The Briefly for February 6, 2020 – The “No More Paying Brokers Fees For Rentals” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo targets bridges for fare evasion, Prada settles a blackface lawsuit, where to eat in Industry City, High Maintenance, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 45˚
Rain throughout the day.

Everything you need to know about New York’s new plastic bag ban. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is the “Molten Chocolate Body Scrub” weird or soothing with its cocoa scrub and chocolate mask? It’s both. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is it better to rent or buy in NYC? There’s no one answer for anyone in the city. (Ameena Walker)

Landlord, not tenants, will now be forced to foot the bill for New York City’s notoriously high brokers fees, following new guidance issued by the NY Department of State. Maybe renting IS better! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Apartments without roommates with rent under $1,800 actually exist in the city, and here’s five of them. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

There have been no confirmed cases of coronavirus in the city but two more people have been quarantined due to a possible infection. This brings the total number of currently suspected cases to four, the first case was determined not to be coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A jackass in Chinatown attacked a mask-wearing woman in what is being investigated as a hate crime by the NYPD and the Hate Crime Task Force. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

You’ve got until February 13th if you want to put yourself into the lottery for the NYC Marathon. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

A year after Amazon cried its way back to Seattle, the Queens Chamber of Commerce has launched its “Relocate to Queens” campaign. (Bill Parry for QNS)

A 24-year-old man from Oklahoma allegedly stumbled into New York City, visited a guy he met on a dating app, killed him, and blew the slain man’s money all over the city, according court documents from the Manhattan district attorney’s office. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Governor Cuomo’s Penn Station plan, by the numbers. (C.J. Hughes for The Real Deal)

Governor Cuomo is taking his fare evasion road show to the state’s bridges and tunnels, making evading a bridge toll to misdemeanor “theft of services.” Any Churro vendors on the Throggs Neck Bridge better watch out. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Welcome to the stretch of I-95 from the George Washington Bridge and stretching into the Cross Bronx Expressway, the fifth most dangerous spot in the nation for car crashes. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Signs for the Verrazzano Bridge have never been spelled correctly, thanks to an error on the contract for the bridge’s construction. That has been corrected. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

In an effort to fight postpartum depression, every first-time parent in New York City will soon be eligible to receive as many as six home visits from professionals for postnatal mental health care. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

New York City’s Department of Education consistently failed to follow requirements for annual lead-paint inspections in schools over the last five years, records show. No shit. (Christopher Werth for Gothamist)

An interview with the creators of High Maintenance on the fourth season of the show on keeping the show fresh, their collaboration with This American Life, Larry Owens, and more. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Restaurant workers are protesting the $15 minimum wage. Why? Because Governor Cuomo has twice raised the minimum wage to $15 for “everybody” and excluded them twice. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Meet the women behind Monumental Women, the group behind Central Park’s first statue of a woman. (Currie Engel for NY City Lens)

Two gangs from Brooklyn who are said to be responsible for at least 13 shootings, homicides and other crimes, were charged in a 122-count indictment after cops arrested 34 members and seized 16 guns in “Operation Boxed In.” The gangs were named, and this is seriously their names, the Wooo and the Choo. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Prada has agreed to a “groundbreaking” restorative justice agreement with the NYC Commission on Human Rights after using blackface imagery in their products and displays in their stores. They’ll create a scholarship and paid internship for racial minorities, make a commitment to recruit underrepresented employees, appoint a diversity officer, and everyone in the company will undergo racial equality training. This would be commendable if it wasn’t being forced on them as part of settling a lawsuit. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Manny Teixeira is the city’s longest-serving doorman, working in the same building since 1965., taking over for his father. (CBS New York)

Arthur Schwartz, the attorney for loud and angry wealthy white boomers and the man who tried to stop the 14th St busway, has turned his attention towards attempting to stop the East Side Coastal Resiliency project’s installation of a seawall in East River Park. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Tanay Warerkar, Erika Adams, and Luke Fortney for joining the team at Eater. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio’s approval rating is lower than President Trump’s. He’s a lame duck with two years to go. His presidential campaign was DOA. Can the mayor do anything to excite New Yorkers again? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio pushed back against a story from President Trump’s State of the Union that claims New York’s sanctuary city policy led to the murder of a Queens woman, accusing the president of trying to “exploit” the victim’s death. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The Strand is coming to the location of the now closed Book Culture on the Upper West Side. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

