The Briefly for May 22, 2020 – The “The Beaches Will Be Open This Weekend” Memorial Day Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A new plan for Long Island City, a threat to SantaCon, Scarr’s Pizza and McSorley return, late-night fireworks, restaurant reopenings to celebrate, and more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 69˚
Possible drizzle in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 65˚

Do you have blood? Can you spare some? The city’s blood supply is running “dangerously low.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What are you doing to experience new things while staying at home? SNL’s Heidi Gardner is trying a new cereal each week. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

If the ban on city dwellers continues, City Council Member Keith Powers has threatened to cancel SantaCon and ban Long Islanders from St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Please? Will you promise? (Adam Nichols for Patch)

After a week of back and forth, the city’s beaches will be open this weekend, but with no lifeguards and swimming won’t be allowed. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Nathan’s is the biggest game in Coney Island hot dogs right now, but they got there by playing dirty. Coney Island’s original hot dogger is Feltman’s. (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

McSorley’s is back after its longest closure since opening in 1854. (EV Grieve)

Scarr’s Pizza is back too. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Archdiocese of NY shared a “Faith Forward” plan, which outlines a five-step plan to reopen New York’s churches. (Ron Lee for NY1)

Religious institutions can begin holding services, assuming they limit occupancy to ten or fewer people indoors, everyone must wear a mask and follow social distancing protocols. (NY1)

Some suggested Memorial Day reading, care of the city’s independent book shops. (Danielle Valente for Time Out)

The mayor ran for office on the idea that he wanted to bridge the gap between the two New York Cities, but if you look at the neighborhoods that have received open streets and those that have not, he’s continuing in the tradition he rallied against by denying some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods by the Covid-19 virus open spaces. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

State Assemblymember Carmen Arroyo has been removed from the Democratic primary ballot after being caught altering signatures and dates on her petition to remain on the ballot. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Central Park Park Ranger Ashley Whited rescued a team of orphaned ducks after a snapping turtle attacked and killed their mother. (Anthony Pascale for NY1)

The pandemic has shown what has always been possible, including to-go drinks from bars and restaurants. State Senator Brad Hoylman introduced legislation that would allow bars and restaurants to sell to-go drinks for two years after the pandemic is over. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

This weekend kicks off the Loisaida Festival, digitally of course. (EV Grieve)

Here’s the latest plan from a giant developer for the “future” of Long Island City, leaning heavily on commercial property, with 10-to-12 million square feet of space on 28 acres of land surrounding the area that Amazon HQ2 never was. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Big companies like Facebook and Mastercard are rethinking massive leases in Manhattan after allowing employees to work remotely on an ongoing basis. Facebook is or was close to signing a lease int he Farley Post Office building next to Penn Station, so it remains to be seen if they’ll go through with the deal. I guess you could say it’s complicated 🥴. (Danielle Balbi for The Real Deal)

Video: Climbing to the top of the Woolworth Building, in what appears to be less than legal means. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The mayor says the city could be on its way to start phase one of reopening in the first half of June. This is, of course, not a guarantee, and we’ll have to see how well the city fares during this holiday weekend as temperatures are looking favorable. One spike and we ain’t opening in June. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

I don’t know if it’s welcome news, but it’s a step towards normalcy. Beginning on Monday, you can file lawsuits electronically for the first time in multiple weeks. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

A guide to New York’s contact tracing programs. (Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

With the rise of MIS-C cases in the state, Governor Cuomo hasn’t made a decision about summer camps across the state, but it’s looking less likely. (Zack Fink for NY1)

176,000 students will be attending summer school, but it won’t be in person. The governor canceled in-person summer classes. The governor went as far as to say that it’s in question if schools will reopen in the fall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved an $8 million project to install a new pedestrian plaza beneath Brooklyn Bridge Park, which will replace a fenced-in parking lot, which is there today. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What is New York without New York bars? (Megan Abbott for NY Times)

Ridership is on an uptick, so the Staten Island ferry will increase its rush-hour service. (NY1)

Fleet Week is still happening… virtually? (Ron Lee for NY1)

15 restaurants and bars that have permanently closed because of the coronavirus. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This shouldn’t be a surprise, but that all-male restaurant panel the president has convened, which called him “one of us,” ain’t gonna help. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here are the CDC’s guidance on using cloth face coverings. (Norwood News)

Is this NYC’s oldest manhole cover? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

* Seinfeld voice* What’s the deal with all these late-night fireworks? (David Cruz for Gothamist)

