The Briefly for December 12, 2019 – The “New Subway Signals Have Been Foiled by Snow” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: LIC gets a Trader Joe’s, a plan to punish bad drivers in the NYPD, the Javits center construction is set to be mostly complete by the spring, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 35˚
Clear throughout the day.

With four Republican state senators not seeking re-election in 2020, the path is open for the state’s Democrats to form a supermajority. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Is there room in NYC for this Frankenstein’s monster of wafer-thin pizza? We accepted Detroit-style, we’d even begrudgingly allow Chicago-style to come in to the city, we we’re hot about Rhode Island-style, but this? Has pizza science finally gone too far? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There are calls for Mayor de Blasio to cancel SantaCon. While SantaCon being an event sponsored by the mayor’s office, there is a petition you can sign. (EV Grieve)

Columbia University made a promise 14 years ago to create a new public school in exchange for a 49-year rent-free lease on a piece of land. Imagine the surprise when Columbia presented a plan to build a 400-foot-tall residential tower on that land. Columbia has been slowly expanding its footprint and the neighborhood is justifiably worried. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

People move to NYC every day, so every day it’s useful to have a link that answers the question “what’s a bodega?” (Lauren Paley for StreetEasy)

The 7 train’s new signal communication was foiled on Wednesday by… some snow and slush. Yup. The MTA spent $800 million on new signals and there’s a “known phenomenon” that’s been known about since March. When a transponder malfunctions due to snow or slush, the train essentially becomes “lost” to the MTA’s computers and its speed is reduced from 50 mph to 25 mph. Very reassuring. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

New York City, get ready to be REMEd. Of course REME is the new Racially and Ethnically Motivated Extremism unit of the NYPD targeting far-right and extremist hate groups like The Proud Boys or Atomwaffen Division. This comes in response to the shootings in New Jersey. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Turns out, those no-doors, dangle-your-feet-over-NYC-for-maximally-impressive-content- helicopter experiences may be pretty unsafe — by design. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Anti-violence programs across Coney Island are getting $850,000 in city funding to address an uptick in gun violence in the community, starting with gaps in social services. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A remote starting feature on a Lexus caused the death of 21-year-old Michael Kosanovich last week on 148th St in South Jamaica. Kosanovich was crushed between the Lexus and another car when the Lexus rolled forward after being started. Pedestrians were able to push the car off of him, but the car slipped and pinned him between the cars for a second time. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Former President Clinton visited Bed-Stuy’s Cornerstone Baptist Church to check out the energy-efficient upgrades the church was able to install thanks to a commitment from the Clinton Global Initiative University. (Raymond Hagans for The Brooklyn Reader)

The latest episode of the What’s The [DATA] Point? podcast takes a look at the $28.8 billion cumulative four-year budget gap for New York between 2020 and 2023. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

From the team behind the excellent pizza and wine restaurant Ops comes Leo, a new pizza place in Williamsburg split between a cafe/slice shop and a restaurant. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Harvey Weinstein and more than 30 actresses and former employees accusing him of sexual harassment and rape reached a tentative $25 million settlement that would not require Weinstein to pay a single dime out of his own pocket. The money would come from the $47 million settlement closing down the Weinstein Company. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best and worst architecture of 2019. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

A two-year-old boy was caught between a moving 2 train and the platform at Fulton Street during rush hour on Wednesday. He died at the hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The Dry aged Red Hook Tavern burger at Red Hook Tavern, the gruyère fritters at Crown Shy, the Sicilian slice and regular slice at F & F Pizzeria, and the rest of Pete Wells’s top 10 dishes of 2019. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Long Island City is getting a Trader Joe’s. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

The Department of Transportation has a plan to address the insanity on the roads surrounding Essex Place, but it’s gonna take some time. Not months, but years, and by then congestion pricing will be in place. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A combination of miscommunication and faulty construction lead to the slow response to 80 homes’ basements being flooded with raw sewage on Thanksgiving weekend. (Max Parrott for amNewYork)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (Martha Schwindener for NY Times)

The construction at the Javits center is on-time, on-budget, and expected to be “substantially complete” by the spring. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The cleanup of the Newtown Creek has hit some murky waters. The EPA decided on a plan that reduces the combined sewer overflow pollution by 61% rather than an option that would eliminate it completely. Combined sewer overflow basically boils down to the neighborhoods toilets flushing directly into the creek when the sewer system is overloaded. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Interested in the city’s combined sewer overflows? You might enjoy the @combinedsewer Twitter account. It tweets when the city’s sewer system can’t handle a combination of sewage and rain and the overflow is released into the city’s waterways. (@combinedsewer)

