The Briefly for January 12-15, 2020 – The “No, You Don’t Gotta Say That” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Vaccines available for group 1b, the best Thai restaurants, the High Line will be extended, Andrew Yang puts his foot in his mouth, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 40˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

A list of who is eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine. Groups 1a and 1b are currently eligible. You can also call the vaccine hotline at 888-364-3065. (NYC.gov)

After failing to disburse more than half of the federal funding in a COVID-19 rent relief program, New York opened a new application window in order to hand out the remaining $60 million. The application closes at the end of January, so get moving. (Emily Lang for Gothamist)

Vice President for Manhattanville Development at Columbia University, Marcelo Velez, is accused of engaging in sex acts with a girl under the age of 13 inside his New Jersey home. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Sometimes you gotta say Heil Hitler” – Republican candidate for Staten Island Boro President Leticia Remauro is apologizing for accidentally saying the quiet part out loud during a video she posted online protesting the closure of Mac’s Public House. (Chris Sommerfeldt and Cathy Burke for Daily News)

The NYPD’s investigation into Deputy Inspector James F. Kobel, who oversaw the NYPD’s Equal Employment Opportunity Division, was using a pseudonym online to hide his racist posts in a police officer message board. Kobel, a coward, filed for retirement last week. (William K. Rashbaum and Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Nicole Malliotakis’ Bay Ridge office was greeted by hundreds of protesters over the weekend, showing her just how appreciated her opposition to certifying the election results is with her constituents. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

An NYPD member is under investigation over accusations they participated in the attack on the Capitol. The mayor stated any city employee at the attack would be fired. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

William Pepe, a worker for Metro-North, “called out sick Wednesday to attend” the attack on the Capitol last week. He’s been suspended without pay pending an investigation. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A look into the Home Alone group show at the ATM Gallery on Henry Street. (EV Grieve)

New York state is looking to enact a law that would fine food delivery apps for creating listings for restaurants without their written permission. GrubHub currently adds local restaurants without the restaurants’ permission when they see local “demand.” (Christopher Robins for Gothamist)

Lap dances, karaoke, and secret parties. The NYC speakeasies of Covid-19. (Mihir Zaveri for NY Times)

Real Estate Lust: Six bedrooms, a front porch, side porch, rear deck, a driveway, built-in 1899 $2.6 million house in Prospect Park South. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)


Media Career Makeover
by Mediabistro

This is definitely the month to focus on your career, especially if you work in creative fields. That’s why Mediabistro, New York’s legendary creative careers community, is offering a four week online workshop (starting January 27th) to boost your career for 2021.

The Mediabistro Media Career Makeover will give you the tools, personal brand uplift, and grit to energize your freelance or full-time career with guidance from guest speakers and personalized feedback from a coach.

Special offer for The Briefly readers: As a reader of The Briefly, you can get a full 33% off the regular price right now with code thebriefly33 (about $100 in savings)! This discount was supposed to expire on 12/30, but Mediabistro extended it for The Briefly readers!

BOOK NOW before costs go up – offer expires on Friday, 1/15 – and do your career a giant favor to start off the year.


Queens Public Defenders are attempting to unionize and their management is calling them a “mob.” (Sam Mellins for New York Focus, in partnership with The City)

Sammy Revelo, Retired NYPD Lieutenant, declared his candidacy for Bronx Boro President. (Nowrood News)

One advantage of having Community Board meetings virtually is that anyone can show up, like Chuck Schumer, who popped into a CB2 meeting on the day after the attack on the Capitol. Maybe he needed a break from everything happening that week. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Speaking of Chuck, here’s what his future as Senate Majority leader means for NYC. (Jesse McKinley and Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Video: Meet Violet Brill, a 16-year-old urban forager. (Daniela Sirtori-Cortina for Bedford + Bowery)

Esquire’s list “100 Restaurants American Can’t Afford To Lose” includes 12 NYC restaurants, including Proto’s Pizza, Keens, Bar Tabac, and nine more. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Prismatica, an immersive art installation consisting of 25 rainbow-like prisms between 39th and 40th streets. The installation is by RAW Design in collaboration with ATOMIC3. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

A supervisor for the NYCHA certified an apartment lead-free, but it was never actually inspected. Now a child has lead poisoning. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

“We live in a two-bedroom apartment in Manhattan. And so, like, can you imagine trying to have two kids on virtual school in a two-bedroom apartment, and then trying to do work yourself?” –Andrew Yang actually gave that quote to the Times about spending most of his time outside of New York City while he’s thinking about running for mayor of New York City. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

