The Briefly for December 26, 2019 – The “Christmas Trees Don’t Belong on the Beach” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: When to throw out your Christmas tree, the secret economy and industry of five cent deposits, Cuomo’s feud with Trump heats up over weddings, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 45˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look back at the City Hall Christmas tree lighting, a bygone NYC tradition. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas has an 88-year history. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Video: The inspiring story of Sydney Mesher, the first Rockette with a visible disability. (The Rockettes)

Videos and Photos: The Saks Fifth Avenue Frozen 2 holiday lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

How long should you keep your Christmas tree up? At least until January 6, because that’s the first day of the Department of Sanitation’s tree disposal. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

Video: No matter what you read on Facebook, don’t leave your old Christmas tree at the beach. (Anginas Gonzalez for NY1)

Tompkins Square Park has some new trees. (EV Grieve)

Governor Cuomo vetoed a bill that would have allowed federal judges, Trump’s judges, to officiate weddings in New York state. I guess federal judges will have to become online ministers if they want to officiate weddings, just like the rest of us. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The fascinating history of 28 Old Fulton St, from old Dutch farmland to Revolutionary War battle site, from the Eagle pressroom to a warehouse for silver, furniture and then electoral ballots, to its latest use as luxury apartments. (Chase DiBenedetto for Bedford + Bowery)

Years ago two toy stores within a few blocks of each other would be at war around the holidays, but in 2019 Stationary and Toy World and West Side Kids in the Upper West Side are joining forces to fight back against online shopping. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: Got $75,000 lying around? You can afford one night at the Mark Hotel. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

With the mayor's potentially illegal "horse trading" collusion with ultra-Orthodox state lawmakers surrounding a Department of Education report about the quality of education at the city's yeshivas, advocates are calling for accountability. The city has made no indication of punishment for the 26 of 28 failing schools, instead requiring "timelines for improvement" by January 15 with no information about if schools fail to meet the deadline. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A state Supreme Court judge has struck down an upcoming New York City rule that would have restricted the amount of time app-based drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft can spend cruising without passengers below 96th Street in Manhattan. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Profiles of five African-American high-profile prisoners from New York City who were convicted of violent crimes that included murder and attempted murder. All committed their first crimes as teenagers. All are now in late middle age, ranging from 48 to 61 and seeking release. A great piece from students at CUNY's Craigs Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. (Stephanie Chukwuma, Trone Dowd, Jeffery Harrell, Brenda León, Hannah Miller, Rosemary Misdary, Rachel Rippetoe, Maria Robins-Somerville, Sean Sanders, and Annie Todd for Gothamist)

8 cultural attractions to visit on NYC’s Museum Mile. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

StreetEasy and Douglas Elliman appear to be ready to lock horns. While the details aren’t exciting, it could portend a coming fracturing of real estate listings. (E. B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

A train delay because of a pencil. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A Bronx police officer is facing accusations of groping a 14-year-old teenager while she was handcuffed in the back of a squad car last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Christmas is gone. No literally, Christmas is literally buried in Green-Wood Cemetery. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

The city doesn’t just get rid of its useless junk, it auctions it off. (Winnie Hu and James Sprankle for NY Times)

What’s the opposite of a Christmas miracle? Ask the 1,000 residents in NYCHA housing in Coney Island who woke up with no heat or hot water on Christmas. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

As of this week, bicyclists can use the walk/won’t walk indicators rather than the lights are use. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The latest in the seemingly never-ending battle of Industry City’s rezoning is that things are looking bleak for Industry City after the city is refusing to provide funds for new schools, housing and tenant programs to benefit the neighborhood. The decision to move forward rests with City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, who has been skeptical of the process since the start. It would be unheard of for the city to commit funds for a private application, Menchaca is justifying the request based on how dramatically the rezoning would change Sunset Park. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Has Midtown South become more pleasant for residents in the last few years? Finally, an answer to the eternal question of “who lives here?” (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

There is an entire underground economy centered around plastic bottle and metal can deposits, where the world turns five cents at a time. It’s all in a legal gray area that the city turns a blind eye towards, but once you have an understanding of how the canner economy works, you can understand why there is opposition to expanding the five cent deposit program. (Andy Newman for NY Times)

After eating at 300 restaurants this year, Scott Lynch picks his 16 best bites of 2019. (Scott Lynch for Eater)

The Briefly for December 10, 2019 – The “MTA Gets A Taste Of Their Own Medication” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC will pause sending its homeless to the slums on Newark, de Blasio’s paid vacation bill is stalled in the City Council, the best dishes, and more

Beetlejuice needs a new home on Broadway. It’s being evicted from the Winter Garden Theater on June 6 to make way for “The Music Man” starring Hugh Jackman. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Holiday windows you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Con Ed, who had a banner summer in New York, is raising its rates in 2020, 2021, and 2022. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The MTA spent $600 million on 300 subway cars and only 18 arrived on time. These are the same trains that are less reliable than ones 30 years old. So not only are they providing poor service, but they’re also regularly late. Who does that sound like? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re the kind of person who goes out of your way to avoid hearing anyone singing Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas is You,” you you’ll want to avoid the Mariah Carey Christmas pop-up shop this weekend. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The city will suspend its program sending homeless New Yorkers to slums and condemned apartment buildings in Newark after the city of Newark filed a lawsuit in an attempt to stop the practice. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Fire up your Instagram account, the Museum of Ice Cream is back. (Lorence Fabricant for NY Times)

Imagine the kind of SantaCon-inspired event that even the SantaCon NYC organizers feel the need to distance themselves from. Welcome to SantaCon Hoboken. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York’s most iconic Art Deco buildings, mapped. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