The de Blasio administration is getting moving on actually punishing NYPD officers with parking placard for being unable to follow the law while behind the wheel of their own cars. Starting next year, NYPD officers and employees will lose their city-issued parking placard if they get too many moving violation tickets. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Whoops! A mixup meant that a dozen city classrooms didn’t receive the emergency lead-removal that were supposed to before the school year started. (Christoper Werth for Gothamist)

A calculator to help you decide if you should be renting or buying in NYC. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

The best sports bars in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 29, 2019 – The “Seven Years Since Hurricane Sandy” Edition

Italian AOC, Corey Johnson’s Master Plan is expected to pass City Council, the best ramen, dogs in Halloween costumes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Popeyes chicken sandwich returns on Sunday. An excellent pairing with early voting. (Gothamist)

Reminder: Early voting continues all week. (QNS.com)

You can go to the Village to watch the Halloween parade if you’re a masochist, but NY1 will broadcast the parade and there’s a live webcam you can fire up if you can’t “borrow” someone’s Spectrum password. Enjoy costume spotting without braving the rain, people, or the subway ride home. (Curbed)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson’s “Streets Master Plan” is expected to pass City Council this week, which would add 250 miles of protected bike lanes and 150 dedicated bus lanes to the city. (6sqft)

The mayor supports the plan, but only as long as he doesn’t have to preside over it. The first year of the plan would be 2021, the first year the city would be free from de Blasio’s mayorship. (Gothamist)

Data continues to show traffic on 13th St has not gotten any worse than it was before the 14th St busway. (Streetsblog)

Here’s how NYC is preparing for the next Hurricane Sandy. (Curbed)

Industry City’s 6.6-million-square-foot expansion plan and renderings have been revealed. (New York YIMBY)

Photos: Check out all the good pups in the Fort Greene dog costume contest. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Domestic violence is the leading causing of homelessness in the city. 41% of people entering shelters from July 2017 through July 2018 did so following a domestic violence incident. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

One in ten of the city’s 1.1 million students is homeless, according to the New York State Technical and Education Assistance Center for Homeless Students. (Patch)

Photos: “What’s the big deal about Wegmans?  Am I missing something?” was a text I got from a friend on Monday morning. I honestly couldn’t tell you but it’s hard to argue with the droves of people who showed up in the rain. (Gothamist)

The mayor made a big deal about having “the talk” with his son when it comes to dealing with the police during his failed presidential campaign, but what he didn’t talk about was the more than half a dozen times he had the NYPD drive his son to and from Yale or pick him up at Penn Station when he decided to take the train. The mayor denies this. (Patch)

Photos: The 16th annual Bike Kill, a gathering of “mutant bicycles,” originated by the Black Label Bicycle Club. (Gothamist)

8 of New York City’s spookiest abandoned sites. (6sqft)

There is mounting support for a ban of non-essential helicopter flights around the city, ending the steady stream of sightseeing rides around lower Manhattan and Uber’s new “taxi” service to JFK. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: More from Great PUPkin Halloween Parade in Fort Greene Park. (Gothamist)

Winter is usually the quiet time of year to rent in the city, but there are indications that this year will be tougher than usual. (StreetEasy)

A plan to regulate hotels south of Union Square is being met with mixed reactions. According to City Councilmember Carlina Rivera, the plan would protect neighborhoods against outsized commercial developments like the Moxy Hotel on East 11th St, but it’s met with skepticism that it would instead encourage the development of office buildings. (Curbed)

Why hip hop began in the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Add a tugboat to the things that need to be removed from the Gowanus Canal. The boat started taking on water during Sunday’s rain, eventually becoming almost entirely submerged. (Curbed)

Meet Roger the Sloth, the newest resident at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Does this arrest on the subway go too far? Guns were drawn amid a crowded car to arrest a man for fare evasion. (HuffPost)

The 7th annual Barnacle Parade will be held today (Tuesday) from 4-9 pm in Red Hook on Van Brunt St celebrating the neighborhood’s resiliency in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City Council voted to suspend Andy King for 30 days and fine him $15,000 after a report substantiated a whole list of claims against the member from the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Italian AOC is the best meme of the week. (Twitter)

It’s almost a cliche to hear a company say “unionizing won’t solve the workers’ concerns,” but here we are and of all companies to put that message forward, it’s Housing Works. (NY Times)

