The Briefly for May 11, 2020 – The “A Huge Amount of Restraint by the NYPD” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo did not extend NY PAUSE past May 15, the Rent Guidelines Board explained, the NYC dessert delivery guide, Spike Lee’s NYC love letter, & more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 60˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

NY is not extending PAUSE through June 6. Early reporting stated that incorrectly. What happened over the weekend is Governor Cuomo extending New York’s state of emergency. Regions of the state that meet the state’s criteria will be opening, but in the city we can all but guarantee that we’re going last. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Apartment Porn: An Upper East Side Townhouse with an indoor pool, a wild spiral staircase, and a dining room larger than most apartments. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Details on the deal that resulted in New York paying some schmuck $86 million for ventilators that never materialized. Maybe New York is the schmuck in this deal. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Thomas Kaplan for NY Times)

Black and brown New Yorkers received more than 80 percent of social distancing summons handed out by the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I was on the floor, I thought I was going to die.” A first-hand account from Adegoke Atunbi of being arrested by the NYPD’s 75th precinct, the most-sued precinct in NYC. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

There’s been a huge amount of restraint by the NYPD” -Mayor de Blasio, on the very obvious bias in policing of social distancing observed anecdotally but also in numbers released by the NYPD. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

After a week of violent arrests of minority New Yorkers and criticism of how differently the NYPD is handling overcrowding in parks, the mayor decided to limit the number of people allowed Hudson River and Domino Park. That fixes everything, right? (NY1)

Take a look at the latest filings for Pacific Park, the set of apartment buildings planned for the Atlantic Yards. (Norman Odler for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Edible Queens will close at the end of the month, after a three-year run. Each Edible publication is independently owned. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Allowing bars and restaurants to sell cocktails to go has been a lifeline to some bars, but to the bars in the city whose appeal is the community and not the cocktails, they continue to struggle. The damage of the ongoing closure is putting the city’s remaining lesbian bars in danger. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

While restaurants are fighting to survive, Grubhub is reporting record revenue. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Whenever the city’s restaurants are allowed to open back up, expect reduced capacity and new social distancing rules to be put in place. If you thought going back to restaurants and bars was going to be the “all clear” signal, we’ll still have a long road ahead. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The first death of a child due to the syndrome linked to Covid-19 was reported at the end of last week. On Friday, there were 73 children in the state hospitalized because of the syndrome. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

NYC’s reaction to JetBlue’s low-altitude flyover was a general “could you please not?” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Gray’s Papaya on the Upper West Side has reopened. It’s not 24 hours (yet), but it’s nice to have an NYC institution back. (Carol Tannenhauser for West Side Rag)

Revel has continued its expansion during the pandemic, reaching into the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Rent Guidelines Board (RGB) will vote on June 17 on adjustments for the city’s 1 million rent-stabilized apartments for the coming year. Your questions from “What is the RGB?” to “When does their decision go into effect” explained. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Tae Kyong Kim and Jung Soo Lee have been arrested and charged with price gouging for selling face masks for $45 a pack at Whitestone grocery store Raspberry Farm. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Welcome to 2020, where heroin is branded “Coronavirus.” Over a million dollars of Coronavirus heroin and fentanyl was seized in a University Heights bust. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Spike Lee’s short film New York New York is “A Love Letter To It’s People. Plain And Simple”. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Governor Andrew Cuomo extended the deadline for filing new childhood sexual abuse claims under New York’s Child Victims Act from August 14, 2020, to January 14, 2021. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

This weekend my wife found a place on Franklin Ave in Crown Heights that put itself online as an ice cream delivery store. It’s a corner store, but they found their angle to get themselves online. They’re not the only ones, in another example of finding your angle to get online, Annie’s Blue Ribbon General Store in Park Slope has 1,000 piece puzzles for those of you clamoring for new puzzles. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Ben Benson, whose career took him from helping create TGI Friday’s, to creating Smith and Woolensky, to eventually creating his own steakhouse, Ben Benson’s. (Kim Severson for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio put NYC Health + Hospitals in charge of the city’s Covid-19 testing and tracing programs instead of the Department of Mental Health and Mental Hygiene, a decision universally disliked by the City Council, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and health officials. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

This week’s streaming performances from the Metropolitan Opera. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Over the weekend, as temperatures dropped into the 30s, the MTA still closed the subways for disinfecting, and provided “bus shelters” for the homeless New Yorkers that were removed from the trains overnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Op-ed: Acting New York City Transit president Sarah Feinberg in her own words on the subway shutdown. (Sarah Feinberg for amNewYork Metro)

Video: In defense of liking New York. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Who the hell thought it was a good idea for the Lower East Side’s open streets to only be open from 8am to noon? Doesn’t anyone know it’s a pandemic? Time has no meaning anymore! We can sleep until whenever we want! (Bowery Boogie)

