The Briefly for July 8, 2020 – The “Manhattan is the Actual Worst (at Socially Distancing)” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city begins counting absentee ballots, a 28 second NYC horror movie, assigning blame for gun violence, a look at PPP loans in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 84˚
Rain in the evening.

A complete NYC horror movie in only 28 seconds. (/u/NewYorkShenanigans)

Dog runs have reopened. (Angi Gonzalez for NY1)

Who’s the worst at socially distancing? We’re looking at you, Manhattan! (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The city’s absentee ballots, by the numbers. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Absentee ballots will begin to be counted in the Bronx, Queens, Manhattan, and Brooklyn today (Staten Island started their count on Monday), and everyone is getting ready to challenge votes like it’s the 2000 election and we’re in Florida. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

There is no official count of New York children who have lost a parent or caregiver to the virus — and even less idea of how the city will help support the likely hundreds or more kids who have suddenly suffered a life-altering loss. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

A look at the data of how the federal government’s Payroll Protection Program’s loans were distributed. The top three zip codes for loan approval were in Greenpoint, Park Slope, and Brooklyn Heights. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The International Culinary Center and the Institute of Culinary Education will be merging. Calling it a “merger” may be generous, the ICE has no plans of expansion and announced nothing when it comes to ICC’s faculty. The ICC is planning on closing its doors but will allow the current students to graduate before doing so. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Other cities may be bouncing back from the massive amount of people filing for unemployment, but in New York City unemployment is near 20%, forcing at least a million people out of work. With jobs tied to the city’s reopening and the city’s reopening tied to the country’s recovery, it doesn’t look like the city will be bouncing back soon. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

These are the measures that NYC courthouses will take to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Get used to seeing thermometers everywhere. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The mayor pledged 100 miles of Open Streets in May, and he is now touting that New York has the most Open Street mileage of any city in the country. That seems to have led the project to prioritize raw mileage over a holistic view of how people and communities want to use their streets or any sense of what conditions it takes for an Open Street site to be successful.
-Sasha Aickin for Streetsblog, ‘Open Streets’ Isn’t Working for All of the People

A Brooklyn man was indicted for allegedly smuggling hundreds of ancient Egyptian artifacts through JFK earlier this year. This is the second-worst Indiana Jones movie ever. (NBC News New York)

Summer school officially kicked off Monday, but some of the 143,000 students enrolled in the remote program have yet to start their coursework due to technical glitches. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer unveiled a plan to reopen the city’s schools, including smaller class sizes, mandatory masks for all teachers and students in second grade or higher, realigned scheduled for remote learning, restricted movement within schools, and more. The plan also calls for at least one full-time nurse at each school in the city. (Robert Pozarycki with Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The “37th Avenue Sidewalk Cafe Coalition” is calling on the city to simplify the permit process for sidewalk seating on a permanent basis. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights)

In an attempt to close the digital divide in low-income communities of color, the city will expand its “Internet Master Plan” over the next 18 months to 600,000 more New Yorkers. The cost is $157 million, with $87 million of it is coming from the NYPD’s budget. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Yankees and Mets will plan two exhibition games against each other on July 18 and 19. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Who wants to spend two billion dollars for a baseball team that loses $50 million a year? No seriously, who wants to buy the Mets? The Steve Cohen watch continues. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Speaking of losing money: Ruminating on if Uber’s purchase of Postmates deal is good for restaurants. One business that only loses money buying another that only loses money. What could go wrong? (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

How Black organizers fed the Occupy City Hall protests with restaurant and homemade meals. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The MTA is adding 9,000 more digital screens to subway stations to better inform people. Sorry, typo. I meant to sell more advertising. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The fledgling hawks in Tompkins Square Park are beginning to explore outside the park, but the family is doing extremely well. (Laura Goggin Photography)

When Lambda Lounge in Harlem opens this weekend, it will become only the second Black-owned LGBTQ+ bar in New York City. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

22 places Lin-Manuel Miranda left his mark in NYC. (Hannah Nice for StreetEasy)

Privately run child care centers in New York City can reopen as early as Monday, about three months after the coronavirus forced 3,000 programs to shut their doors. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

City Councilmember Rory Lancman, representing central Queens, is calling on Mayor de Blasio to fire NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea for blaming the recent surge in violent crime on criminal justice and police brutality reforms. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The mayor thinks that a majority of New Yorkers think more policing will mean that they’re safe. A recent Sienna poll points out that only 33% of New Yorkers said they feel “more secure” when they see a police officer. Who does the mayor think he represents? (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

“We have the knowledge to stop shootings; it’s unfortunate that most of our powers were taken away to stop the shootings. Knowledge is power? Well, we have the knowledge, we don’t have the power.” -Chief of Crime Control Strategies Michael LiPetri, committing a crime by murdering an idiom while looking to place blame anywhere but the NYPD for an uptick in shootings. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“Crime has been going up since 2018. This was before there were any reforms around bail or there was a release from Rikers Island.” Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance has his own theories. (NY1)

