The Briefly for February 6, 2020 – The “No More Paying Brokers Fees For Rentals” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo targets bridges for fare evasion, Prada settles a blackface lawsuit, where to eat in Industry City, High Maintenance, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 45˚
Rain throughout the day.

Everything you need to know about New York’s new plastic bag ban. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is the “Molten Chocolate Body Scrub” weird or soothing with its cocoa scrub and chocolate mask? It’s both. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is it better to rent or buy in NYC? There’s no one answer for anyone in the city. (Ameena Walker)

Landlord, not tenants, will now be forced to foot the bill for New York City’s notoriously high brokers fees, following new guidance issued by the NY Department of State. Maybe renting IS better! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Apartments without roommates with rent under $1,800 actually exist in the city, and here’s five of them. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

There have been no confirmed cases of coronavirus in the city but two more people have been quarantined due to a possible infection. This brings the total number of currently suspected cases to four, the first case was determined not to be coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A jackass in Chinatown attacked a mask-wearing woman in what is being investigated as a hate crime by the NYPD and the Hate Crime Task Force. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

You’ve got until February 13th if you want to put yourself into the lottery for the NYC Marathon. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

A year after Amazon cried its way back to Seattle, the Queens Chamber of Commerce has launched its “Relocate to Queens” campaign. (Bill Parry for QNS)

A 24-year-old man from Oklahoma allegedly stumbled into New York City, visited a guy he met on a dating app, killed him, and blew the slain man’s money all over the city, according court documents from the Manhattan district attorney’s office. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Governor Cuomo’s Penn Station plan, by the numbers. (C.J. Hughes for The Real Deal)

Governor Cuomo is taking his fare evasion road show to the state’s bridges and tunnels, making evading a bridge toll to misdemeanor “theft of services.” Any Churro vendors on the Throggs Neck Bridge better watch out. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Welcome to the stretch of I-95 from the George Washington Bridge and stretching into the Cross Bronx Expressway, the fifth most dangerous spot in the nation for car crashes. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Signs for the Verrazzano Bridge have never been spelled correctly, thanks to an error on the contract for the bridge’s construction. That has been corrected. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

In an effort to fight postpartum depression, every first-time parent in New York City will soon be eligible to receive as many as six home visits from professionals for postnatal mental health care. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

New York City’s Department of Education consistently failed to follow requirements for annual lead-paint inspections in schools over the last five years, records show. No shit. (Christopher Werth for Gothamist)

An interview with the creators of High Maintenance on the fourth season of the show on keeping the show fresh, their collaboration with This American Life, Larry Owens, and more. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Restaurant workers are protesting the $15 minimum wage. Why? Because Governor Cuomo has twice raised the minimum wage to $15 for “everybody” and excluded them twice. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Meet the women behind Monumental Women, the group behind Central Park’s first statue of a woman. (Currie Engel for NY City Lens)

Two gangs from Brooklyn who are said to be responsible for at least 13 shootings, homicides and other crimes, were charged in a 122-count indictment after cops arrested 34 members and seized 16 guns in “Operation Boxed In.” The gangs were named, and this is seriously their names, the Wooo and the Choo. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Prada has agreed to a “groundbreaking” restorative justice agreement with the NYC Commission on Human Rights after using blackface imagery in their products and displays in their stores. They’ll create a scholarship and paid internship for racial minorities, make a commitment to recruit underrepresented employees, appoint a diversity officer, and everyone in the company will undergo racial equality training. This would be commendable if it wasn’t being forced on them as part of settling a lawsuit. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Manny Teixeira is the city’s longest-serving doorman, working in the same building since 1965., taking over for his father. (CBS New York)

Arthur Schwartz, the attorney for loud and angry wealthy white boomers and the man who tried to stop the 14th St busway, has turned his attention towards attempting to stop the East Side Coastal Resiliency project’s installation of a seawall in East River Park. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Tanay Warerkar, Erika Adams, and Luke Fortney for joining the team at Eater. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio’s approval rating is lower than President Trump’s. He’s a lame duck with two years to go. His presidential campaign was DOA. Can the mayor do anything to excite New Yorkers again? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio pushed back against a story from President Trump’s State of the Union that claims New York’s sanctuary city policy led to the murder of a Queens woman, accusing the president of trying to “exploit” the victim’s death. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The Strand is coming to the location of the now closed Book Culture on the Upper West Side. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