From March of 1965: Burying Malcolm X (Marlene Nadler for Village Voice)

The case of who killed Malcom X may be reopened 55 years after his death. (John Leland for NY Times)

Where to eat in Industry City. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 13, 2019 – The “Staten Island Revisits Secession from New York City” Edition

The city’s first hair discrimination case is settled, Penn Station is about to get worse, a 22.5-foot arm appears in Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Queens has a new Boulevard of Death, and it’s Jewel Ave. (Streetsblog)

The first hair discrimination case in the city has been resolved. Sally Hershberger and partner Sharon Dorram lost a $70k lawsuit after former workers were told that their hairstyles didn’t fit a dress code, specifically that “afros and box-braid hairstyles did not reflect the upscale image of the neighborhood.” (The Root)

Staten Island wants to secede from NYC. (Gothamist)

Penn Station’s multi-year renovation means that the already depressing station will become even more dour when it loses about 17 businesses including Shake Shack, Magnolia Bakery, two Starbucks, a Pretty and Godiva. (Eater)

Can an opinion be wrong? In the case of the “Can We Talk About Womanspreading?” opinion piece that ran in the Daily News, the answer is yes. Claire Lampen read it, so you don’t have to. (Gothamist)

Last night’s sunset was spectacular. (@mikiodo)

What’s the point of adding 500 cops to the subways to police fare evasion? Rationally minded folks aren’t the only ones asking that question, the MTA’s board is also starting to ask that same question. (Gothamist)

More cops of better service? The number of crimes on the subway are down, no matter what fantasy Governor Cuomo wants to create to justify spending more than half a billion dollars on new subway cops. The governor if you ask 100 people on the subway if they want more cops on the subways, 75 would say yes, so amNewYork went down and started asking. (amNewYork)

Dr. Sun Yat-sen received a monument in Chinatown at Columbus Park, adding Dr Sun’s name to the park’s plaza as well. He was a pioneer in the reform of China in 1911 and the monument has “All Under Heaven Are Equal” inscribed on the pedestal. (amNewYork)

This week is the best week for forest bathing. What’s forest bathing? I don’t really know. It’s kind of like taking a walk in the trees but different? (Gothamist)

The East Side Costal Resiliency (ESCR) project is headed for a full City Council vote on Thursday, which will decide the future of the East River Park and how the Lower East Side is protected from storms and the rising sea. (Curbed)

There are 40 NYCHA developments without gas, some without gas since April. City Comptroller Scott Stringer argues that if gas is not supplied for an extended period of time that the NYCHA should be offering food reimbursement and monthly bill abatements to compensate. (amNewYork)

Is the one minute you can spend inside the “Infinity Mirrored Room” at David Zwirner in Chelsea worth the potentially very long wait? (NY Times)

Looking for restaurants serving Thanksgiving dinner this year? (Patch)

How to choose an apartment based on the school district. (StreetEasy)

With the help of Lin-Manuel Miranda and some Hamilton collaborators, the Drama Book Shop will be opening its new location on W 39th in the spring and operated by the company that operates Hamilton’s gift shop. (NY Times)

Third Ave in Sunset Park between 20th and 30th Streets underneath the Gowanus Expressway is becoming a hub for RV parking. (amNewYork)

A rezoning in Woodside was given the thumbs up by Community Board 2 that will bring 60 apartments to 52nd St near Queens Blvd with parking, a community facility, and commercial space. (Sunnyside Post)

Last weekend saw a spike in hate crimes reported in Brooklyn, most anti-Semitic in nature. (amNewYork)

The National Grid / Governor Cuomo war of words hasn’t ended. The governor once again raised the threat of revoking National Grid’s license to operate in the southern part of the state. (NY Times)

Someone broke into the conductor cab on a 1 train and bean screaming “I have a fucking gun!” into the train’s PA system. Chaos ensued, as you might expect, but no one was found with a gun and no injuries were reported. (Gothamist)

RIP Charlie Gordon. Astoria’s Sandwich King, who established Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli in Astoria. (LIC Post)

Unity is a 22.5-foot bronze sculpture of an arm pointing towards the sky in Downtown Brooklyn by Hank Willis Thomas. The piece is “in homage to, and celebration of, the unique and multifaceted character of the borough of Brooklyn. There is one finger raised, but it’s not the Brooklyn salute you might assume. It’s the index finger. (Untapped New York)

