The Briefly for September 4 – 5, 2020 – The “A Real Turd of an Idea From Cuomo” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest on indoor dining, mall and gym reopenings, indoor and outdoor schooling, the rolled-up cheese sandwich, 13 to-go negronis, and more

Today – Low: 67˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 66˚ High: 81˚

What’s open and closed on Labor Day. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

62% of New Yorkers believe the worst is yet to come when it comes to Covid-19, according to a Siena College Research Institute poll. 82% believe the state will face another large outbreak in the fall. Who says New Yorkers aren’t optimistic? Apparently New Yorkers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The bonkers story of Gennaro Brooks-Church and Loretta Gendville, the eco-yogi slumlords of Brooklyn. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

A rolled-up cheese sandwich, a cup o noodles, Pop-Tarts, and the other Bushwick-esque foods being offered by bars in, yes, Bushwick. (Jackson Schroeder for Bushwick Daily)

A year ago, the city’s jobless rate was at 4.3%. This year unemployment is sitting at 20%. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The first statue of historical women in Central Park was unveiled, Women’s Rights Pioneers Monument, featuring Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A Ford Taurus drove into a group of protesters on Thursday night in Times Square, injuring multiple people protesting the killing of Daniel Prude. The NYPD declined to say if the driver had been arrested. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The New York City public school system’s reopening will be delayed, with “instructional transition and orientation” starting remotely on September 16th and in-person learning pushed back to September 21st. (Sophia Chang, Jen Chung, and Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

“We’re trying to move heaven and earth to try to get buses in place by the first day of school.” How is it possible that the city has had the entire summer to get ready for schools to open and it’s not a given that the city’s children will have buses to bring them to school. According to the executive director of pupil transportation, “it’s really a day-to-day scenario.” (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The City Council met to hear concerns about Mayor de Blasio’s school opening plans. 140 people spoke, not one of them was a Department of Education official. According to one of de Blasio’s advisors, we’ll see”a resurgence.” Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer said she allocated $12 million for ventilation system upgrades in schools and the money hasn’t been spent, despite the city claiming poverty. School starts on September 21 and in-person classes start one week later. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Success Academy, the city’s largest charter school system, is going completely remote for the remainder of 2020a first look at what Covid-19 outdoor classes will look like. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Several city school teachers are filing for injunctive relief against the city and Chancellor Richard Carranza, asking a judge to block in-person learning at the city’s public schools. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

“Since coronavirus is less likely to spread outdoors, letting all New York City schools hold class in public parks and on cordoned-off city streets, on its face, seems like a positive development. But I didn’t need to read the fine print to know that our immigrant, Black, and brown communities — the ones that have been hit hardest by the COVID-19 crisis — would get the short end of the stick. I didn’t need to know who organized and petitioned for outdoor learning to know that the “nice white parents,” a perennial force for maintaining inequities in one of the nation’s most segregated school systems, would get their way. Again.”
-Lynn Shoh, a public school teacher, I advocate for outdoor learning. But NYC’s plan for it will further privilege ‘nice white parents’ for Chalkbeat

Diddy and educational speaker Dr. Steve Perry announced on Thursday that they are opening their latest charter school, Capital Prep Bronx, which aims to provide “historically disadvantaged” students with a standout curriculum, in order to prepare them with “college and career readiness skills.” (J’na Jefferson for The Root)

J’Ouvert festivities are canceled, but that isn’t stopping the NYPD from stepping up their presence this weekend in Brooklyn. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

A look at the history of the NYPD’s computerized system CompStat and why NYPD captains want to stop its usage. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

The NYPD’s Police Benevolent Association endorsed Donald Trump president, which was a surprise to the Guardians Association, a fraternal order of Black police officers, who called the endorsement a “lack of respect” and takes police to “a dark place.” Let’s be honest here, the NYPD endorsing Trump is as surprising as your very obviously racist uncle from Alabama telling you about his collection of knives from WWII that just so happen to be from Germany. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Bronx Country District Attorney Darcel Clark announced that she would move to dismiss more than 300 of the curfew summonses issued during protests in Mott Haven on June 4. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

In the wake of the death of Layleen Polanco, the mayor said the NYPD should not be arresting people for sex work. The mayor has no authority over what the NYPD does and does not do and it’s up to district attorneys to decide to press charges against people who have been arrested. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

