The Briefly for October 16 – 17, 2020 – The “Greatest Mystery of 2020” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: NYPD’s Chief of Patrol resigns, the new rules for outdoor dining, how to negotiate rent, all the mayoral candidates dunk on de Blasio & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Rain throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 48˚ High: 62˚

Video: Watch the congressional debate between Congressmember Max Rose and NY Assemblyperson Nicole Malliotakis. Vote for Max Rose. (NY1)

“Time and time again, Trump-loving State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis has used votes and influence as an elected official to fight against efforts to improve LGBTQ rights — and there’s a chance she could bring her bigoted politics to the national stage.”
-Matt Tracy, Nicole Malliotakis’ Dismal Record on LGBTQ Issues for Gay City News

Farewell to Dangerfield’s on the Upper East Side, which was forced to close after 50 years. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

This is, and I can’t understate this enough, the greatest mystery of the year. (EV Grieve)

City civilian inspectors gave out 1,095 Covid-19 safety measure violations to 247 spots between Sept. 29 and Oct. 13, according to Mayor de Blasio’s office. The biggest offense? Lack of cleaning log. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Another fight in the endless battle between Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio: if yeshivas can decide they’re “childcare centers to skirt the state’s red zone rules. Cuomo says no, of course, the mayor disagrees. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo has gone as far as saying that he’ll revoke funding from non-compliant yeshivas, threatening to “withhold funding until the matter is resolved to our satisfaction.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

52% of the city’s public school students are enrolled in remote learning. That’s a 2% increase from last week. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Juneteenth is now an official public holiday in New York State. Governor Cuomo signed it into legislation this week, beating Mayor de Blasio to the punch, who claimed he would make it a holiday in the city by 2021. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

Apartment Porn: A $6.25 million Brooklyn Heightsfive-bedroom townhouse with a velour reading nook, a backyard, and lots of color. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The NYPD is preparing for election protests according to a new memo issued by Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Attorney General Letitia James is recommending that the NYPD be removed from conducting traffic stops after the fatal shooting of Allan Feliz, whom cops killed during a so-called routine traffic stop in the Bronx last year. Her recommendation is to shift to automated enforcement and redesigning roads to make it harder to speed and break traffic rules. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The New York Philharmonic canceled all of its performances through June 2021. This is an extension of their previous cancelation that was scheduled to end January 5. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

A statue of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is coming to Downtown Brooklyn’s City Point in 2021. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Speaking of statues, check out the new sculpture of Medusa holding the decapitated of Perseus that is now outside the New York County Criminal Courthouse on Centre Street. The sculpture was created by artist Luciano Garbati. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city has new rules for outdoor dining this winter that will allow for electric heaters, natural gas heaters, and propane heaters. Maybe it’s time to invest in some “restaurant blankets.” (Will Gleason for Time Out)

For now, here’s a list of restaurants with outdoor heating lamps. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Grand Central is looking to alter its rent agreement with its tenants, with the MTA will take a percentage of rent from the restaurants and other small businesses based on gross revenue. Apple won’t be getting a break, just the smaller businesses. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

No need to panic (yet), but State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said that without federal aid, we’re looking at “the end of regional public transit as we have known it.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

What we’re talking about when we say tax the rich. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

“After hearing that I would be kicked out of the Lucerne, I felt traumatized – dehumanized at the thought of being moved from shelter to shelter like a pawn on a chessboard during a global pandemic. The words of the mayor brought back thoughts of traumatic experiences from my past, as a young child growing up in New York City’s foster care system.”
-Shams DaBaron, City’s Move to Vacate UWS Hotel Shelter is Adding ‘Trauma on Top of Trauma,’ Resident Says for City Limits

How to negotiate rent on a city apartment. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

In May, Mayor de Blasio assembled a Surface Transportation Advisory Council to provide suggestions to keep people safe as the city reopens. The mayor has ignored all of their recommendations has not responded to their open letter written on September 1. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s five head “neighborhood policing” effort has done little to slow crime or eliminate racial bias in who gets charged, according to a new study. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

With less than a year in the position, NYPD Chief of Patrol Fausto Pichardo decided to reture. Reports say that he was a “leave the NYPD alone” guy and “always hated the mayor.” (Jake Offenhartz, Jen Chung, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has denied there was “friction” between him and Pichardo, so you there was friction. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Gallery: The spooky homes of NYC. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Maybe we all need to embrace this makeshift shrine to Mercury that was left at the Utica Ave A/C stop. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here are the 2020 Tony Award nominees. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The first virtual mayoral forum featuring seven potential mayoral candidates was held this week and there was one thing they all had in common. No one likes the mayor. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The 10 best bánh mì in the city. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 4-5 2020 – The “Is It Finally Time To Find A New Apartment?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The mayor is robbing the city to pay for his ferries, delivering comforting words with your pizza, Hillary Clinton talks art, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 67˚
Clear throughout the day.

