, but thanks to the recent anti-Semite attacks some state lawmakers are considering amending it so those accused of hate crimes could be held on bail. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Where to have a last minute group dinner. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 18, 2019 – The “AOC vs Cuomo Round 2: The NYPD Subway Surge” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio has another new approach for the city’s homeless population, the hoax that led to an AMBER alert, the most expensive street on the planet, & more

Today – Low: 17˚ High: 37˚
Clear throughout the day.

Search for “de Blasio” “homeless” and “new approach.” Here are some highlights you’ll find:
– Jan 2015: “Shifts Strategy on Homeless Help”
– Dec 2015: “The most comprehensive street homeless outreach effort.”
– Apr 2016: “sweeping homelessness reforms”
– Feb 2017: A “blood and guts” war on homelessness.
– Dec 2017: “playing catch-up on unsheltered homelessness.”
– Mar 2018: an “innovative solution to the crisis.”
– Dec 2019: A new approach addressing street homelessness. (Mark Hellum for amNewYork)

Cluster sites are temporary apartments for the homeless in privately owned buildings and the mayor announced in 2016 that he would end the practice of using them by 2019. There are still 3,000 units of cluster housing in the city. Many nonprofits that operate cluster sites have hundreds or thousands of open violations, and continue to get business from the city despite it. (Joan Goldberg for Brooklyn Eagle)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was one of the leading voices in the effort that killed Amazon’s HQ2. Can AOC help the fight against Governor Cuomo’s NYPD surge in the subways? (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

When the United States misses its targets to reduce climate emissions, New York won’t be on the list of states that caused it to happen. (Aaron Short for Streetsblog)

The best Chinese food on the Upper West Side. (Acrienne Cooper for I Love the Upper West Side)

The scumbag of the week award goes to FDNY lieutenant Christopher Hughes, who was caught stealing from a charity event at a Catholic school fundraiser on Staten Island. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo seeks to redefine conditions under which a person is capable of giving consent, specifically in when someone is drunk. In a steady stream of announcements like a legislative “12 Days of Christmas” the governor has been unveiling one proposal a day leading up to his 2020 State of the State address. (Sarah Midkiff for Refinery29)

Revisiting Le Bernardin, “one of the city’s most thrilling and technically astute restaurants.” (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Everyone got the AMBER alert on Tuesday (unless you’re a monster and turned them off) for Karol Sanchez, who was kidnapped in the Bronx. A few hours later we found out it was a hoax set up by Sanchez as part of a feud with her mother, who she deems to be overprotective. (Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The video for All I Want for Christmas is You has a New York connection, it was filmed in front of the iconic “Bronx Christmas House.” Unfortunately this year the house is dark for the first time in 46 years. (Ed Garcia Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Harvey Weinstein, NYC’s resident goblin, claims his back hurts too much to deal with a lawsuit to recoup a $45 million loan from him. What a tough year this much have been for him. 🙄 (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The LES, Sunset Park, Gowanus and the rest of the six NYC neighborhoods poised for major change in 2020. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The most expensive street not he planet is 57th St, aka Billionaire’s Row. It end one of four Manhattan streets in the top ten. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Mail-order iconic foods, the foie gras debates, bowl restaurants and all the restaurant trends Adam Platt never wants to see again. (Adam Platt for Grub Street)

There is a second legal fight against an apartment complex that would cast a literal shadow over the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. A lawsuit is looking to overturn the City council’s approval and force the developer to do an Environmental Impact Survey. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Falling building debris fatally crushed a 60-year-old woman on West 49th Street and Seventh Avenue in Manhattan on Tuesday morning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA gave a “sneak peek” at a complete redesign of Queens’ bus system on Monday night with an eye towards less redundancy, easier transfers, and more inter borough options. The full book on the redesign will be released in the spring of 2020. (Angelica Acevedo for amNewYork)

New York City has agreed to pay $12.5 million dollars to settle a class action lawsuit by people who were subject to invasive strip searches while visiting loved ones in jail. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

The 24-hour NYC diner isn’t dead. Say hello to the new Soho Diner. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Attention NYC Millennials: The suburbs want you! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Here’s how the local centrists in Congress will vote on the impeachment. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A defense lawyer suggested detectives had badgered and yelled at a 13-year-old boy before he admitted participating in the fatal mugging of Tessa Majors. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The NYPD will encrypt their radios in 2020, cutting off press from real time reporting and also essentially killing how the Citizen app, Scanner 911, and Broadcastify get their reports. The move seems to fly in the face of the city’s attempts at making the NYPD more transparent and accountable. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

The hidden fees in no fee apartments. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork)

NYPD arrested a truck driver who they say fatally struck bicyclist Matt Travis in East Harlem last month and left the scene. (Eyewitness News)

Time Out New York’s 20 best dishes of 2019. (Bao Ong for Time Out)