There are 200 people in city jails due to technical parole violations, lower than last year’s 726, but mostly due to Governor Cuomo’s push to reduce jail populations du to Covid-19 fears. Criminal justice advocates are pushing for the number to be zero. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Does the mayor have any authority in this city? Mayor de Blasio asked community boards to voluntarily lay off some of their pad staff to help contribute to the city’s $9 billion budget shortfall. The answer from some boards was “no.” (Kevin Duggan for Brownstoner)

Add the Barclays Center to MSG as a polling site this November, making both the largest polling site in their respective boroughs. (David Gannon for 6sqft)

Noticing a whole lot more “no-fee” apartments throughout the city? Pandemic, pandemic, pandemic. Normally in August, there might be 50% of all apartments in Brooklyn and Manhattan. This year the number is closer to 75 or 85%. (Michael Kolomatsky for NY Times)

RIP Tom Seaver, the Mets’ greatest player. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

Have you received a random copy of The Epoch Times, which is also known as “garbage?” You’re not alone. The pro-Trump newspaper was suddenly delivered to people in multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods surrounding Bed Stuy. (Jessy Edwards for The Brooklyn Reader)

A look at U Thant Island, Manhattan’s smallest island that’s also off-limits to the public. Wanna go visit? U Thant! I’ll be here all weekend. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

I’ll admit this has been a lot of bad news, but here’s a palate cleanser for you. 25 quotes about New York that fill us with immeasurable pride. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Photos: Rockefeller Center’s new major sculpture installation. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Governor is allowing malls will be reopening in the city on September 9. Food courts and other eateries will remain closed and no mallrats. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Myths and secrets of the Grand Central Clock. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The city is lowering the speed limit on nine roads to 25 miles an hour, the standard speed limit on city roads. This includes parts of Riverside Drive, Flatbush Ave, Northern Blvd, Bruckner Blvd, Short Parkway Service Rd, Dahlgren Pl, Webster Ave, and Targee St. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Apartment Porn: Four outdoor spaces, a wine cellar, and a ludicrously large shower can be found in shis $6 million Park Slope brownstone.

Another portion of the Highline, The Spur, is reopening to the public this weekend (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Alaska and Montana for making the NY Covid-19 quarantine list. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A makeshift Breonna Taylor memorial has popped up outside St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery. (EV Grieve)

Here’s what to expect inside the city’s newly reopened gyms. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Over 60% of restaurants and bars in the state are “likely” or “somewhat likely” to permanently close by next year, according to a New York State Restaurant Association survey of 1,042 responses. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Over 300 restaurants are suing the city for $2 billion for the city’s ongoing indoor dining plan. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

What’s the latest on indoor dining from the mayor? In his ever-changing public comments about it, he’s now pivoted to saying that there will be an answer by the end fo the month. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo has a real turd of an idea. According to the governor, indoor dining could resume in NYC if the NYPD enforces compliance of regulations. Maybe he doesn’t remember why the NYPD was pulled from enforcing social distancing in the first place? It looks like an NYPD officer not wearing a mask properly with his knee on the neck of a person of color on the sidewalk. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Eater is keeping a running list of restaurants that have permanently closed. (Eater)

Opposite of that list, here’s a list of new restaurants that opened in NYC. (Eater)

The 21 most in-demand NYC outdoor dining reservations. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

13 to-go Negronis you can grab today. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for September 1, 2020 – The “A $3.75 Reduced-Service Subway Ride” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The latest with school openings, the mayor wants a vaccine before indoor dining returns, where to eat outside in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 78˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

Today (Sept 1), the United Federation of Teachers’ executive board will meet to vote to authorize a strike at 3:30 pm. From a friend, I’ve heard the teachers will push for an October opening of school for in-person instruction. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Looking to make a temporary change in your address? The Times has some service journalism for you to make sure your mail gets delivered. (A.C. Shilton for NY Times)

Free bus rides are over. Front boarding started on Monday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A bus or subway fare could be raised a dollar, as hinted by MTA officials, paired with a 40% reduction in service, in an attempt to close the $9 billion gap in the MTA’s budget. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

Five cheap ways to improve the subway from a policy analyst from the Manhattan Institute. Not all of these ideas are good. (Connor Harris for Streetsblog)