Have you been seeing comedy shows popping up in unconventional places? Well, it’s because comedy is technically illegal anywhere food and drinks are sold. (Sasha von Olderhausen)

The $100 million cut to the Sanitation department seems to have hit the Bronx the hardest. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Is this a good time to find a new apartment? (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Yeah, rents might be seeing a temporary drop, but it seems like New York City is still on its way to having the highest rent in the country. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A Human Rights Watch report called the NYPD’s actions against protesters on June 4 in Mott Haven “intentional, planned, and unjustified.” The mayor continues to defend the NYPD’s actions, but finally admitted the NYPD’s targeting and assault of legal observers was wrong. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayorally controlled city Economic Development Corporation diverted tens of millions of dollars in rent receipts from publicly owned Times Square real estate holdings to help operate the costly NYC Ferry system. In the middle of a pandemic and budget crisis, maybe it’s not the best time to steal from the city to pay for Mayor de Blasio’s pet projects. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The MTA honored Medgar Evers by renaming the Franklin Ave and President St stations after the civil rights icon and the college that bears his name. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s been enough happening this week before Rock Moranis was randomly punched in the head by a random attacker on Friday morning. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

If you need some comforting words, try ordering from Vinnie’s. In addition to your pizza you can get comforting words for $1. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

The house where Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny was written in is in Greenwich Village. On March 5, 1967, it was put on a flatbed truck on the Upper East Side and moved to where it sits today. (Sydney Rose for Atlas Obscura)

The MTA is getting some work done ahead of schedule at the Sutphin Blvd.-Archer Ave E train station, taking advantage of the moment’s low ridership. The work will conclude by November 2. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

“The local government’s responsibility is to enforce the law.” – Governor Cuomo is making more threats towards the city, this time accompanied by a $10,000 daily fine for lack of enforcement. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Add the nearly 70-year-old Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side to the list of restaurants that have closed in the pandemic. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Things are awful. It’s okay to talk about art sometimes. Here’s an interview with Hillary Clinton about her love of Broadway. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A guide to better understanding the city’s Covid-19 data. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Something strange is happening in Boro Park when it comes to Covid-19. Anonymous Yiddish robocalls are targeting Boro Park and Williamsburg urging people against getting tested “as this drives up the numbers,” in the Bobov Hasidic community, leaders are encouraging anyone who already had the virus to get tested to also drive the numbers down, and there are reports that some providers are withholding reporting test results. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alright, it’s currently flu season and it’s been Covid-19 season since February. Here’s how to identify different symptoms of either. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

The biryani delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

This story is about how the governor sent Trump a “recovery basket” of buffalo wings, bagels, and cheesecake, but also did you know that Cuomo declared the official state snack to be Greek yogurt in 2014? (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Holy shit, Cellino & Barnes’ Steve Barnes died in a plane crash. (Juliana Kim for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s Third Avenue claimed another life as a bicyclist was hit and killed by a motorcyclist on Saturday morning. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Staten Island to NYC regarding budget woes: “Don’t tread on me.” (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

“The time to address this challenge is now – before the area’s growth and changes cause even more displacement. Industry City will grow and change even without their proposed rezoning. The campus will continue to attract more jobs and more residents. We cannot pretend these changes aren’t occurring. Sunset Park must vigorously preserve the affordable units it has, better protect tenants and begin to support development without displacement that creates truly and permanently affordable housing.”
-Michelle de la Uz, Executive Director of Fifth Avenue Committee & Neighbors Helping Neighbors, Industry City is dead, but Sunset Park still needs help for amNewYork Metro

NYC has a corn maze. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Zoo’s holiday light show is returning this November for something to do outdoors while we’re still locked indoors. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Everything is canceled, so here are 8 places to personally celebrate Oktoberfest. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Sarah for today’s featured photo from the Staten Island side of the Verrazzano.

The Briefly for June 22, 2020 – The “An Answer to Our Collective Fireworks Question” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC starts reopening phase two, Tuesday is primary day, the only true New Yorker, an NYPD cop uses an illegal chokehold, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

A boy caught a 20-pound catfish in Central Park using a bagel as bait. When we have conversations about who is a “real” New Yorker, this catfish deserves to be a part of the conversation. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Tuesday is a 2020 primary in New York for much more than the Democratic presidential nominee. Here’s your guide to the local races. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you applied for an absentee ballot and it hasn’t arrived, here’s what to do. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