From March of 1965: Burying Malcolm X (Marlene Nadler for Village Voice)

The case of who killed Malcom X may be reopened 55 years after his death. (John Leland for NY Times)

Where to eat in Industry City. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 5, 2019 – The “Fight of the Year: Duck vs Subway Car” Edition

In today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber’s top tourist destination, Parks takes over the city’s mass grave island, the Mets have a new owner, the best latkes in the city, and more.

The latest restaurant openings with potential. (The Infatuation)

Hart Island, the country’s largest taxpayer-funded mass-grave site, is now under the control of the Department of Parks instead of the Department of Corrections. New York City has been burying its veterans, its poor, its anonymous, and those infected in the early days of the AIDS crisis for over a century. The Department of Parks is tasked with providing access to the public for visitation of the million bodies buried on the 131 acre island. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Anthony Benedetto’s art is on display at the Art Students League. Maybe you know him as Tony Bennett. (Untapped New York)

In the fight of duck vs subway car, ducks win. A duck wandered on its way onto the tracks of the N train in Brooklyn, causing the train line to come to a complete stop while this terrible little scamp was removed. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The 10 neighborhoods to watch in real estate in 2020, with no real surprises. Williamsburg wouldn’t have made the cut if the L train had been shutdown, but it’s sitting at #1 instead. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Say hello to seven recipients of the 11th Annual Sloan Awards for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics in New York City Public High Schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: The tree lighting ceremony at Rockefeller Center. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

11-year-old Charlotte Nebres is making history as the first Black dancer cast in the leading role of Marie in the New York City Ballet’s production of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker.” (Kimberley Richards for HuffPost)

The best latkes in the city. (Leah Koenig for Grub Street)

After months of negotiation and multiple threats of a transit strike, the MTA and Transport Workers Union Local 100 have reached an agreement. The details won’t be publicly available until after the contract is ratified by TWU 100 members. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Take a look inside Christina Hendricks’s apartment on W 56th. The 800 square foot apartment is on the market after her divorce to Geoffrey Arend. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The Mets have a new majority owner in billionaire Steve Cohen, who increased his investment by $2.6 billion. Cohen became a minority owner in 2008 after former majority owners the Wilpons were caught up in the Bernie Madoff scandal. Unfortunately for the Mets the Wilpons will stay on as CEO and COO for the next five years. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Watch videos from the final performance at Brooklyn Bazaar. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The best vegetarian restaurants on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

What to see, eat and drink near Brooklyn’s new Wegmans. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Despite its designation as a “public place” since 1974, architects and developers showed a plan to build nearly one thousand apartments on a 5.8 acre site on the corner of Smith St and Fifth St in Gowanus. Brad Lander, who has been excessively bullish on rezoning Gowanus and adding over 8,000 apartments to the small neighborhood, pushed the development at a Community Board meeting on Monday. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The story of the Taxi King, his rise to power and crash back to earth. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

One thing that won’t be returning to Lincoln Center after its half-billion dollar renovation is Richard Lippold’s 190-foot-long, 39-foot-high sculpture Orpheus and Apollo. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The top destination in the city for Uber trips by tourists in the city is as obvious as it gets: The Empire State Building. It was actually the #1 destination on the planet. The most popular place in the entire state was the Queens Center Mall in Elmhurst. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Applications for middle and high school are due Friday, December 6. Here’s what you need to know. (Amy Zimmer and Christina Veiga for ChalkBeat)

The tragedy of the red horse hopper, told in three photos. (EV Grieve)

Why the census has always been controversial in New York City. (Diana Buds for Curbed)

The trailer for the fourth season of High Maintenance was released this week, with the show returning in early February. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Everyone could use a story with a happy ending. When Ashley Patrick left her purse with her wallet, headphones and a pair of gloves for her son on the Q train, she assumed they’d never find their way home. Let’s call this one a holiday miracle. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

NYC’s 11 most festive bars and restaurants. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)