The Briefly for April 30, 2020 – The “I Will Report You To 311 For This!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Alternatives for grocery delivery, Governor Cuomo’s quizzical piece of art, 40 inexpensive takeout suggestions, IKEA Rego Park’s opening delayed, and more

Today – Low: 53˚ High: 57˚
Rain until morning, starting again in the evening.

Waiting for an antibody test is the new waiting for a table at brunch. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

One of Brooklyn’s best places to go for peace and quiet is now closed to the public. Floyd Bennett Field is being used to store MTA buses, cutting off access to the Gateway National Recreation Area, Floyd Bennett Gardens Association’s access to their gardens, and some of the city’s best spots for biking. (Gabriel Sandoval and Jose Martinez for The City)

Andrew Yang is suing New York state for canceling the Democratic presidential primary, trying to get it reinstated. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

“I am not happy at all, and this doesn’t have to do with what candidate you are supporting.” –AOC on the primary’s cancelation. (Juan Manuel Benitez for NY1)

Residential noise complaints to 311 have gone up by 22% during everyone’s quarantine. I’m sorry, I’m trying to perfect my tap dancing. I’ll try to keep it down. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

A look inside the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center and how it’s kept itself, and the city’s food supply chain, going during the pandemic. (Gary He for Eater)

VIDEO: “The Central Park,” a mashup of scenes from movies in or around Central Park. (Flaming Pablum)

Major League Baseball continues to think of how to play the remainder of the season, whenever that might start. The latest idea disbands the American and National Leagues in favor of three geographic-based leagues and highlights local rivalries, giving us a season’s worth of Subway Series games. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The cover of the April 15 New Yorker sums life up pretty well right now. An interview with Chris Ware about “Still Life.” (Françoise Mouly for The New Yorker)

Sara Erenthal’s work, which uses the city’s trash as a canvas for years, has been featured multiple times in The Briefly’s daily photos (including one claiming “our president is an absolute piece of shit, which I got an angry email about). Here’s an interview with Erenthal about her art and experience creating it. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A series of interviews with N.Y.U. Langone Health nurses, who bear the burden and weight of the city’s sick and dying. (David Gonzalez and Sinna Nasseri for NY Times)

“You know what it spells? It spells love.” When Governor Cuomo unveiled a wall of masks, I spent a few moments actually searching for the word “LOVE” within it. He was speaking metaphorically and I’m glad no one was around to watch me lean in and squint to try to see it. I wasn’t the only one confused. (Kathleen Culliton for

Go beyond Amazon Prime and Instacart. 10 grocery delivery services that are locally focused. (amNewYork Metro)

The funeral in Williamsburg is putting the NYPD and city officials in a tough spot. More than 2,000 Satmar Hasidic Jewish residents flooded the streets, despite an attempt to work with the NYPD to socially distance, endangering everyone involved. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea stated it bluntly: there will be “zero tolerance” for gatherings like this in the future because the crowds are “putting my cops at risk.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

“I have no regrets about calling out this danger and saying we’re going to be dealing with it very, very aggressively” -Mayor de Blasio on future enforcement of social distancing after the funeral. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

CitiBike is expanding into upper Manhattan and the Bronx starting the week of May 4 with 100 new docking stations. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A map of the Bronx’s new CitiBike locations. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city will offer COVID-19 antibody tests to 150,000 health care workers and first responders to determine whether they’ve been infected. The Department of Defense will also be setting up a program to treat health care workers for “combat stress.” Chirlane McCray is in charge of the mental health program. Hopefully, unlike her past work with ThriveNYC, this will be proven to be effective. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Throughout May, the city will transfer 1,000 New Yorkers living in city homeless shelters every week to vacant hotel rooms, according to the mayor. The city has approximately 30,000 empty hotel rooms. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The YMCA launched YMCA @ Home, free workout classes. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is offering 200 exhibition catalogs from its archives for free, dating back to 1936. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Last weekend you baked Junior’s cheesecake, this weekend are you ready for another challenge? Here’s the recipe for Magnolia Bakery’s iconic cupcakes. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