14 hours later, Andrew Yang was on the defensive while all the other mayoral candidates saw an opportunity to pounce. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

The city’s Independent Budget Office says that jobs won’t bounce back until at least 2024, but the state and city’s budget hole initially predicted wouldn’t be as bad as predicted. (Greg David for The City)

Dr. Fauci told the conference of the Association of Performing Arts Professionals that live concerts could return “some time in the fall of 2021,” depending on reaching herd immunity. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

We are not going to achieve any levels of population immunity or herd immunity in 2021” -WHO’s chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan. (Science Alert)

Interview Emily Gallagher started her term as a state assembly member representing the state’s 50th district. (Julia Kott for Greenpointers)

“Why is New York spending so much money on giant waiting room/malls that all have nowhere to sit? And what does this say about how we’ve chosen to treat our public spaces and transit infrastructure? Must we make every public space so inhospitable to the people using it or can we find a better way?”
-Benjamin Kabak, Some thoughts on Moynihan Train Hall and designing public spaces with nowhere to sit, for Second Ave Sagas

The High Line will be extended to connect to the new Moynihan Train Hall. The $60 million project does not have an expected completion date yet. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If you’ve got the bitcoin, you could be the new owner of Hellcat Annie’s Tap Room and Scruffy Duffy’s on Tenth Avenue. Two bars for 25 bitcoins, which works out to be about $862k. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Every business is Schrödinger’s cat during the pandemic. Despite rumors to the contrary, Economy Candy is still alive. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Sorry Upper West Side crafters, Michael’s on Columbus Ave is closing. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

The governor’s State of the State address (watch the 43-minute speech here) is an outline to “win” the Covid war, but not without a lot of help from Washington. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio will likely be remembered for two terms of broken promises. In July he promised to accelerate his “affordable” high-speed internet plan for public housing and low-income areas hit hard by the pandemic. IT’s been six months and the city has not made a single deal on the initiative the mayor has been talking about since 2013. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The best Thai restaurants in NYC, if you’re ready. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, and Arden Shore for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for October 9-10, 2020 – The “$75 Hot Dogs for People Who Hate Having $75” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Protests in Boro Park, another shutdown takes hold, the Trump Wall of Lies defaced, the MTA’s secret Money Train, & the everything pizza bagel

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 68˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 58˚ High: 76˚

Today is your last day to register to vote. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Bed-Stuy is the fourth coolest neighborhood in the world, behind Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong, Downtown Los Angeles, and Esquerra de l’Eixample, Barcelona, citing The Billie Holiday Theatre, Harold and Maude Vintage, and Peaches HotHouse while calling it the “greatest incubator of the future.” (Will Gleason for Time Out)

That didn’t take long. The Bushwick “Wall of Lies” from President Trump was vandalized with “Vote Trump or Die” and “Stand Back and Stand By.” (Jessy Edwards for The Brooklyn Reporter)

What abomination is this? Pizza with everything bagel crust. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

“Italy has one of the richest histories in Western civilization and was the birthplace of the Renaissance which gave us countless great thinkers, artists, scientists and the likes to choose from that didn’t cause the strife and crimes against humanity that Columbus is guilty of. This isn’t about rewriting history, this is simply about righting a wrong.”
-Ed García Conde, From The Bronx to Italian Americans With Love: It’s Time to Let Go of Columbus for Welcome2TheBronx

The MTA had an armored money train that traveled to a secret “money room” in Downtown Brooklyn as recently as 2006. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

“There is something here that needs to be fixed right away. And that’s why I’m being abundantly clear it will be fixed today and made public. Violence is unacceptable.” The mayor said a lot of words but provided no specifics of how policing was going to change on Thursday night. (Christopher Robbins and Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Meet Harold “Heshy” Tischler, who is running for City Council, had this to say about Chirlance McCray: “And if you think, Mrs. de Blasio…retard, woman, crook, whatever you are, you think you’re gonna get elected to borough president? You will not be elected.” This is disgusting and I suggest that Mr. Tischler apologize, end his campaign for City Council, and think long and hard about what it takes to be an adult. Mr. Tischler made these comments during a protest against new state-imposed restrictions due to a flare-up in Covid-19 cases in Borough Park. (Jocelyn Grzeszak for Newsweek)

In the second night of protests in Borough Park, Jacob Kornbluh, an Orthodox Jewish reporter, was chased through the streets and called “Nazi” and “Hitler” by a large violent crowd let by Heshy Tischler. Borough Park’s Covid-19 positive test rate was 10.6%. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