“We’ve had violence that we haven’t seen in many years and the police strategy is to reduce crime. In the past few days, we’ve been trying to reimagine policing, by listening to the community, set up meetings with community leaders and find out what they value, their cultures, and give the community the police service they desire.” Chief of Community Affairs Jeffrey Maddrey isn’t here to win, he’s here to make friends. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Touchy Blinky, a mobile interactive art/music/tech installation that is helping keep the East Village and the city weird. (Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

Where to eat when it might randomly rain for twenty minutes. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 29, 2020 – The “Our ‘Let Someone Else Figure It Out’ Mayor” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of movie theaters, George Floyd demonstrations, the city’s contact tracing program is a mess, the Tompkins Square hawks grow up, and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 75˚
Possible drizzle overnight.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 79˚

The City Council is pushing a sidewalk-table bill forward that would allow restaurants to apply for permits that would expire on October 31 for outdoor dining. This isn’t a revolutionary idea, even Cincinnatti got it done already. Mayor de Blasio’s complete lack of leadership constantly leaves voids for others to fill. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

When the city starts phase one of reopening, employees of construction jobs, wholesale, manufacturing, agriculture, and retail companies (with safety procedures in place) can go back to work. This will mean somewhere between 200,000 and 400,000 New Yorkers will return to work. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Once New yorkers start to get back to work, how are they getting there? Are the city and state committed to making sure that our public transportation can get those workers to work safely? Our mayor, not known for being proactive, is leaving that decision up to workers and is expecting that the “short-term reality” is that there will be a spike in drivers. No talk about making sure the subways and buses are safe and will be ready no conversation about more opportunities for bicycles, just more cars. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

All the borough presidents have sent a letter to the mayor demanding the city set aside 40 miles of “emergency” bus lanes to get ahead of the expected car congestion. My favorite bit of reporting from this article is “In a press conference on Thursday, the mayor did not allude specifically to the letters, but told reporters that he’s thinking about what to do, but hasn’t done anything yet.” Beautiful. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

So you’ve made sourdough bread, countless cocktails, Shake Shack sauces, Junior’s cheesecakes, and pizza at home during the pandemic. What’s next? Boba Guys have a DIY bubble tea kit. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The same groups that sued the city over its stop-and-frisk policy have sued the city over the NYPD’s Covid-19 social distancing enforcement, calling it “stop and frisk 2.0.” Their original case against the city led to a ruling that declared stop and frisk unconstitutional and racially discriminatory. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

Union Square was full of protestors on Thursday night as a part of nationwide demonstrations sparked by the killing of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police. The demonstrators were met with an aggressive police presence, including an eye witness seeing an officer put a knee on someone’s neck as a part of their arrest. Another rally is planned for 4 pm in Foley Square and at night outside the Barclays Center. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: 10 weeks of a quiet Tribeca. (Tribeca Citizen)

Video: Over 100 years of bread-baking experience at Madonia Bakery in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Williamsburg has a new mural, courtesy of street artist Swoon, on S. Fifth Street. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

When we think back to what was different about the summer of 2020, the return of drive-in movies to the city should be close to the top of the list. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five tech-forward strategies restaurants are testing to ease back into dining in NYC. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Times’ review of the animated “Central Park” on Apple TV+ from the makers of Bob’s Burgers: “Delightful, not depressing.” (James Poniewozik for NY Times)

Video: The stunning sights of empty NYC landmarks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

One of the reasons that I love New York City is that a headline that reads “Gay, democratic-socialist candidate leads Clinton Hill state senate race in fundraising” is not remotely out of the ordinary. One reason Jabari Brisport is out ahead for his senate race is the support of Bernie Sanders’ Our Revolution. (Matt Tracy for Brooklyn Paper)

A feature on artist Sara Erenthal, whose work you’ve likely strewn about the city, and her latest series of work dedicated to the city under lockdown. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

How many of the city’s 1.1 million students are taking classes online? Don’t ask the Department of Education. No, seriously, don’t ask because they don’t know. (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Movie theaters are a part of phase four of New York’s reopening plan, which could be July or later. What will movie theaters look like when they reopen? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

No mask, no service. The governor signed an executive order allowing businesses to refuse service to people for not wearing masks. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Maybe it was partially inspired by this video of Staten Islanders screaming at an unmasked woman to get the hell out of a grocery store until she left. (TMZ)

How do you wear a mask to a bar or restaurant? Good question. Grub Street dives in. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Bobby Catone, known jackass and owner of a tanning salon on Staten Island, opened his tanning salon for a moment on Thursday morning when he was warned by police he could be thrown in jail and have his license revoked if he disobeys and opens his salon again. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Hillary Swank’s former townhouse in the West Village sold for $9.8 million. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

More than 190,000 New Yorkers applied for unemployment last week as national joblessness rates reached 41 million. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city supposedly hired over 1,700 contract tracers, but the reality of the situation is uncertain and the blame is being put on Mayor de Blasio for making NYC Health & Hospitals in charge of the effort instead of the Department of Health. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Museum will become a temporary food pantry starting in June. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

It’s art you’ll need a drone to appreciate. Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada is painting a 20,000 square-foot mural in Flushing Meadows/Corona Park. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Photos: The Tompkins Square hawks are growing up right before our eyes. (Lauge Goggin Photography)

