The Briefly for September 13 – 14, 2020 – The “A Bat Is In Your Home. What Do You Do?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The UWS hates the homeless, the 1st Covid-19 school shutdown, the Village Halloween parade is canceled, reactions to indoor dining, & more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Dr. Anthony Fauci said a vaccine would need to exist for nearly a year before people might feel comfortable returning to theaters unmasked, which he said would likely be mid to late 2021. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

Flying military planes over NYC on 9/11 is pretty high on the list of 2020’s stupidest ideas and 2020 is a banner year for stupid ideas. It was canceled on request of the city after Mayor de Blasio admitted he didn’t know it was happening. That guy really has his finger on the pulse. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Village Halloween Parade is canceled. It was inevitable yet still sad. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

167 CEOs and corporate bosses wrote the mayor an open letter, asking him to take action on crime and quality of life issues or else “people will be slow to return.” It was signed by the CEOs of Lyft, Warby Parker, and the WNBA among others. Not only is their message extremely deaf to the moment, but they are also asking the mayor to be a leader, which is something he has proven he’s not. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The letter is 242 words and of these business leaders “need to send a strong, consistent message that our employees, customers, clients and visitors will be coming back to a safe and healthy work environment.” These are economic descriptions of people, not how you talk about your family, friends, and neighbors. These millionaires do not offer support for a city that is facing an economic crisis, they demand action from someone else. They want everyone to come back to their offices but haven’t said how they’ll protect us. They want our support for their cause but use the language of the president when describing our streets. (J. David Goodman, Emma G. Fitzsimmons, and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Upper West Siders banded together and hired a lawyer to expel the “scum,” “trash,” and “thugs” in their neighborhood. On Facebook, they discussed an armed uprising and how they could use wasp spray and dog shit against them. They hung a noose outside of where this “scum” was living. They even convinced the mayor to move them. Who was their enemy? Homeless New Yorkers. (Gwynne Hogan and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor’s decision to remove 300 homeless New Yorkers from a shelter on the UWS has cascading effects that will force 900 New Yorkers in shelters to be moved to accommodate the change. The personal stories of the city treating people like objects that can easily be moved around are heartbreaking, but at least those people on the Upper West Side are happy. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The Legal Aid Society has plans to sue the city over the “knee-jerk capitulation” over the ejection. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

There are bats in all five boroughs. Here’s what to do if a bat gets into your home. Step one: Impossibly, stay calm. (Christopher Mele for NY Times)

A senior advisor to Chancellor Richard Carranza, Alison Hirsh, has resigned her post from the Department of Education. She left the mayor’s office in June after the NYPD’s treatment of Black Lives Matter protesters. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s the story of how a 19-year-old in federal custody ended up hiding behind a loom in someone’s apartment in Sunset Park. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

SNL is returning on October 3. There’s been no word on guests, hosts, or audiences. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Congrats to Abeda Khanam, a teacher at Robert F. Wagner High School in Long Island City, for being named state Senator John Liu’s Woman of Distinction for 2020. (QNS)

Local Law 1932-A suspends enforcement of the personal-liability provision in commercial leases of COVID-impacted tenants and it’s set to expire on September 30, but City Council has plans of extending it through March of 2021. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: The Trump Statues Initiative, which is bringing “living performance pieces” to the city’s streets, like “The Final Push” which features a “gold” President Trump in a golf cart being pushed by Laura Ingram and Sean Hannity over headstones. (Untapped New York)

NYC is now home to the world’s first-ever Makeup Museum. It’s now open with its debut exhibition “Pink Jungle: 1950’s Makeup in America.” (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea posted a photo to Twitter of the top brass of the NYPD and officers openly violating the state’s mask and event mandates at an indoor gathering with over 50 people inside police headquarters. The mayor called it “a mistake that needs to be rectified going forward.” (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A stroll through Pomander Walk, the city’s most exclusive street. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I Love NY is looking for volunteers to give foliage reports each week. Leaf peeper wanted! (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Education confirmed there were 19 positive Covid-19 tests in city schools among teachers with two in one school, triggering an automatic 24 closure. Students don’t return until September 21. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

A look at Chloë Bass’s outdoor art exhibition “Wayfinding” in St. Nicholas Park. (Brian Boucher for NY Times)

A look at an unlikely for crime detterance: More pools. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

“Even with these ongoing concerns, expanded outdoor dining is … nice. Freed of these unnerving matters, expanded outdoor dining would be almost unthinkably pleasant. The fact is, for an ad hoc system that was initiated to help New York’s restaurants survive, expanded outdoor dining works remarkably well.”
-Alan Systma, Let’s Just Make Expanded Outdoor Dining Permanent for Grub Street

Indoor dining returns at a 25% capacity on September 30, but that alone will not save the restaurant industry. A look at what 25% looks like and interviews with several restauranteurs about what business looks like for them going forward. (Ben Yakas with additional reporting by Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

“The 25% is not going to buy us very much at all.” Paul Giannone, owners of Paulie Gee’s and Paulie G’s Slice Shop. Restaurants react to the return of indoor dining. (Hannah Albertine & Chris Mohney for The Infatuation)

