The Briefly for July 19, 2019 – The “It’s Called the Urban Heat Island Effect” Edition

The mayor wasted $220 million, ConEd keeps blacking out, an AriZona Iced Tea pop-up shop ends arrests, the best brunch spots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Portions of the R, L, 1, 5, and N trains are out this weekend, the 3 is out completely and more “fun” in this weekend’s planned subway disruptions and diversions. (Subway Weekender)

The story of Preserved Fish, the man. (Untapped Cities)

If it seems like the city heats up like an oven, you’d be right. The concrete absorbs heat, the glass reflects it, and the lack of open space prevents the heat from dissipating. It’s called the “Urban Heat Island Effect.” (Gothamist)

Quickly, what borough has the highest number of home listings with pools? Turns out it’s the Bronx. (Localize Labs)

This is the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard of, and I wanna be the best at it,” a firsthand account of the ecstasy and the agony of the Brooklyn Air Guitar Championships. (Hard Noise)

In 2015, the mayor spent $220 million to ensure that 5,000 apartments in Stuy Town would remain rent-regulated until at least 2035. When the state passed rent reforms, it made that $220 million irrelevant. (Gothamist)

If you’re on the 1, 2, or 3 lines, you’re gonna get hit with some major subway disruptions for the next month and a half of weekends. (6sqft)

“You’re the mayor. Use your authority. Because nothing has changed.” Protests outside city hall and police headquarters called for justice five years after the death of Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

State Assemblymember Helen Rosenthal wants to end New York state school incubator projects for good. It’s not uncommon for ducks to be dumped in city parks where they are defenseless and wildlife rehabilitators spend time to find, feed, and care for the domesticated ducks that can’t survive on their own. (I Love the Upper West Side)

ConEd’s failures continue as blackouts continue to be a problem in portions of the city. Manhole fires caused outages in Maspeth, Elmhurst, Sunset Park, Borough Park, Flushing, parts of the Bronx, and the Upper West Side (again). ConEd blames the manhole fires on the heat, they also blame manhole fires on the cold when it’s cold. (Gothamist)

American Idol is coming to Greenpoint for auditions on July 23, so get ready to watch a bunch of New Yorkers embarrass themselves on television soon. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: Think about the nightmare of standing on a subway platform looking at the tracks when suddenly a construction wall gives out behind you, sending a flood of water towards you, knocking you off your feet headed towards the tracks. That was the reality at the Court Square-23rd Street subway station on Wednesday night. (Gothamist)

8 things you may not know about the American Museum of Natural History. (6sqft)

AriZona Iced Tea tried to sell 99 cent Adidas shoes at a pop-up shop on the Bowery on Thursday morning. It ended with two assaults, arrests, and the NYPD shutting the whole event down. (Eater)

10 must-see art shows to help beat the heat. (NY Times)

A brief guide to bike etiquette. (Gothamist)

What’s going on in Sunset Park? A second body was found in the waters off Sunset Park in two days. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Lower East Siders don’t argue that their neighborhood needs protection from flooding, but the loudest among them don’t appear to want that protection if it means having to live without the East River Park for three and a half years. (Gothamist)

El Chapo has been taken to an “undisclosed location,” which means he’s finally out of New York City’s hair/a>. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s calls for “due process” when comes to the Eric Garner case are a part of a pattern the mayor executes to avoid taking a stand on controversial issues that arises as a result of potential police misconduct. (The Indypendent)

Everyone be on the lookout for this jerk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What is it about the Brooklyn Youth Chorus that has attracted artists like Beyoncé Elton John, Alicia Keys, Grizzly Bear, and more to collaborate with them? (NY Times)

There are only 24 recognized professional air hockey players in the world. The New York Air Hockey Club is always looking for the next great players. (NY Times)

New York doesn’t discriminate when it comes to what stores get tagged by graffiti artists. Welcome to Ludlow Street, Louis Vuitton. (Bowery Boogie)

The New York City Triathalon has been canceled as a result of the heatwave, scheduled to take place on the city’s first 100-degree day in seven years. (Patch)

“Beautiful,” the Carole King Broadway musical is closing at the end of October after six years and grossing a quarter billion dollars. (NY Times)

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is back in the city filming season 3. (West Side Rag)

Enter Sandman. This Sunday New York Yankee’s closer Mariano Rivera will be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. (amNY)

A new state law prohibits race discrimination based on hair or hairstyles. (The Root)

9 places to enjoy a delicious brunch in the city. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 22, 2019 – The “A Carmel Frappuccino with Two Pumps of Pesticide Please” Edition

New York state closes in on the president, Fleet Week starts, a beloved ice cream shop is getting pushed out, where to eat outside, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Every subway stop’s median rent mapped. (/r/NYC)

Beyond The Streets” is bringing the work of 150 street artists to Williamsburg this summer. (Time Out)

Turns out Starbucks might have been using an industrial pesticide in an attempt to hide its unsanitary convictions. Which Starbucks? According to a new class-action lawsuit, it’s all of them in the city. (Gothamist)

The sky is falling, but this time it’s not the ceiling on the subways. A tourist is in critical, but stable, condition after a branch from a sickly tree in Washington Square Park fell on her. (Gothamist)

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. A minority-owned, beloved and long-standing shop in a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood is being forced to close. Scoops in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens is in the process of being evicted by its landlord after being in the neighborhood since 1984. (Bklyner)

Where to eat near the Javits Center (if you must). (Eater)

Naked Shakespeare in Prospect Park, just like the Bard intended it to be performed. (Time Out)

You’d think that after paying $53,000 a year to attend NYU you’d be able to easily get tickets to graduation. You’d be wrong. Tickets are going on the secondary market for hundreds of dollars. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is giving you an opportunity to listen to plants without having to drop acid. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The absolute worst time to leave for Memorial Day weekend will be between 4:45 and 6:45pm on Thursday, but delays will start today. (Curbed)

Your 2019 guide to city beaches. (Gothamist)

The goats who will landscape Riverside Park started their summer jobs and the photos are delightful. (Untapped Cities)

Today starts Fleet Week. Here’s what you need to know. (Patch)

The Port Authority wants your input to improve the Bus Terminal. No, you can’t say “burn it down.” (Curbed)

Ska is dead. The proof. “I love ska.” -Mayor de Blasio. (BrooklynVegan)

You have a few days to say farewell to the city’s only California Pizza Kitchen before it closes on Friday. (Eater)

There are more people in Manhattan than North and South Dakota, combined! (Viewing NYC)

David Byrne is trying to rally the mayor to restore a $59 million funding cut for cultural programs in this year’s budget. (Patch)

A great white shark continues to prowl near the city’s waters, but you can safely swim in the Long Island Sound. (NY Times)

The Daniel Pantaleo trial over the death of Eric Garner continues with multiple delays. After three hours this week, the case is taking a two-week hiatus. (Gothamist)

New York state is closing in on President Trump. A new bill will allow state prosecutors to pursue anyone granted a presidential pardon and the next up is a bill that will allow the state to release the president’s state tax returns to Congress. (NY Times)

As sea levels continue to rise, the city’s largest threat is literally all around us. (New York City News Service)

Don’t pull the emergency brakes on the subway if you’re not at a station. (NY Times)

City Council Member Helen Rosenthal is planning to introduce legislation that would create an Office on Sexual Harassment Prevention inside the mayor’s office. There was a 1993 executive order from Mayor Dinkins, but it was never put into effect. (Gotham Gazette)

77 places to eat outside. (The Infatuation)

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