“This impending holiday would be less of a concern if ultra-Orthodox communities were universally following the city’s coronavirus guidance. But many of them are not. And while the responsibility for this conduct clearly rests foremost with them, the city has done everything it can to ensure that its entreaties go unheard and its declarations are rejected. This is not responsible governance, and it could cost people their lives.”
-Yair Rosenberg, There’s a Way to Avert the Looming Coronavirus Crisis in Hasidic Brooklyn. But the City Needs to Choose It Right Now. for Tablet

As you might expect, there is already a lawsuit claiming the state’s new Covid-19 shutdown is “unconstitutional.” (Georgia Kromrei with research by Orion Jones for The Real Deal)

“I understand it will be confusing to some to implement, but that’s because we’re not used to this kind of geographically tailored COVID plan.” -Dr. Jessica Justman, an epidemiologist and infectious disease specialist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health who argues the state’s plan is worth trying. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Here’s what is known about the city’s latest Covid-19 shutdowns. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

The city released an interactive map to see if you fall within the boundaries of the vague zones drawn by the state. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

NYU passed the state’s threshold of 100 Covid-19 cases in 14 days, which should trigger a school to transition to all-remote learning. NYU will stay open. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

More than half of the city’s public school students are now enrolled in remote learning. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

With lease signings near pre-pandemic levels, it seems that the Manhattan “exodus” is slowing down. (Greg David for The City)

Photos: A look back in time at the Limelight. If you’re old enough and we in the city, you’ve got a few stories about wild nights at the Limelight. (Daniela Kirsch, photos by Steve Eichner for Patch)

Cringe-city, population” this video de Blasio made mocking President Trump. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Maya Wiley has made her mayoral hope official. Wiley is a former lawyer for the city and an MSNBC analyst. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Where to eat the Filipino dish sisig. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Video: Check out the Meatpacking District in 1993. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

Photos: October 4 was the Feast Day of St. Francis of Assisi, which means photos of animals getting blessed. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Yeah, you might know that Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux co-designed Central Park, but dig deeper and learn about Andrew Haswell Green, the driving force behind getting Central Park made. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Cy Vance Jr got the go-ahead from yet another judge to see President Trump’s tax returns. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

RIP Jim Dwyer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, columnist, and author. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

Photos: A look at Pier 55, the new floating park on the Hudson River. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If you need an uplifting story for your Friday, here’s how neighbors in Ditmas Park rallied to save Benji the cat. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

An interactive map with what’s open in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

The lawsuit was appealed as high as it could go, and the 21 artists in the lawsuit against the 5Pointz developer who destroyed their work in violation of the Visual Artists Rights Act will finally be awarded the $6.75 million they are owed. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The Standard High Line Hotel is selling a $75 hot dog. $75!!! (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Terri for today’s featured photo of Brooklyn Hi-Art! Machine’s installation at the Prospect Park Bandshell.

The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “A Love Letter to the Salt Bagel” Weekend Edition

Fighting this weekend’s planned ICE raids, more people are staying put in Brooklyn and Queens, the city’s speed camera program starts to expand and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The president’s ICE raids scheduled to take place this weekend have included New York as a target. The governor announced anyone in need of assistance may contact the Liberty Defense Project via the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 or liberty@dos.ny.gov.

What should you do if ICE is at your door or the door of someone you know? Here are the ACLU’s guidelines and outlines of your rights. (ACLU)

The Amazon Web Services Summit at the Javitz Center drew crowds protesting Amazon’s involvement with ICE with their Rekognition Video system. (amNY)

Riding the subway still sucks, but it sucks the least its sucked since 2013, with an on-time performance over 80%. (Curbed)

Check the trains before you venture out this weekend. This is the last weekend of reduced L train service before the multi-week night and weekend partial shutdown starts and remains through January. (Subway Weekender)

R. Kelly was arrested by the NYPD and Homeland Security in Chicago on federal sex trafficking charges and is expected to be brought to New York to face those charges. (NBC New York)

A love letter to the salt bagel. (Eater)

The NYPD claims to have figured out the reason for an uptick of shootings in northern Brooklyn: District Attorney Eric Gonzalez. The NYPD is blaming a program where weapons-possession offenders can plead guilty and take part in an educational program instead of being jailed. Putting the blame on this program has two flaws. The program is a decade old, the uptick in shootings are only in one portion of the borough while the program is borough-wide, and it does not apply to anyone who has used a gun, only those possessing them. (Brooklyn Paper)