8 restaurant reopenings to be excited about this week. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Thank you to reader Shiloh for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 2, 2020 – The “De Blasio Argues $30 Pizza, Not the $51 Billion MTA Plan” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 2020’s new laws, a tribute to Tom’s Restaurant, the MTA embrace’s “Train Daddy” Andy Byford, Prohibition Bakery closes, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 47˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Photos: Times Square celebrates the coming of a new decade. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Why does anyone camp out all day in Times Square to watch the ball drop? Here are some answers. (Jen Chung, who got the Times Square assignment, for Gothamist)

Photos: Cleaning up Times Square. (Ben Yakas, Gretchen Robinette for Gothamist)

A full 2020 calendar of meteor showers, supermoons and lunar events you can see from the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Welcome to Little Aidan Zobnin and Anthony Saraceno Jr., New York City’s midnight babies for 2020. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork)

Election Day. When is the NYC Marathon? When does the U.S. Open start? Comic Con is what days? A look ahead at major events in the city for 2020. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork)

Five laws that will hit the city in 2020: the plastic bag ban, $15 minimum wage for all, cash bail, the end of pot testing, and pre-registering to vote for teens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

More new laws coming this year: Discovery reform and the end of “blindfold laws,” insurance companies will be required to cover in vitro-fertilization and adoptees can access their birth certificates after turning 18. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

“Another Tech Guy Tries to Disrupt Food Space” and other predicted 2020 headlines from Eater’s peanut gallery. (Eater)

Clamoring for more holiday cheer? A list of the best holiday pop-up bars in NYC. Most are open this weekend. (Bao Ong with Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Is one of your 2020 resolutions to get more civically involved? Here’s how to join your community board. (Curbed)

Mayor de Blasio has the opportunity to directly influence the MTA’s $51 billion capital plan for 2020-2024, but he is declining to be directly involved. Everyone else with appointment power for the review board has named themselves at the governor’s request. Thanks for stepping up and representing the city Mr. Mayor. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

The mayor doesn’t want to get involved in the MTA’s capital plan, he’ll get involved in trying to shame Domino’s for selling $30 pizzas in Times Square on New Year’s Eve. The mayor, never one to have a connection with the city he’s supposed to be in charge of, seems to forget that most pizzas in Times Square, albeit not from Domino’s, costs around $30. (Lee Moran for HuffPost)

An illustrated tribute to Tom’s Diner in Prospect Heights. (Jessica Olien for NY Times)

Even the MTA has begun using the nickname Train Daddy for President Andy Byford. (@nyctsubway)

Photos: The 2020 Coney Island New Year’s Day Polar Bear Plunge. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Video: Take a walk from Brooklyn Bridge Park to Chinatown with a 360° view. (ActionKid)

Sometimes the performer on the subway is playing the didgeridoo, sometimes it’s the equivalent of a punk rock music festival. (The Villager)

Elon Musk spent last week being a genius inventor on Twitter, coming up with the idea… for the subway. What a genius! Traveling underground! (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Video: How much wind is too much? Watch a wind turbine in Co-op City fall apart under heavy winds. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

It took a death, but the Department of Buildings is doubling the size of their facade inspection team from 12 to 24. Every building in the city over six stories has to undergo a physical inspection. That still seems like it isn’t enough. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYPD’s Michael J. Reynolds, a white man, traveled to Nashville for a bachelor party and ended up kicking in a black woman’s door while drunk, threatening her and her sons with a racist slur and violence. He was sentenced to 15 days in jail and three years’ probation. There’s a petition signed by 10,000 people calling for his firing, but he’s still an officer. As a reminder, it took five years for Daniel Pantaleo to be fired. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

Northeast Queens’ biggest stories to watch in 2020. (Jenna Bagcal for QNS)

Nightmare: A 36-year-old fell 15 feet off the roof of a building on Mott Street and was trapped between two buildings. She was rescued from between the buildings and her name has not been released. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Prohibition Bakery, the boozy bakery in the basement of Subject Bar on Suffolk St, closed on Christmas Day. It’s a different story than most closings, instead of rent it was “an enormous drain of time and energy, and frankly had stopped bringing me any real happiness.” (Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

Having defeated Airbnb, the Hotels Trade Council is happy to accept its role as a political heavyweight. It’s the latest focus is to convince the City Council to require hotels to acquire a special permit to essentially ban the construction of new hotels. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Republican State Assembly Minority Leader Brian Kolbys wrote an op-ed urging New Yorkers not to drink and drive. He was arrested on New Year’s Eve after crashing his car while drunk just outside of Rochester. (NY 1)