Learn about Elizabeth Jennings: The NYC teacher who desegregated NYC transit. (Jerry Mikorenda for Atlas Obscura)

Apartment Porn: What’s a solarium? This $1.6 million East Village condo has a solarium. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Where to eat outside in Fort Greene. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The state’s Department of Labor has announced that an extra $300 in weekly federal pandemic unemployment benefits will start hitting bank accounts as soon as next week. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Trump administration has secretly siphoned nearly $4 million away from a program that tracks and treats FDNY firefighters and medics suffering from 9/11 related illnesses. (Michael McAuliff for Daily News)

When the headline is enough: Thoughts on the politics and possibilities behind the MTA’s Doomsday budget proposal. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave. Sagas)

Photos: A Red Phalarope found its way to Stuyvesant Cove Park on Saturday morning. It’s a rare sight in the city for birders and for the rest of us, it’s a cool little bird. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

The ten best fried chicken sandwiches in NYC. Yes, the Popeye’s sandwich made the list. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

Note from Rob: Thursday’s article about NYPD Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack was written by Joaquin Sapien, Topher Sanders, and Nate Schweber and co-published with ProPublica and included reporting and analysis from The City.

The Briefly for September 8, 2020 – The “The Suburban Exodus That Never Was” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The Covid-19 school dashboard, how to track your absentee ballot, the best new pizza in Brooklyn, the BQX is dead, and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 82˚
Clear throughout the day.

The Board of Elections in the city launched an Absentee Ballot Tracking system to confirm they received your request, mailed your ballot, accepted your ballot, and how to fix it if they didn’t accept it. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

How helpful is New York’s Covid-19 infection rate? It’s the metric we’re using for keeping public schools open and arguing that we’re ready for indoor restaurants to open. It’s a self-selecting number and experts are pointing out that it’s artificially low in New York. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A Bay Ridge couple was escorted off an NYC Ferry in handcuffs and given a summons for their refusal to wear masks. They also claimed they were being targeted because they were white. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Normally getting hit with a “here come the stink bugs” headline is fine, but in 2020? Give me a break. (Adam Nichols, Reported by Beth Dalby for Patch)

The mass migration to the suburbs isn’t happening. (Jeff Andrews for Curbed)

A quiet Trump administration rule change that could pull FEMA Covid-19 disinfection funding for the city’s subways and schools. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer put forward a proposal to add 75 miles of bike lanes around 50 schools. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The state is launching a dashboard to track Covid-19 cases in public schools. It’ll be available on September 9. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

21 schools in the city will not reopen due to problems with ventilation systems, switching to remote-only instruction. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

798 of the city’s 1,600 public schools have been approved for outdoor learning this fall. Schools can still apply, so expect that number to increase. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Make your way downtown and Vanessa Carlton’s Soho loft can be yours for a cool $15,500 a month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Often you’ll see headlines about high-end restaurants or restaurants with chefs with a pedigree, but let’s celebrate the more normal. A 99 cent Pizza and hot dog joint opened up on Ave A. (EV Grieve)

Video: Héctor Zamora discusses “Lattice Detour,” his exhibition on the roof of The Met. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The city missed its own August 31 deadline for the final report in the investigation into the summer’s protests. The Civilian Complaint Review Board received 750 complaints from 250 incidents. What is the repercussion for missing the deadline? There are no repercussions. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

A look at the Black Surfing Association, who organized their fifth paddle out to protest police violence against Black people. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

J’Ouvert this year was marked with an eerily quiet Brooklyn with a heavy police presence with occasional small gatherings. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s recent uptick in shooting violence was felt at an unofficial J’Ouvert celebration, with five people being shot, including a six-year-old boy. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Photos: It’s a tough bird to find, but a sora was spotted in Bryant Park over the weekend. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

How Astoria’s Niko’s Souvlaki persevered through the pandemic. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Buglisi Dance Theatre and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Table of Silence Project 9/11 performance ritual for peace will be streamed online. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

It looks like the Mets may have a new owner in Steve Cohen for about $2.35 billion. He’ll need to get 23 team owners to approve the purchase of 80% of the team. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The shooting death of Henryk Siwiak, killed on 9/11/2001, is the last unsolved murder of 9/11. (Ephemeral New York)

Governor Cuomo continues to fight against taxing the ultrarich. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Photos and Video: The NYC Deep Playa Night Ride, New York’s one-night answer to Burning Man, but on bikes and without the tech executives. (EV Grieve)

No, it’s not you, there are more mosquitoes this year than in years past. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

“Contingent and student workers have been disproportionately burdened by the NYU administration’s choices, and plans for Fall 2020 reproduce this inequity. High-level administrators and tenured faculty have been allowed to work remotely, while contingent faculty and workers must weigh health concerns against job security. This approach will compound existing inequalities, and will not keep us safe. We must make different choices.”
NYU: Keep Our Campus Safe petition