This weekend was the breaking point based on everyone in the city going to Twitter to complain about fireworks. Firework complaints are up 230x in June. What the hell is going on? (Sydney Pereira, Beth Fertig, David Cruz, Jake Dobkin, and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there’s a real answer to what the hell is going on. According to Dave Hill, all of the fireworks shows in the Northeast have been canceled and fireworks vendors are up to their ears in pro-grade fireworks. Thanks to supply and demand, dealers have turned to the black market and are trying to unload their fireworks for any price. (@DaveHill77)

“Everywhere I go it smells the same, and it smells like my breath.” Let’s check-in with David Sedaris. (Sarah Lyall for NY Times)

A guide to phase two’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Phase two means something big: Offices are open once more. If companies decide to reopen their offices? That’s a different story. (Michael Gold and Troy Closson for NY Times)

A 1.9-acre waterfront park and small beach is coming to the Bushwick Inlet Park, which was approved by the Parks and Waterfront Committee of Brooklyn’s Community Board 1. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a piece of history off the beaten path? Check out Jackie Robinson’s house on Tilden Ave. (Untapped New York for Michelle Young)

After 96 days, Governor Cuomo’s daily press conferences have come to an end. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Half of New York’s working-class immigrants have lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study by the Center for Urban Future. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

How many days has it been since the passing of the Eric Garner Chokehold Ban? An NYPD officer was suspended without pay after being caught on video using an illegal chokehold on an unarmed Black man in Queens. (Mark Hallum and Zach Gewelb for amNewYork Metro)

86.4% of tickets for biking on the sidewalk in 2018 and 2019 went to Black and Hispanic New Yorkers, even though they comprise only 49 percent of cyclists. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Dominique Alexander was found hanging from a tree last week in Fort Tryon Park in Manhattan, his death was ruled a suicide. Alexander’s death is one of many deaths of Black men that have been ruled a suicide after being found hanging from trees. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There were reports of three nooses being hung in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx on Juneteenth. The NYPD declined to open an investigation, claiming the ropes were nothing more than harmless string. This is the second investigation into a noose left in a city park that the NYPD has refused or closed without a thorough investigation. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Vincent D’Andraia, the cop that was suspended for showing a protester to the ground and was charged with misdemeanor assault has a history of 11 allegations of misconduct since 2015. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Students at predominantly Black New York City schools are significantly less likely to have a positive view of school police or to believe school discipline is applied fairly. If that’s your assumption, there’s a new study that confirms your assumption. (Jessica Gould, Alex Zimmerman, and Gabrielle LaMarr LeMee and Gothamist)

New York City’s education oversight board is calling for public schools, not the police, to manage the officers stationed on city campuses. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

“The Case for Self-Enforcing Streets” from Transportation Alternatives argues that the NYPD should be removed from traffic enforcement, calling for an expansion in enforcement technology, changing how crash investigations work, and more. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Hundreds of protesters marched on Astoria Blvd in Queens demanding the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The American Museum of Natural History expressed plans to have the statue of Theodore Roosevelt removed from its entrance on Central Park West for its racist depictions of Native American and African figures. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

While we’re talking about statues, let’s encourage the Long Island town of Babylon to tear down their statue of Robert Moses. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

“Mayor de Blasio could have acted all along. He could have called for the NYPD to make officers’ disciplinary records public. He could have fired Officer Pantaleo immediately after he murdered Eric Garner. Mayor de Blasio knows how this all works, but benefits from the opaqueness that characterizes the political system in this city and state. He has amplified the problem with the system.”
-New Kings Democrats, Mayor de Blasio is neither progressive nor effective. He needs to resign

Juneteenth will become a city holiday in 2021. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Photos: Juneteenth celebrations across the city. (Sophia Chang, photos by Angela Chalmondeley, Khaleeq Alfred, and Gretchen Robinette for Gothamist)

NYC Parks installed “Juneteenth Grove” at Cadman Plaza Park “in celebration of Juneteenth and to celebrate the homegoing of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and countless others.” (Mary Kim for Brooklyn Heights Blog)

Downtown Brooklyn and Park Slope are getting new bike lanes this summer on Smith St, Fourth Ave, and Navy Street. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Another week and another local racist caught on camera. This time it was in Flushing Queens where a man with a face mask pulled down yelled slurs at a South Korean student inside a 7-Eleven. The NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s been 63 years since the legendary brawl at the Copacabana that involved six hall of fame Yankees and their wives while celebrating Billy Martin’s birthday. Finally, the truth has come out. (David Margolick for NY Times)

The Yankees and Mets have announced that their, uh, “spring” training will be happening in New York and not Florida. (Priscila Korb for Patch)

Is wearing a mask getting in your way of drinking? Check out Crook & Marker’s TasteMask, which includes a flap for a straw. (Bao Ong for The Out)

Thanks to reader Hannah for today’s featured photo!