The mayor has tried to push his paid vacation legislation through the City Council, but despite his announcement that the city would pass it this year, it appears to be stuck in limbo with opposition from small businesses and Speaker Corey Johnson. Maybe if he spent more time being the mayor and less cosplaying as a presidential candidate there would have been a chance. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The man who ate the $120,000 banana at Art Basel Miami Beach is Brooklyn artist David Datuna. He was not arrested for eating the banana. (Maya Kaufman and Staff for Patch)

If you’re craving more banana and duct tape art, street artist Joseph Grazi spent his weekend “creating” new works near the Essex Street Market. (Bowery Boogie)

Photos: Inside the former Coffee Shop in Union Square-turned-Chase bank. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Nightmare: Two women fell between subway cars and the train started moving at Broadway Junction shortly after midnight on Sunday. One woman died and the other is in stable position. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

7 enormous unfinished NYC infrastructure projects poised to change the city in the 2020s. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Mapping the tech takeover of New York City. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Working in an Amazon warehouse is more dangerous than working in a coal mine, and 42 members of the City Council, State Senate and Assembly are demanding safety improvements in the Staten Island warehouse. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Infatuation’s favorite new dishes of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 19, 2019 – The “Is The Rent Finally Too Damn High?” Edition

No one buys Bloomberg’s remorse, the opening of the new Milk Bar, Midtown BINGO, what to do if you find a coyote in Central Park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A Midtown BINGO card, to make going to Midtown only slightly less terrible. (Gothamist)

There are signs that, to quote Jimmy McMillan, “the rent is too damn high.” The volume of apartments for rent has increased for the fourth month in a row, raising the vacancy rate across the city. (amNewYork)

Got 100 years? That’s all it’ll take the average New Yorker to save up enough money to buy a home here. (Patch)

Chef Amanda Cohen, best known for Dirt Candy on the LES, is unveiling Lekka, a new restaurant. The main event is a new veggie burger. The entire restaurant, including the name, has a South African influence. Lekka opens today. (Grub Street)

The globes on the Manhattan Bridge are coming back as part of a $75.9 million rehabilitation of the bridge. (Untapped New York)

Video: One of the three new Staten Island ferries getting launched into the water. The first is expected in the city in August. (Untapped New York)

The MTA is not known for being gentle, and their work in the 86th Street R station in Bay Ridge is no exception. Renovations have damaged the station’s historic tile work, which dates back over a century. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Martin McDonagh’s dark drama about a British executioner “Hangmen” is coming to Broadway with previews in February. “Hangmen” won the Olivier Award for best new play in 2016 in London. (NY Times)

No one is buying Michael Bloomberg’s “remorse” over stop-and-frisk. (The Root)

Holiday pop-up bar season has come for us all. (Eater)

Here come the holiday markets. (6sqft)

There’s a parent-led concerted effort going on in District 15 to integrate their middle schools and the results are encouraging. District 15 covers Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Sunset Park, Cobble Hill and Windsor Terrace. (Gothamist)

Don’t believe the NY Post when it comes to the city’s supervised release program. Despite the headlines, the city doesn’t give everyone “gift cards, cell phones, and Mets tickets.” The supervised release program is in place to help ensure people make their court dates, and appearances have held steady at 88% when intake has increased over 50%. Pretty good track record. (Gothamist)

The Playboy Club is dead and changing into the Live Nation Theater at Cachet Hotel. Turns out not many people were interested in a $100,000 membership. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The boyhood home of Donald Trump was for sale in an auction and no one bid on it. Maybe if everyone puts in money we can buy it and throw a sledgehammer party to demolish it. (6sqft)

In tribute to the Diamond District, which sits on W 47th between Fifth and Sixth, “one of the last New York blocks left in Manhattan.” (Gothamist)

After being pressured to leave Bed-Stuy, Charlotte Taillor’s BDSM Collective and Domination School Taillor Group has settled into their home in Bushwick to host kink/BDSM workshops, self-defense classes, and private sessions, all of it legal. (Bushwick Daily)

Photos: Opening day at the new flagship Milk Bar, including the “neon hallway.” (Gothamist)

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams told the City Council’s Public Safety Committee Monday that they should pass a bill mandating the public release of NYPD body camera footage. (amNewYork)

Esquire’s list of the best new restaurants in America for 2019 is out and it includes NYC’s Rezdôra, Kawi, Oddo, Wayan, and Red Hook Tavern. (Patch)

The city is making a big push to offer services to the homeless in Outreach NYC, but the program is being met with skepticism. Yes, the outreach is improving, but the shelter system itself still has all of its own problems. (Gothamist)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden unveiled its new Robert W. Wilson Overlook, which gives viewers a sweeping view of the Cherry Esplanade. (Curbed)

There have been more and more coyote sightings in Central Park. If you come across one, stay calm and try to avoid it. If it comes up to you, try to make yourself look bigger and make loud noises until it retreats. (Gothamist)

Pot arrests have dropped dramatically in the city, but the people arrested are still predominantly black and Hispanic, making up 90 percent of arrests last quarter. OF the 260 people arrested for possession, less than 20 were white. (Patch)

Ben Kallos, running for Manhattan Borough president, got a cease and desist from Marvel Comics for dressing up like Captain America in a recent political mailer. (Patch)

The death of 25-year-old Brooklynite Ola Salem, found in a wooded area of a Staten Island park, was ruled a homicide. (Gothamist)

The MTA is planning to renovate the 52nd Street, 61st Street, 69th, 82nd, 103st and 111th Street stations along the 7 line with renovations getting started in the second half of next year. (Jackson Heights Post)

The best burgers in the Upper West Side. (I Love The Upper West Side)