Would you be surprised to hear that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s dead presidential run was paid for by donors with city interests? (Politico)

25 of the best ramen bowls in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 11, 2019 – The “Persistence of the NYC Dollar Slice Joint” Edition

The mayor’s failed mayoral campaign promises, how to make the L train slower, a man jumped in the Gowanus, the city buys more ferries, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The city removed the jimson weed plant at 93rd and Columbus, but there’s another plant three blocks away on 96th and Columbus. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jumping into the Gowanus Canal, which has served as a toilet for the city for nearly a century, is pretty high on the “stupidest things you can do in NYC” list, but that didn’t stop some idiot from doing it on Saturday night. He was brought by the NYPD for a psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

Almost nothing is as New York City as the dollar slice joint. Accessible, fast, open all night and welcoming to everyone, these relatively new city staples popped up after the 2008 recession. While Barney’s and Dean & Deluca can’t keep up with NYC real estate, the dollar slice joint persists. (Huff Post)

Is Broadway ready for Robert O’Hara’s “Slave Play?” (NY Times)

The mayor ran for office on a promise to narrow the gap between the richest and poorest New Yorkers. After six years under his leadership, the gap has not changed according to a new report from the Manhattan Institute and the changes that have occurred can be attributed to state-wide and not city-wide initiatives. (Politico)

Animal rights groups weren’t thrilled with the “humane” rodent murder-bucket of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, calling his demonstration grotesque, barbaric, and sadistic and pointed out there are other generally accepted humane ways to eliminate rats that they city hasn’t implemented. (amNY)

The city’s $1.3 billion plan to protect the east side waterfront from Montgomery to E 25th St will get an independent review before moving forward. The city has a deadline of September 2022 to spend federal funding recovery funds allocated to the project (Curbed)

Of Bon Appétit’s 50 best new restaurants in America, 4 are in NYC. (Grub Street)

Were the predatory lending practices that targeted cabbies illegal? The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan is investigating if bank, wire, or mail fraud occurred. The NY Attorney General and the mayor’s office are also investigating. (Patch)

Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick are returning to Broadway in Neil Simon’s “Plaza Suite,” which will begin previews in March. (NY Times)

Every year there are between 100 and 200 cases of Legionnaires’ Disease in the city. The latest was found in residential towers in the Bronx’s Bedford Park. (Norwood News)

One in 15 of the city’s middle schoolers is vaping. (Patch)

The L train doesn’t need to run any slower than it already does, so whoever the jackass was that put their bicycle on the tracks, you are not appreciated. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city is buying three more ferries to add to its fleet for a total cost of $126 million. Taxpayers subsidize each ride by $10.75 on top of the $2.75 fare. The New York City Economic Development Corporation calls this “smart planning.” Is there any wonder that the city’s comptroller’s office isn’t happy with this “smart” plan? (Gothamist)

Photos from Bushwig 2019. (Gothamist)

Photos from DragCon 2019. (Gothamist)

The first of a two-part interview from The Root with Mayor de Blasio was released, covering topics like the Daniel Pantaleo firing, stop and frisk racial disparities, decriminalizing marijuana, raising the minimum wage, and more. (The Root)

The helicopter company that was facing backlash for taking dogs on doorless flights around Manhattan will no longer allow animals on their doors-off flights. (Patch)

A video montage of non-consensual touching by costumed weirdos in Times Square, prepared by the Times Square Alliance. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is seeking $2 billion in restitution from opioid manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacy benefit managers to help New Yorkers who have paid too much in insurance premiums over the past decade because of the opioid epidemic. (amNY)

A driver on Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn killed a 10-year-old boy after his SUV jumped the curb. No arrests were made or tickets were issued at the scene. (Streetsblog)

According to workers, Chipotle is abusing its employees nearly as much as its abusing the stomachs of anyone who eats there. (NY Times)

22 hidden gem private dining rooms in NYC. (Eater)


The Times’ coverage of the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. (NY Times)

The six moments of silence to honor the 2,983 victims of the attacks. (amNY)

Traditionally, the skylight of the Oculus opens on 9/11, but this year it will remain closed due to repairs after it was found to be leaking earlier this year. (Patch)

Remembering 9/11 from the staff of the Windows on the World restaurant, which was located on the 107th floor of the North Tower at the World Trade Center. (Grub Street)

Honoring the Ladder 118/Engine 205’s lost. (Brooklyn Heights Blog)