The Briefly for January 6, 2020 – The “Y2K Bug Arrives in NYC 20 Years Late” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The state’s new elevator safety law, a new minimum wage for (some) tipped workers, a Times Square institution closed, Brooklyn’s hottest restaurants, & more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 46˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

New York is the latest state to enact a state-wide elevator safety law, calling for state oversight of the elevator industry, establishing standards for elevator contractors, mechanics, and inspectors. Anyone think it’s weird this didn’t already exist? (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It’s hard not to make Y2K jokes when the city’s parking meters stopped accepting credit cards on January 1, 2020. This is the second time in a year that a city’s system has malfunctioned as a result of a lack up upgrading software. (BenYakas for Gothamist)

Speaking of parking tickets, Corey Johnson is proposing a “day fine” system, which is common in Europe. Instead of a fixed fee, which unfairly burdens low-income people, fines would be representative of a percentage of a person’s daily income. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo vetoed the Securing Wages Earned Against Theft bill that would have allowed employees to freeze the assets of their employer while a wage theft case is pending. (Max Parrot for QNS)

Meet Josh and Benny Safdie, the directing duo behind Uncut Gems. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Did you know there’s a secret H subway train? It was renamed to the Rockaway Park Shuttle in 1993, but it’s still out there if you look carefully. (Tribeca Citizen)

12 new public art installations not to miss in January. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

The mayor’s reaction to multiple deaths on Third Avenue in Brooklyn is to lower the speed limit from 30mph to 25mph. Lowering the speed limit without enforcement is akin to doing nothing, so the mayor has also promised a step up in enforcement. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Chepe, the Nevins Street raccoon was captured. He’ll be living out his days known as Chepe, the Prospect Park raccoon. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The state has a new minimum wage law for tipped workers, which doesn’t include restaurant or bar workers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

A look at the city’s new bail reforms from inside Manhattan’s criminal court. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A deep look at why some parents are freaking out about the city’s potential scrapping of the Gifted and Talented program. (Emily Shwake for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside The Deco, Midtown West’s new food hall. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The 13-year-old arrested in connection with Tessa Majors’s murder was denied a pre-trial release. and will remain in custody while awaiting the trial. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Times Square features the ridiculous version of everything. $30 Domino’s pizzas. A Red Lobster. And the planned TSX hotel will include an outdoor stage and ball drop suites. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Say farewell to the last of the “meat honkeytonks” in Times Square, Tad’s Steaks. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The Queens Public Library on the first floor of One Court Square will be closing at the end of the month. The library’s been in that location since 1989. If you remember, the building was supposed to become Amazon’s temporary office while their Long Island City campus was built, but since the deal fell through the developer of the building is making other plans. The library is looking for a new home. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

A dozen illuminated seesaws are coming to Broadway today (Monday) between 37th and 38th as part of the installation “Impulse.” The seesaws will create light and make music as well. Adding an installation in that spot is an annual tradition. Last year’s installation was an illuminated tunnel you could walk through that made sounds as people walked through it. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York is a city of signs, but of very few sign-painters. Travis Fitzsimmons of Prospect Lefferts Gardens makes hand-painted signs whose simplicity and style catch eyes. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Pizza Paradise, the nondescript and honestly sub-par pizza place in Flatiron, holds a secret. Inside is also Taste of Persia, which will be closing at the end of the month due to being told to close by the new owners. Owner Said Pourkay is looking for a new space. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Hells Angels’ supporters used to claim the block that housed their clubhouse on E 3rd was the safest block in the city. Some unknown gunmen tested that theory at their new clubhouse in Throggs Neck late on Thursday night. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Video: A look inside Joe’s Shanghai legendary soup dumplings. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The process hasn’t officially begun, but parents in Queens are organizing against desegregating schools in Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, Rego Park, and Jamaica. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Grand Street bike lane in Brooklyn is being upgraded today to physically separate cyclists from moving traffic and prevent drivers from parking in the bike lane. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

It’s the most mulch-iest time of year. (EV Grieve)

Fairway Market is filing for bankruptcy again. (David Cunningham for I Love the Upper West Side)

The city showed its support for the Jewish community over the weekend with a nearly 20,000 person march across the Brooklyn Bridge into Manhattan. (Christina Goldbaum and Matthew Sedacca for NY Times)

Photos: Inside the new East Village Trader Joe’s. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