The mayor is flirting with a financial tactic with the intention of digging the city out of its current financial hole that brought the city to the brink of bankruptcy in the 1970s. The idea is to borrow up to $7 billion from the state, which would put the city on the hook for $500 million payments for the next twenty years. The idea was called “fiscally questionable” by the governor. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní, Jeffery C. Mays and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 24, 2020 – The Weekend “Train Daddy Andy Byford Quit His Job” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A bed bug shuts down a subway station, e-bike legalization is on the horizon, cashless stores are a thing of the past, the best hot chocolate and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 49˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 36˚ High: 51˚

A headline that cuts right to the bone: Millennials Love Zillow Because They’ll Never Own a Home. (Angela Lashbrook for OneZero)

How many bed bugs does it take to shut down and evacuate a subway station? One. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Stonewall Democratic Club of New York City endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

A list of the “absolute best” hot chocolate in the city, with L.A. Burdick at the top of the list. (Leah Koenig for Grub Street)

Say farewell, Train Daddy has left the city. Andy Byford has quit as the president of New York City Transit. (Christina Goldbaum and Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

In two years on the job, Andy Byford actually seemed to be doing good work. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Why Andy, why? The likely reason we’re being left behind is the impending MTA restructuring. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

I don’t think there’s any truth that Byford couldn’t get along with me” -Governor Cuomo, who almost 100% had trouble getting along with Andy Byford. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Will the MTA’s progress be delayed because of Byford’s departure? According to City Councilmember Joe Borelli, “Unfortunately, we lost the good guy and we’re stuck with Andrew.” (Gloria Pazmino for NY 1)

Limited edition ‘Star Trek: Picard’ MetroCards are available at the 14th St and 7th Ave on the 1/2/3, 28th St and 7th Ave on the 1, 57th St and 6th Ave on the F, 42nd St at Union Square on the 4/5/6/L/N/Q/R/W, and 28th and Broadway on the R/W. The MetroCards will be available for the next three weeks. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A preview of the new Hayden Planetarium space show Worlds Beyond Earth, narrated by Lupita Nyong’o. (Jennifer Vanasco for Gothamist)

What’s going to replace Fat Baby on Rivington? Who knows, because the replacement has already been evicted. If you’ve got $23,000 a month, it could be yours. (Bowery Boogie)

Governor Cuomo will push the state’s legislature to pass his electric bike and scooter legalization bill next week, with April 1 being the worst case scenario. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The comments about pushing the legalization came when talking criticizing the de Blasio administration’s “arbitrary” enforcement of the ban with “no uniformity.” Where he sees no leadership from Mayor de Blasio, he intends to create it himself. (Gresh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Cashless stores are a thing of the past. The City Council passed a ban on cashless stores on Thursday, citing that a cash-free business is discriminating against consumers who aren’t in a position to have a back banking you. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Anyone Comics in Crown Heights is hosting a 24-hour comic book creation marathon on February 1.

According to a new study, the two most livable neighborhoods in the city are Battery Park and Brooklyn Heights. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Five sights that show how much lower Manhattan has changed. (Jane Margolies for NY Times)

Fairway filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and will sell off five stores to complete a sale to the company that operates ShopRite and Gourmet Garage. The stores it will sell off are the Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Chelsea, Harlem and Kips Bay. (Chris Crowley is Grub Street)

Mean Girls: The Musical is becoming a movie. Mean Girls: The Movie: The Musical: The Movie: The Book, coming to theaters soon? (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo’s $2 billion AirTrain to LaGuardia has ulterior motives: more overall parking. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

The Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama are coming to the Brooklyn Museum on August 27 and will be there through October 24. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Six of the oldest cars on the Upper West Side. (David Cunningham for I Love the Upper West Side)

Seven years ago, Brooklyn borough president Marty Markowitz announced Brooklyn would gets its own friendship arch as a gift from the Chinese government to be placed to welcome people to Brooklyn’s Chinatown. After years of planning and announcements, the project appears to be dead. (Yoav Gonan for The City)

Op/Ed: The argument against rezoning Soho/Noho to allow more affordable housing to be built is an argument that recognizes when the city talks about rezoning for affordable housing, they also rezone for super-luxury apartment buildings. (Andrew Berman for GVSHP)

This Sunday is Australia Day, here are 11 ways to celebrate. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Chopt is buying Dos Toros. The new owners are keeping the restaurant chains separate, but they will share a loyalty program. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Congrats to ActionKid on his silver YouTube play button, celebrating 100,000 subscribers. He celebrated by taking a sunrise walk with his new plaque into Manhattan. (ActionKid)

Luxury condo prices are at their lowest levels since 2013, hitting $3,816,835, and the surplus of unsold luxury apartments is still high. Over 25% of Manhattan’s luxury apartments are sitting empty. (Valeri Ricciulli for Curbed)

Photos: For the last few days, a Bald Eagle has been seen in Riverside Park. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

How John Mulaney spends his Sundays. (Paige Darrah for NY Times)

21 restaurants ideal for solo diners. (Diana Hubbell for Eater)