Hall & Oates is hitting the road and MSG is on their list for February 28. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Single-Story Project,” from Adam Friedberg on view at the Center for Architecture captures 100 one-story buildings in the East Village and Lower East Side. It seems almost impossible that with the city as dense as it is that there are that many one-story buildings remaining. (Curbed)

Take a look inside Norah Jones’ $8 million circa-1843 Cobble Hill home, which includes a master suite terrace and a hot tub and pool in the backyard. (Curbed)

Are your neighbors’ security cameras spying on you? (NY Times)

The hottest restaurants in Queens this month. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 9, 2019 – The “Attacked by a Metal Banjo” Edition

New York’s new license plates have been chosen, a new tomato plant grows on the East River, the Port Authority’s new bus depot comes up short, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This week’s late-night subway service change lottery losers are the 3, 4, 6, A, F, N, and Q trains. And always the L train. (Subway Weekender)

This is our new license plate. (Patch)

For the people who loved the tomato plant discovered along the East River, here’s some good news: there is another. (NY Times)

The Charging Bull was attacked with a metal banjo. (NY Times)

It’s a nasty cycle. Bus service degrades to a point where walking will get you where you need to be faster. As a result of the poor service, ridership declines. The MTA doesn’t see the cause, just the effect, and along routes like the B38 and B54, they cut service to match the lowered demand. Now with the degraded service, the buses are still slow, still unreliable and now there are less of them. The MTA can’t fix the problems with the buses because that’s the Department of Transportation’s street designs and the NYPD’s lack of enforcement of what can make traffic flow easily and keep the streets safe for vehicles pedestrians and cyclists. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Friends (The worst show to celebrate in the age of Trump) experience pop-up on Mercer Street is all sold out, so some photos of the inside are all you’ll get unless more tickets become available. (Gothamist)

Bill de Blasio’s campaign for president hopefully ends on October 1st and someone should throw a party in celebration, especially if it means the mayor will stop doing things like show up on Tucker Carlson’s show looking for anyone who will support him. (Gothamist)

277 people leave New York for good every day, making it the #1 city people want to leave in the country. (Bloomberg)

Here comes fall, which means here comes food festivals. (6sqft)

The Apple cube is back on 5th Ave, and it’s trippy as hell. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority presented some of its ideas to replace the Port Authority Bus Terminal, and none of them accommodated services like Megabus, which use the sidewalks of midtown for their pickups and dropoffs, into their plans. There was worry that the Port Authority would eventually screw up replacing the bus terminal, and they are already meeting expectations. (Gothamist)

Digging in on bad ideas is now a hallmark of the mayor’s public statements. (Streetsblog)

Here are this week’s restaurants shut down by the Department of Health, including Tasty Popcorn Chicken in Queens with a whopping 121 violation points. (Patch)

New Yorkers already received over 1.25 billion robocalls this year. (Patch)

The 5 Boro Pizza Challenge is an attempt to eat a slice of pizza in every borough in one day, only using public transportation. Think you have what it takes? (6sqft)

Take a look inside Bette Midler’s $50 million penthouse, which is for sale. (Curbed)

New York will soon get more Detroit-style pizza when Michigan chain Jet’s Pizza sets up its first outpost on Ninth Ave between 17th and 18th St. (Eater)

Last Thursday set the record for the most Citi Bike rides in a day with 90,000. (Streetsblog)

The historic boardwalk in Coney Island is landmarked, but still bears scars from Superstorm Sandy. If you walk west on the boardwalk, past the amusement zone, you’ll encounter a section of plywood boards that freeze over in the winter. You’ll see nails sticking up, you’ll see missing boards, plants growing through, and other hazards. Residents are sick of it and are demanding change. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The governor is flirting with the idea of holding the 2020 New York presidential primaries to February, one day after the Iowa caucuses. (NY Times)

Texting while crossing the street is safe, according to a new study by the Department of Transportation. Remember this the next time some old fuddy-duddy tries to argue otherwise. (NY Times)

Joe Namath is selling his (empty) $1.19 Upper West Side duplex. (I Love the Upper West Side)

There are more hate crimes against black people in NYC this year, but there were more arrests in cases with hate crimes against white people, according to numbers released by the NYPD. (Patch)

A look at five new restaurants in the city. (amNY)

A Times Square Elmo was arrested for groping a teenage girl. (Pix 11)

The history of Central Park’s Shakespeare Garden. (Ephemeral New York)

15 places to try when the company is picking up the tab for lunch. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!