There is no combination of state efforts that can address New York’s financial crisis. The full damage that the Covid-19 virus has laid upon New York state is $59 billion, meaning there is no possible way the state can tax its way out of this hole. Watch this argument carefully, because Governor Cuomo will use this to defend his decision to never increase taxes on the state’s super-rich. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state kicked the can down the road, but October 1 is the new date for the tidal wave of evictions when the moratorium ends. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The mayor created his own deadline of October 1 to either cut one billion from the city’s costs from labor or he would fire 22,000 municipal employees. On Monday, the day city employees were ready to hear about who was “at-risk” for being fired, the mayor announced that unions have asked for more time to resolve the issue. The sword of Damocles still hangs. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

September 1 gives us two months left of outdoor dining in NYC. As bars and restaurants look ahead, the question becomes “How do we survive this?” A spotlight on Jeremy’s Ale House, who doesn’t see past Halloween, unless people are allowed inside. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The biggest question looming over the city might not be “when will The Briefly return to five days a week?,” but “when is indoor dining coming back?” The mayor’s answer seems to change every day. In the last week, he’s said that the school openings would dictate it, that it wouldn’t return until the new year, and now until we see a vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How much is a life worth? Layleen Polanco’s family was awarded $5.9 million after her death after nine days in solitary confinement at Rikers Island while being held on $500 bail, a record for an inmate’s death. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The NYPD has issued a “discipline penalty matrix” that outlines specific punishments for instances of police misconduct. This isn’t in response to recent violence from the NYPD against the citizens it is supposed to protect, but form the recommendation of a 2018 independent panel. Despite the matrix, the NYPD Commissioner has the ability to ignore the matrix. The NYCLU says this is no reason to celebrate because it doesn’t show a culture of change in the NYPD and Commissioner Shea and Mayor de Blasio’s comments appear to be on the side of protecting police officers. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A 2017 NYPD “challenge coin” from East Flatbush is so racist you may have to see it to believe it that celebrates the “hunting of man” and features a caricature of a black man with dreadlocks with the shadow of a deer. (Jon Campbell for Gothamist)

Riis Park’s popularity in the last few years partially has Riis Park Beach Bazaar to thank. The lease for Riis Park Beach Bazaar is up and won’t be renewed. Instead, they have been invited to submit a proposal to compete with other vendors. (The Rockaway Times)

This is what life is like when you’re quarantined in an apartment with Miss Universe and Miss USA. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Gyms in the city will be virtually inspected before reopening on Wednesday. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Yeah, you’ve been to Governors Island, but have you been to the haunted basketball court on Governors Island? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Sutphin Blvd-Archer Ave. and Jamaica Center-Parsons/Archer E train stations will be closed from September 19 through November as the MTA replaces 5,500 feet of track and more than 7,800 feet of third rail. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s pronounced “How-stun.” Here’s why. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

One of the three lawsuits blocking the Two Bridges megadevelopment was reversed, but it’s still not a green light to move forward. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s land use review process comes back mid-month, which will mean Gowanus will become the epicenter of the fight over redevelopment in the city. (Amy Plitt for BKLYNER)

“The fight against Industry City has implications beyond the neighborhood. It has implications for any of us who see the city as a site of civic engagement, as a place where community thrives. It’s community, the very idea of it, that’s destroyed, as the privatization of neighborhoods grows bolder and less restrained.”
– Peter Rugh, Sunset Park is Afraid of Industry City’s Expansion, The Rest of Us Should Be Too for The Indypendent

The Mermaid Inn in the East Village is closing. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A look at waacking and its history from dance clubs in the city in the 70s and how it ended up as a Tik Tok sensation. (Ted Alcorn, video by Mohamed Sadek for NY Times)

Columbia University removed “pretty significant” slave owner Samuel Bard’s name from Bard Hall, with a promise to rename the building in the fall. (Amanda Rosa for NY Times)

Why was a statue of Christopher Columbus and the green space surrounding it in the Bronx’s Little Italy locked up? The Parks Department says it was a staff error. The statue has been protected by the NYPD since June. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Former Queens DA hopeful Tiffany Cabán is expected to run for City Council in Astoria when Costa Constantinides’s term limit is up in 2021. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Where to eat out on Staten Island. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 24, 2020 – The “One Thing the Pandemic Can’t Stop” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The eviction moratorium is extended, teachers fight back against starting school, the city sued over indoor dining, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

Do not wait. Click here to apply for your absentee ballot today. Everyone in the city can apply.