What do you miss about New York? How about everything. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

The dessert delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for March 12, 2020 – The “Why is Mayor Bill de Blasio So Hated?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Expect six months before we return to pre-COVID19 normalcy, the best of Midtown East, Modell’s says goodbye, Harvey Weinstein is off to rot, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 49˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

The census begins today. Last time around, the city’s participation rate was 62%, compared to the national average of 76%. With as much effort the city and state have put into marketing the census, it’s gonna be mighty embarrassing if we maintain that low rate. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Why is DeBlasio so hated? (AskNYC)

Rapist and rotting ghoul Harvey Weinstein was sentenced to 23 years in prison. His layer had previously said that he may not outlive any sentence over five years. May he live a long life to experience every single day of that sentence. (Jen Ransom for NY Times)

Even Harvey Weinstein’s own body hates him, as he was hospitalized again with heart problems and chest pain. Let’s all hope he’s got great doctors because he has at least 23 years minus a day to live. (Dean Meminger for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Modell’s, who will be liquidating all of its stores starting Friday. The company is pointing to an unusually warm winter as the final nail in the coffin. If you gotta go to Mo’s, make sure it’s soon. (Crain’s)

The $3.2 million revamp of Woodside’s Little Bush Playground is set to start next month and should take about a year to finish. (Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

The Chelsea Hotel renovations continue to be an utter mess. Work has stopped because the building did not qualify for a Certificate of No Harassment with multiple tenants complaining about unlivable conditions dating back years. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Governors Island announced its free programming for the 2020 season, which starts on May 1. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

May we all be lucky to have birthday parties half as wild as 87-year-old Ray from Ray’s Candy Store. (Bob Krasner for amNewYork Metro)

Sometimes you don’t even have to go outside to birdwatch. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Crown Heights has a new vegan Ethiopian restaurant in Ras Plant Based. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The number of families in shelters each night was 46 percent higher last year than it was in December 2009, and one out of every 100 babies born in the city was brought to a shelter, rather than a permanent home. Needless to say, Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio did not earn high marks on The Coalition for the Homeless’ annual report. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

“I can now proudly call myself an NYC housing lottery winner.” One person’s story of how they won the lottery. (Kim Turner for StreetEasy)

Frank’s Cocktail Lounge in Fort Greene has been the backdrop to a changing neighborhood since the 1950s, and on April 10 of this year, that comes to an end. (S.E. Blackwell for East New York News)

Photos: A first look from the observation deck of Edge. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The lone Yelp review gave it four stars, but still called it “crack head city.” KN Mi Delicia Bakery and Coffee Shop in Mott Haven was part of a drug ring and multi-state 14-person arrest, with a raid finding $50,000 cash and bags stuffed with what is suspected to be heroin and cocaine. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Brooklyn Democratic Party’s leaders have endorsed Councilmember Donovan Richards for Queens borough president. (Alex Williamson for Brookly Eagle)

The city is beginning to experiment with, get this, actual dumpsters for businesses that will be set on the street to remove trash bag mountains that pile up on our sidewalks. It’s almost like the sidewalks should be for people to walk on, not for businesses to store trash on. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

26 excellent Midtown East bars and restaurants to try. (Alexandra Ilyashov for Eater)


Six months. According to the mayor, that’s how long the fight against COVID-19 will take before things return to normal again. Get ready for the worst summer ever. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic on restaurants will be akin to a major natural disaster. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Restaurants, open-air markets, and catering companies are expected to take a hard hit, Grub Street takes a look at how businesses are preparing to support their hourly staffs if at all. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

“We’re not in a position where we can rely on the CDC or the FDA to manage this testing protocol.” -Governor Cuomo. New York will start contracting 28 private labs to help administer coronavirus testing for New York residents. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Daytime talk shows filming in New York will be forgoing live studio audiences during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Kimberley Richards for HuffPost)

SUNY and CUNY schools will halt in-person classes for the rest of the semester, beginning on March 19. The dorms won’t be closing and classes that are impossible to hold remotely will still be held. (Niedzwiadek and Madina Touré for Politico)

Coronavirus fears may jeopardize the election process, which requires candidates to collect up to thousands of signatures of supporters. This may lead to the governor altering election law, as he did following Superstorm Sandy. (Max Parrott for QNS)

If you’re healthy, you should still consider dining out. The virus is not transmitted via food or drink. (Serena Dai for Eater)

An usher for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “Six” has tested positive for COVID-19. Both theaters underwent a deep clean, the shows are continuing, and the usher is now in quarantine. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Manhattan’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade is officially canceled. (Todd Maisel and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

How to help during the coronavirus outbreak. (Azi Paybarahf or NY Times)

A big thank you to reader Taina for today’s featured photo, taken in Red Hook.

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

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