A Chinatown bus with a station on Canal Street was involved in a horrific traffic accident early Sunday morning in Southwest Pennsylvania that killed five and injured sixty. (Bowery Boogie)

How can you make finding an apartment even less fun than it already is? Add Excel and decision matrices. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

You’ve got all week to prepare yourself. This weekend is The No Pants Subway Ride. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

In another depressing blow to sources of local news, amNewYork and Metro will be combining into one newspaper under the Schneps Media banner. It seems like Metro’s website will be eaten by amNewYork’s, which has been increasing filled using Associated Press stories instead of local reporters. The announcement doesn’t include the number of layoffs that will be involved. (amNewYork)

The hottest restaurants in Brooklyn for January. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for March 13, 2019 – The “Despite All My Rage I Am Still Just a Rat in a MetroCard Machine” Edition

The Hell’s Angels are leaving the East Village, inside Hudson Yards before the Friday opening, the Brooklyn Botanical Garden is fighting a rezoning, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Starting tonight you can see a live satellite video of the earth projected on the side of 159 Ludlow on the Lower East Side. The installation, called “blu Marble” is the work of Sebastian Errazuriz. (Bedford + Bowery)

New York has higher taxes than almost every other state, and we still cann’t fix the MTA. (Patch)

The MTA version of a double rainbow is the rat inside a MetroCard machine. (@SMarketingmusic) h/t to @theskint

The measles outbreak in the city’s ultra-Orthodox Jewish community can be traced back to a dial-in hotline for moms which spread misinformation. (NY Times)

186 arrests and 64 convictions have come from the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office initiative to test backlogged rape kits across the US. 55,000 kits have been tested since the project started in 2015. (NY Post)

The Trump administration is proposed decreasing the HUD budget by 16.4%, which could wind up being a massive hit to NYCHA’s federal funding. (Curbed)

The Trump Administration also balked on funding the Gateway rail project, calling the project a “local responsibility.” (6sqft)

A look inside the abandoned Time Square Theater. (Untapped Cities)

Some very good dogs will lead a blind runner through the NYC Half Marathon this weekend. (amNY)

State Senator Zellnor Myrie introduced a bill in the State Senate to restrict campaign contributions from anyone seeking government contracts and bar prospective vendors from contributing for six months after a contract is granted by the state. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is fighting against a 1,578 apartment development’s rezoning request. If approved, the pair of 39-story towers would cast a problematic shadow over 21 grow spaces and nurseries. The current zoning allows for 75-foot buildings. (6sqft)

A guide to this Sunday’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. (amNY)

The nutball restaurateur who flew himself to Seattle to try to convince Amazon to reconsider Long Island City isn’t done yet. Now he’s suing Councilperson Jimmy Van Brammer for defamation. (Gothamist)

Trump supporters created their own version of Yelp for MAGA-friendly businesses. While you could use the app to find these places, you can also use it to avoid them.. (The Daily Beast)

Ten-year-old Khadijah Sabir from Bensonhurst needs a new kidney. If you can help, please help. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The cleanup of the Red Hook ball fields resumed after the federal government shutdown. The EPA will remove six inches of soil and add 12 inches of clean fill and astroturf will cover all the fields. The last phase of the cleanup will be finished by spring 2023. (Bklyner)

A history of the Greenpoint piers. (Greenpointers)

Take a look inside Hudson Yards’ seven-story dining and shopping center ahead of Friday’s opening. (6sqft)

Multiple city burgers made it to this list of 35 burgers you need to eat before you die with Harlem Public’s Peanut Butter Burger topping the list. (Food Insider)

The BQE reconstruction, explained. (Curbed)

Everyone’s getting in on the history of the White Horse Tavern articles this week. Here’s another. (Gothamist)

How do NYC’s graduate schools rank among the top in the country? Hopefully as well as our burgers. (Patch)

No one is allowed to shower or use or drink the water at Brooklyn’s Methodist Hospital in Park Slope four months after a legionella bacteria outbreak in December. Anti-bacterial wipes have replaced hand washing and even showers. (Patch)

13,000 nurses could strike this month if negotiations fail between the New York State Nurses Association and a group of three major hospital systems. (Gotham Gazette)

The Hell’s Angels are vacating their East Village clubhouse, which they purchased in $1,700. The building was transferred for an unknown amount. Did you know the Hell’s Angels is a non-profit religious group in New York State? (Downtown Express)

Where to go when you don’t want to make a big deal about your birthday, but you actually do. (The Infatuation)

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