The Times lays out why an antibody test and its results are useless if you want to know if you’ve ever had Covid-19 or if you can’t get it again. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

Here comes the fall foliage, the greatest show in New York City this fall. Also, it’s the only show in New York City this fall. Here are some spots to check out the fall foliage. (Katrina Makayan for New York Family)

Of all the things that the Covid-19 pandemic has taken away from New York, but the $2 billion AirTrain to LGA isn’t one of those things, as the FAA’s draft Environmental Impact Study concludes it “best meets the stated Purpose and Need.” (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Even Governor Cuomo wouldn’t give an answer when asked if he has school-age kids if he would send them back to NYC schools. Classes start on September 10. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Last week teachers rallied at Grand Army Plaza against reopening the city’s schools, citing unsafe conditions, a lack of a comprehensive testing program, and decades of neglect of the buildings themselves. (Emily Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Can the city force teachers back into classrooms if teachers feel the classrooms are unsafe? The teacher’s union has begun gauging support for a strike over school reopening plans. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The subways will continue to stay shut down overnight, but the MTA is ending its program that gave free cab rides to stranded late-night essential workers. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Steiner Studios announced plans to build a 500,000-square-foot production facility on the waterfront in Sunset Park (less than a mile south of Industry City). This is a part of the city’s “Made in NY Campus,” which the mayor announced in his last “State of the City” speech, which is supposed to offer “more attractive rents than private property owners.” The city is contributing $15 million to construction costs. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

The ACLU has released data on complaints against over 81,000 current or former NYPD officers after the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the stay which blocked them from releasing the information. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database. (New York Civil Liberties Union)

It’s been four months since Francisco Garcia, an officer with a history of misconduct complaints and lawsuits and was caught on video beating a bystander and kneeling on his head while “enforcing” social distancing on the Lower East Side. It was one of the early indications that the NYPD would treat social distance enforcement like Stop And Frisk. According to the NYPD, the disciplinary process is “ongoing.” (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A look at Crocheron Park in Bayside. At a time when the city’s parks have never been more valuable, Crocheron Park has never looked worse. (Queens Crap)

The Brooklyn Museum will reopen to the public on September 12 and the Brooklyn Aquarium will be reopening on August 27. Like everything else in life in 2020, there will be new restrictions. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

All New York evictions are suspended until October 1 thanks to a ruling from the Office of Court Administration. Advocates are calling for an indefinite moratorium and landlords’ attorneys want to start evicting people yesterday. (Isaac Scher for Bushwick Daily)

As more and more types of businesses reopen, Coney Island is left behind. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

It’s hard not to make the NYU-Fyre Fest comparison with students sharing what the “meals” the school has served them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A lawsuit against New York’s statewide plastic bag ban was struck down by the state Supreme Court. The Bodega Association and plastic bag manufacturers brought the lawsuit. Nice to see this finally come to an end (for now). (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Following the city’s July 4th celebration, the de Blasio administration is working with Macy’s to ruin the Thanksgiving day Parade in similar fashion. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city has no plans to reinstate indoor dining and 100 restauranteurs announced plans to sue the city to allow indoor dining in a reduced capacity. Outdoor dining is set to expire for the year on October 31. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Following Governor Cuomo’s “alcohol must be ordered with a substantial amount of food” is having an effect, causing the closure of the cocktail bar Mister Paradise in the East Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The State Liquor Authority has banned any advertised or ticketed music, karaoke, or other forms of live entertainment at bars and restaurants. This one is personal for me. I have been hosting socially distanced trivia since the start of July in an outdoor venue where every rule the state has implemented was strictly followed. It was free to attend, but we advertised it regularly. Is trivia entertainment? Depends on who you ask, but as of now, we have to stop. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has spoken about this coming winter. “Snowfall will be greater than normal in the Northeast.” Go to hell, Old Farmer’s Almanac. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The New York Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit challenging the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, a multi-year effort to overhaul a stretch of the Lower East Side’s shore to protect the area from future flooding and storms. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

There will be a TONY award ceremony for the abbreviated 2019-2020 season. The show will take place this fall and it will be, of course, virtual. Broadway is currently closed through January 3, 2021, at the earliest. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Streetsblog asks a solid question: Why the hell are the double-decker tour buses still operating around the city? (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

11 inexpensive Times Square restaurants for takeout and outdoor dining. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)