Have mannequin, will carpool. A hero from New Jersey was pulled over on the Verrazzano Bridge for trying to using his “friend” as a reason to use the HOV lane. (Gothamist)

The photos your friends post to Instagram from Storm King are nice and all, but have you thought about who’s job it is to mow the grass? Meet Mike Seaman, who leads a seven-person crew. (NY Times)

Much like Williamsburg, the neighborhood it calls home, the Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel and San Paolino di Nola is changing with the times. For the first time organizers opened up the carrying of the giglio, a four-ton and 72-foot-tall spire, and a life-size sculpture of a boat, to outsiders. This Sunday is giglio Sunday. (NY Times)

Irving Plaza is closed for eight months to be renovated. (EV Grieve)

The city provides about 146 square feet of green space per resident, which is smaller than a 12 foot by 12-foot room. Of the fifteen major cities in the story, New York was dead last. (Patch)

Speaking of green space, Shirley Chisholm State Park can lay claim to the title of “the city’s nicest park built on top of a toxic dump.” (Curbed)

In reflection of its 20th year, Untapped Cities sat down with Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond to discuss his favorite places in the city, future public projects, the Spur, and more. (Untapped Cities)

The latest step in a neighbor-feud in Kew Gardens is a bloody splattered mannequin who seems to be daring neighbors to call 311 against it. A truly amazing amount of pettiness. (Gothamist)

The expansion of the city’s speed camera program kicked off this week. The city will add 40-60 cameras a month until the number reaches 750 from the current 140. (Curbed)

“Slave Play,” a look at race relations through the prism of the sexual hangups of three interracial couples, is coming to Broadway this spring and will run for 17 weeks. (NY Times)

The reunited The Misfits announced their first-ever show at Madison Square Garden, tickets are on sale next week. (BrooklynVegan)

How Darren Walker, a gay black man who grew up poor in Texas, came to be one of the best-connected people in New York City. And what that means for the future of philanthropy. (NY Times)

A photo gallery of Coney Island through the years. (amNY)

The Parks Department publicly apologized to the family of Robert Sommer, who was one of the fifteen cyclists killed by drivers this year, for removing his memorial ghost bike in Marine Park without notifying his family first. (Brooklyn Paper)

Would you pay $275 to be a guest on a podcast? Say what you want, but it’s working for Uluç Ülgen, the host of mürmur, a podcast that is “part performance art, part social documentary, part mystical, and part comedy.” If you don’t want to pay the fee to appear, you can always subscribe on iTunes. (Bedford + Bowery)

A taxi jumped the curb and crashed into a Westville in Hell’s Kitchen on Ninth Avenue Westville. Five people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and three declined medical attention. No reason was released for the driver’s actions. (Gothamist)

The Washington Square Park “Die-In” to bring attention to the crisis created by the failures of the mayor’s Vision Zero program has worked. Nearly every media outlet in the city has written about it, and it has now received the New York Times treatment. (NY Times)

More and more people in Brooklyn and Queens are choosing to renew their leases instead of moving to new apartments. Rants in both boroughs are up, but rents in Queens are down 4.2% since May. (The Real Deal)

Mia Simmons, the 20-year-old woman charged with manslaughter for the stabbing death of 30-year-old Latanya Watson, was defending herself according to her lawyer. Video footage shows the pair fighting on the platform and Simmons’s lawyer claims Watson was the aggressor. (Gothamist)

An Ed Sheeran pop-up shop will be open on Wooster Street today from 3:06 through 9:06. Now you know where to go or where to avoid, depending who you are. (amNY)

Say hello to the Carrot Dog, the humane twist on the New York staple, which are now available ay by CHLOE. Delightful, disgusting, or both? (Gothamist)

Whoops, the Time Out Market in Dumbo was shut down by the Department of Health. The food hall is expected to be reopened shortly. (Eater)

The MTA’s rules restrict the kinds of secondary jobs its workers can hold, which three dozen violated by moonlighting as Lyft /Uber drivers without agency permission. Five were fired. (Patch)

The governor won’t sign a bill that would loosen restrictions on affidavit ballots that would also retroactively decide the contested Queens DA race. (Jackson Heights Post)

After the arrest of Tyresse Singleton for the alleged burning of rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge in Harlem, a new set of flags are proudly waving. (amNY)

A look inside the bribery and corruption of two men who are partially responsible for the current taxi medallion financial crisis. (NY Times)

Everyone has a friend who always chooses the most expensive restaurant possible and the bill for the eight of you looks like someone’s rent instead of a bill for the meal. That’s the inspiration behind the list of the best restaurants for affordable group dinners. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.