The Brooklyn Flea is bringing the open-air Chelsea Flea Market back on Saturdays and Sundays. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The mayor won’t make a decision about anything unless he’s forced to, including his own pet project, the BQX. Instead of just saying “this thing ain’t happening,” he’s punted the entire project to the next mayor. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

New York Attorney General Letitia James suspended the collection of medical and student debt that has been specifically referred to her office for collection for an additional 30 days. (Norwood News)

How to break a lease in NYC. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

The de Blasio administration withdrew its support for the YourLIC Coalition, the group of developers who were going to develop a 28-acre area on the Long Island City waterfront, the cursed spot o the Amazon HQ 2 development. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

The story of Jess La Bombera, aka Jessica A. Krug, the white woman from Kansas City pretending to be Afro Latina and from the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The most beautiful post offices in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The best new pizza in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 4, 2020 – The “Batten Down the Hatches!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The reason for the spike in shootings, Open Restaurants will continue next year, how to stay safe on mass transit, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.

President Trump and his company are being investigated for possible bank and insurance fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance. (William K. Rashbaum and Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is once again open to visitors. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

The city is getting ready for a storm surge of 1-2 feet during Tuesday’s expected downpour from Tropical Storm Isaias. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Eataly’s new summer rooftop restaurant, opening on August 7. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

According to an NYC Hospitality Alliance survey, only 17.2% of restaurants and bars say they’re able to pay 50% or more of their rent. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

One-third of the city’s small businesses may close forever, according to a report from the Partnership for New York City with job losses already at 520,000. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New York state is extending its unemployment insurance past the 26-week limit through the end of the year. (East New York News)

All about rent increases. When can it happen, how much can it be, and how to check if your apartment is stabilized. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

The NYPD’s 26th Precinct has a Twitter problem. The precinct is in the heart of Harlem and their Twitter account has a history of hitting the like button on tweets about conspiracy theories, QAnon, and Trump. After being caught, the account removed the likes. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Evergreen headline for the moment: “The NYPD is investigating shootings.” (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

The mayor has his own ideas, as does Commissioner Shea, but the data shows the reason for the city’s spike in shootings is a plummeting number of gun crime arrests. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

NYPD officer Richard Catapano was found dead in his Astoria apartment from an apparent suicide. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Enjoying Open Restaurants? They’ll be back next year, starting on June 1. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

In addition to Open Restaurants returning next year, the city is making curbside dining permanent from June 1 to October 31. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: See the 193 new Rockefeller Center flags designed by the public. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Photos: 22 new libraries opened this week to offer grab-and-go service. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Maintenance workers and security guards at Columbia University will not be going on strike after TWO Local 241 reached an agreement with the university. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

The most expensive area to live in the city during the first half of the year was the 10014 zip code, covering the West Village and Greenwich Village will set you back a median price of $4.2 million. Tribeca’s 10013 was in second place at $3.1 million. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk through Prospect Park from dog beach to Parkside Avenue. (ActionKid)

A Walgreen grows in Brooklyn. (Greenpointers)

A basket intended to prevent debris from falling off of elevated subway tracks onto pedestrians… fell onto a pedestrian on Sunday. An NYC Transit Interim SVP calling it “a very unfortunate incident.” The person hit was taken to the hospital and was reported to be in stable condition. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

If the city’s schools open, what is the city’s plan to get all 150,000 students who rely on buses to school? “The DOE is recommending that families, wherever possible, help reduce the number of students in need of busing by either transporting their children to school on their own, walking, or biking,” aka “you’re on your own.” Got it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Video: Drone footage of all eight Black Lives Matter murals in NYC. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist, video from @mingomatic)

Despite the city’s plans to reopen the schools for the fall, Governor Cuomo has yet to make a decision to allow any school in the state to reopen. He’s expected to announce a decision this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Shootings jumped 177% in July compared to last year, according to the NYPD. Assaults and reported rapes declined year-over-year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Black Lives Matter mural walls in Gowanus were defaced with the tired response of “All Lives Matter.” This is the wall that was accidentally painted over once, so I have confidence that this will be fixed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Photos and Video: The red-tailed hawks of Governors Island. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Tips on how to stay safer on mass transit. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Photos: What the hell is going on with the splashes of blood outside this meat market in Astoria? (Give Me Astoria)

Can you think of a good reason that Williamsburg has more trash cans than Bed Stuy? No, seriously, it’s not a setup to a joke. “Bed Stuy Strong, Safe and Sanitary” wants your input. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Diana Florence, a candidate for Manhattan District Attorney and a former leader of the Construction Fraud Task Force within the DA’s office. She stepped down in January amid allegations that she withheld evidence. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

Facebook signed its 730,000 square foot lease in the Farley Post Office building. When will it move in? That’s a whole other story. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

A judge weighed in on some disputed ballots in NY-12’s Democratic congressional primary allowing some invalidated votes to be counted, but not enough to sway the primary away from incumbent Carolyn Maloney towards challenger Suraj Patel. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

15 summery brunch options for takeout and delivery. (Eater)