Chicken and waffles. Eggs Benedict. Meatloaf sandwich. 18 hangover-busting dishes. (Eater)

The Briefly for December 26, 2019 – The “Christmas Trees Don’t Belong on the Beach” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: When to throw out your Christmas tree, the secret economy and industry of five cent deposits, Cuomo’s feud with Trump heats up over weddings, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 45˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look back at the City Hall Christmas tree lighting, a bygone NYC tradition. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas has an 88-year history. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Video: The inspiring story of Sydney Mesher, the first Rockette with a visible disability. (The Rockettes)

Videos and Photos: The Saks Fifth Avenue Frozen 2 holiday lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

How long should you keep your Christmas tree up? At least until January 6, because that’s the first day of the Department of Sanitation’s tree disposal. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

Video: No matter what you read on Facebook, don’t leave your old Christmas tree at the beach. (Anginas Gonzalez for NY1)

Tompkins Square Park has some new trees. (EV Grieve)

Governor Cuomo vetoed a bill that would have allowed federal judges, Trump’s judges, to officiate weddings in New York state. I guess federal judges will have to become online ministers if they want to officiate weddings, just like the rest of us. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The fascinating history of 28 Old Fulton St, from old Dutch farmland to Revolutionary War battle site, from the Eagle pressroom to a warehouse for silver, furniture and then electoral ballots, to its latest use as luxury apartments. (Chase DiBenedetto for Bedford + Bowery)

Years ago two toy stores within a few blocks of each other would be at war around the holidays, but in 2019 Stationary and Toy World and West Side Kids in the Upper West Side are joining forces to fight back against online shopping. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: Got $75,000 lying around? You can afford one night at the Mark Hotel. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

With the mayor's potentially illegal "horse trading" collusion with ultra-Orthodox state lawmakers surrounding a Department of Education report about the quality of education at the city's yeshivas, advocates are calling for accountability. The city has made no indication of punishment for the 26 of 28 failing schools, instead requiring "timelines for improvement" by January 15 with no information about if schools fail to meet the deadline. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A state Supreme Court judge has struck down an upcoming New York City rule that would have restricted the amount of time app-based drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft can spend cruising without passengers below 96th Street in Manhattan. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Profiles of five African-American high-profile prisoners from New York City who were convicted of violent crimes that included murder and attempted murder. All committed their first crimes as teenagers. All are now in late middle age, ranging from 48 to 61 and seeking release. A great piece from students at CUNY's Craigs Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. (Stephanie Chukwuma, Trone Dowd, Jeffery Harrell, Brenda León, Hannah Miller, Rosemary Misdary, Rachel Rippetoe, Maria Robins-Somerville, Sean Sanders, and Annie Todd for Gothamist)

8 cultural attractions to visit on NYC’s Museum Mile. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

StreetEasy and Douglas Elliman appear to be ready to lock horns. While the details aren’t exciting, it could portend a coming fracturing of real estate listings. (E. B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

A train delay because of a pencil. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A Bronx police officer is facing accusations of groping a 14-year-old teenager while she was handcuffed in the back of a squad car last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Christmas is gone. No literally, Christmas is literally buried in Green-Wood Cemetery. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

The city doesn’t just get rid of its useless junk, it auctions it off. (Winnie Hu and James Sprankle for NY Times)

What’s the opposite of a Christmas miracle? Ask the 1,000 residents in NYCHA housing in Coney Island who woke up with no heat or hot water on Christmas. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

As of this week, bicyclists can use the walk/won’t walk indicators rather than the lights are use. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The latest in the seemingly never-ending battle of Industry City’s rezoning is that things are looking bleak for Industry City after the city is refusing to provide funds for new schools, housing and tenant programs to benefit the neighborhood. The decision to move forward rests with City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, who has been skeptical of the process since the start. It would be unheard of for the city to commit funds for a private application, Menchaca is justifying the request based on how dramatically the rezoning would change Sunset Park. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Has Midtown South become more pleasant for residents in the last few years? Finally, an answer to the eternal question of “who lives here?” (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

There is an entire underground economy centered around plastic bottle and metal can deposits, where the world turns five cents at a time. It’s all in a legal gray area that the city turns a blind eye towards, but once you have an understanding of how the canner economy works, you can understand why there is opposition to expanding the five cent deposit program. (Andy Newman for NY Times)

After eating at 300 restaurants this year, Scott Lynch picks his 16 best bites of 2019. (Scott Lynch for Eater)