The Briefly for November 15-16, 2020 – The “President of NYC Buses?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The city’s new Covid-19 restrictions, the Brooklyn Cyclones are expanding, Pearl River Mark expands, a new RBG mural, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 60˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

The CDC updated its mask guidance to explicitly say that masks help prevent the spread of disease by protecting people in the mask wearer’s vicinity, but wearing a mask will also help prevent you from contracting Covid-19. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The state is implementing new rules on the city in light of the rise in Covid-19 cases. Indoor and outdoor dining, along with gyms, will close at 10 pm and Indoor and outdoor gatherings in private will be limited to 10 people. These are the three vectors for spread, according to the state’s contact tracers. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The protected Crescent St bike lane in Astoria was finished last month to complaints from cyclists that it didn’t provide adequate protection. This week, a scooter rider was killed by a delivery truck driver, making it the 205th person to be killed on city streets this year, up from 185 last year. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Speaking of protected bike lanes, there has been a car parking in the 4th Ave protected bike lane in Brooklyn for at least four months. The protected bike lane is literally painted around this car. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Interview: MTA Bus President Craig Cipriano on a fully electric fleet, what the MTA would do with funding from a Biden administration, and wait, there’s a bus president? (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Where to pre-order Thanksgiving pies in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Congressional race for the 11th congressional district is over with Max Rose conceding to Nicole Malliotakis, who will go on to represent a portion of Brooklyn and all of Staten Island in the House of Representatives. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

While the Staten Island Yankees are dead, the Brooklyn Cyclones have received an upgrade from the Mets. The team will become a full-season High-A team, meaning more games in Coney Island from April through September. (Jim Dolan for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The city is set to launch a pilot program next year that will see healthcare professionals responding to people suffering a mental health crisis instead of the NYPD. The pilot will start in two yet to be named communities. (Joe Jurado for The Root)

Starting December 3 through March 4, you can catch a monthly light show projected onto the side of the Manhattan Bridge. The installations are part of the LIGHT YEAR project and will be viewable online because who the hell knows when this pandemic will ever end. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The lawsuit seeking to expand indoor dining from 25% capacity to 50% capacity was thrown out. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Photo: A new mural of Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the corner of 1st and 11th. This replaces the Shepard Fairey “Rise Above” mural. (@ellestreetart)

The top 100 albums of the year, from Williamsburg’s Rough Trade. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Farewell to The Creek & The Cave, the comedy club in Long Island City open for 14 years, forced closed bt the pandemic. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

On Tuesday I was worried about a cold being something worse and found out what all people looking to get tested have discovered, with the rise in cases in NYC, long lines for testing have returned. I tested negative. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This is the same Staten Island that is now NYC’s epicenter for Covid-19. Or as the Times puts it “Staten Island has bristled at coronavirus restrictions, but now has the highest positive test rate in the city,” which is the most inappropriate use of the word “but” in the history of the Times. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

This week Dr. Anthony Fauci was honored by Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams for being a Covid-19 Hero. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Inside the city’s billion-dollar PPE bungle. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Attention Upper West Siders with dogs: don’t use the Museum of Natural History’s fenced off as a dog toilet. The museum is adjacent to a dog run and across the street from Central Park. (I Love the Upper West Side)

No matter what side you land on in the Industry City rezoning, the debate over the plan’s merits made clear that our Sunset Park community is in dire need of new housing — especially affordable units.
-Nelson Santana, Without Industry City rezoning, Sunset Parks needs affordable housing to stop displacement, for Brooklyn Paper

Marseille and Nizza in Hell’s Kitchen are giving actors a break and allowing them to eat now and pay whenever they’re able to again. (NY1)

Pearl River Mart is expanding beyond its original concept as a department store. The Pearl River Mart Foods is now open at the Chelsea Market, a market devoted to Ascian foods. (Roger Clark for NY1)

A look at the city’s manufacturing industry and what businesses are doing to stay relevant and in NYC. (Greg David for The City)

It is sad to see how deep this cowardice goes.” -AOC on Republicans refusing to acknowledge Biden’s victory. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

RIP Pearl Chin, founder of the Upper West Side’s Knitty City. (Alex Vadukul for NY Times)

Two years after the Civilian Complaint Review Board announced that it would begin to investigate police sexual misconduct, the CCRB is starting the process again and seeking public comment on new rules that allow it to probe sexual misconduct claims against the NYPD. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

The unmasking of “Clouseau” set us back, not only in the relationship between the NYPD and the community but within the department itself. The NYPD is one of the most diverse police departments in the country, with over 50 percent of its members being non-white. It should come as no surprise that members of the NYPD experience racism and sexism, just like the citizens they protect.
-Berby St. Fort and Eric Adams, a ranking member of the NYPD and the Brooklyn borough president, Time for NYPD to have a reckoning over equality within the ranks, for Brooklyn Paper

The restaurant rent crisis is continuing, with 88% of restaurants and bars unable to make rent in October. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Brian Maiorana was ordered heled without bail for threatening violence against people celebrating the election results and also violating restrictions imposed against him as a registered sex offender. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Where to eat in Williamsburg right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for May 21, 2020 – The “Is This Guy A Complete Idiot?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city struggles to keep yeshivas closed, 19 organizations helping essential workers, 10 lesser-known picnic spots, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.

More and more, people are waking up to the realization that whatever the city looks like after this is all over, it doesn’t have to be what it was before this started. Manhattan President Gale Brewer wants an expanded Street Seats program and less parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

“Do you have reservations? No? Please leave.” Is reservations only the future of restaurants? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Is Dr. Mitchell Katz, the head of the city’s public hospital system and also the city’s tracing system for Covid-19, a delusional idiot? He made mention that everyone should do what he did to help his ailing parents and just find an apartment in your building to put her in instead of a nursing home. Everyone has the ability to do that, right? Just pay for another apartment and also maybe hire a caretaker. What do you mean he’s making $700,000 and you’re not? Just get a $700,000 a year job and then you’re all set. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It looks like Michael Cohen may serve the rest of his prison sentence at home thanks to an early release over Covid-19 concerns. (Benjamin Weiser, Katie Benner and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is planning a mid-August reopening “or perhaps a few weeks later,” which is a lot of wiggle room. Whenever they reopen, the rest of the year will have additional social distancing requirements with the hope that things can be relaxed sometime in 2021, when the Met Gala might also return. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The city’s politicians and advocacy groups are beginning to share one message to the mayor, and that is when we open up, we have to stop using streets for cars and let businesses and people take over the streets. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

19 organizations helping essential workers in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The NYPD dispursed three yeshivas that had illegally opened up for classes and gatherings on Wednesday and were issued “polite warnings.” The mayor was pushed about this on Inside City Hall with Errol Louis, who asked him if he had “some kind of political understanding with the leaders of the Orthodox community that there would basically be no enforcement around this?” The mayor insisted they are receiving no special treatment, despite multiple pieces of evidence that gatherings are happening regularly. Let’s not forget that the mayor’s wife has aspirations of running for Brooklyn borough president. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Child vaccination rates plummeted 63% as Covid-19 spread across New York City. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City landmarks will be lit up green tonight in honor of the parks workers. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The 10 best lesser-known spots for a lovely NYC picnic. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Monty for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 14, 2020 – The “Your Reservation for The L Train is in 45 Minutes” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 12 miles of new open streets, the NYPD take aim at Dr Oxiris Barbot, the possible end of the Staten Island Yankees, a brunch delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 58˚ High: 62˚
Possible light rain overnight.

I haven’t been tested this whole time.” -Mayor de Blasio (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city is adding 12 additional miles of open streets today/Thursday. Some protected bike lanes that have been long-planned were also announced for opening throughout the month. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The MTA is looking into “everything” when it comes to crowd control and reducing packed subway cars once the city starts reopening, including reserving space on subways and buses. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The chaos at Elmhurst hospital exposes the city’s lack of a cohesive healthcare system and shows that all we have are a series of hospitals that are ill-equipped to work as a team. (Jim Dwyer for NY Times)

The police union is calling for the head of Dr. Oxiris Barbot after she denied an NYPD request for 500,000 surgical masks during the height of the pandemic. Her response was that she “didn’t give two rats’ asses about your cops.” Okay, maybe that’s not the best response, but the NYPD’s total headcount is 55,000, why do they need 500,000 masks during a PPE shortage? (NY1)

It must be fun to be NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea because he seems to exist in a reality that the rest of us don’t inhabit. According to Shea, the problem with the NYPD’s selective and racially biased enforcement isn’t the NYPD, the problem is the people the NYPD are enforcing the rules on. No one doubts that being an NYPD officer is one of the toughest possible jobs in the city, but to argue that when a cop with a violent history beats the shit out of an NYCHA groundskeeper with no criminal history, it’s the groundskeeper’s fault? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It was only a few months ago that I linked to a story about Brian Quinn, aka Q from “Impractical Jokers” on TruTV reviving the Rubsam and Horrmann name for brewing company in Staten Island. Covid-19, like with most things, pumped the brakes on his places. Now their unused beer is being used to create hand santizer, working with Kings County Distillery in Brooklyn. (Roger Clark for NY1)

State Senator Julia Salazar earned Bernie Sanders’s endorsement in her re-election campaign, along with financial support from his followers. State Senator Mike Gianaris also earned Sanders’s support for his beating back of Amazon in Queens. (Andrew Karpan for Bushwick Daily)

82 kids are being treated for pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome. Fourteen states and five European countries are investigating the syndrome. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The move by Major League Baseball to downsize minor league teams is still moving forward, and the Staten Island Yankees are still on the chopping block. Game attendance was at its lowest last season and its games are the third-lowest attended games in the league. This could be the last season for the team if the season ever gets started. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

There’s a commissioned new mural at Atlantic Terminal by Brooklyn artist Jason Naylor which adds a splash of bright color, titled “Hope,” to the city. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo added a sign language interpreter to his daily press conferences after being sued by Disability Rights New York for not including one. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Crews at Green-Wood Cemetery have been working seven days a week with shifts that can be longer than 17 hours to keep up with the demand for cremation and burials. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

In a sign of good news, healthcare workers now have a lower rate of infection than the general population, which points at being careful and taking precautions actually working. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Are we ready for in-person shopping to look very different? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

David Chang is closing Momofuku Nishi for good. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The City Council passed a package of legislation to help small businesses on Wednesday that aims to protect commercial tenants from harassment by their landlords and restrict the fees that third-party apps such as Grubhub and Uber Eats can charge businesses during states of emergency. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

The New York Times has discovered something new during the pandemic: the outside. (Alexis Soloski for NY Times)

The city is supposed to be stepping up to help New York’s homeless when the subways close at 1 am. NY1 followed the trains to the end of the tracks to find a city that was not equipped to help the people that need it the most. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

Plan your weekend, here’s a brunch delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Karen for today’s featured photo of a new way to get car-free streets in the city.