A closer look at the MTA’s new code of conduct that is written with the explicit intention of clearing homeless New Yorkers from trains and enable daily disinfecting of each car. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

IKEA Rego Park’s store opening has been pushed back to the fall. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

Dozens of bodies — many of which were the remains of coronavirus victims – were seen being loaded from several U-Haul trucks to a refrigerator truck outside of a Brooklyn funeral home on Wednesday. (Todd Maisel and Jessica Parks for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Samuel Hargress Jr., owner of Paris Blues in Harlem and “the soul ambassador of, that culture of community.” (Steven Kurutz for NY Times)

Vox Media furloughed 9% of its staff and will be making Curbed a part of New York Magazine. Starting May 1, Curbed will be completely furloughed for three months. There is a GoFundMe for the Vox staff who have been furloughed. (Vox Media Furlough Fund)

Looking to donate food to the city’s essential workers? Here are eight ways to deliver food without having to leave your couch. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

40 inexpensive dining destinations still open, straight from Robert Sietsema’s inexpensive dining column. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Natalie for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 19, 2020 – The “These Are the Groceries We Refuse to Buy” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The first positive case of COVID-19 is not negative, how to help the elderly, a walk through the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, and more

Today – Low: 49˚ High: 53˚
Rain in the morning and overnight.

The first New York City dweller to test positive for novel coronavirus, the teacher who returned from Italy, no longer has the disease and is expected to make a complete recovery. With a negative test, it may mean that she’s immune to the disease going forward. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

NYC United Against Coronavirus is a resource Google Doc that breaks out neighborhoods, and multiple ways to send and receive help. (NYC United Against Coronavirus)

The Gowanus Dredgers, the people who canoe in the Gowanus Canal, have put together a Google Doc of Gowanus businesses with verified information bout what’s open and what is not along with if a business has a fund for the staff. It’s a very good model for other neighborhoods. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

Four ways to help the city’s elderly people. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Cheddar cheese ramen noodles? A look at the groceries we refuse to buy, even in a crisis. (Claire Leaden for SecretNYC)

Looking at a map that visualizes ridership drops per subway station, you can get a clear picture of who has to go to work in a crisis and who has the luxury to stay home. (Ben Wellington for I Quant NY)

The MTA sustained $87 million in weekly revenue losses, which might not be great news for an agency that was already projecting being half a billion in the hole in a few years. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’re still taking the subway, Riders Alliance has a survey for you to take.

12 things to livestream or virtually explore. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Despite the environment of fear, the empty streets, riderless transit, and patronless bars and restaurants, private construction continues undeterred across the city. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The city is working on drive-thru clinics for coronavirus testing, but there are no concrete plans for people without cars. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

If hospital capacity is not vastly increased, Manhattan’s hospitals would be overwhelmed with coronavirus patients even in the most conservative of possible scenarios. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The USNS Comfort has been dispatched to the New York harbor. The hospital ship contains 1,000 hospital beds, which New York City is in desperate need of right now. (Curtis Brodner for BKLYNER)

Union Square Hospitality Group is laying off about 2,000 employees. Danny Meyer announced that he was forgoing all of his compensation and donating it to a relief fund for all USHG employees. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The volume of the unemployed has saturated the New York Department of Labor’s phone lines and crashed their website multiple times. This is the new system and it’s absolutely real. People whose last name begins with A through F should file on Monday; G through N on Tuesday; and O through Z on Wednesday. If you missed your day, you can file on Thursday or Friday. (Mary Frost for Brookly Eagle)

A live music critic opines about having no live music without self-pity. (Jon Pareles for NY Times)

Amazon has temporarily paused ordering CDs, vinyl, and all other items other than “household staples, medical supplies, or other high demand products” amid the coronavirus pandemic. Once the warehouses have no more, they won’t be restocked until at least April 5. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklyVegan)

As the slow-rolling disaster of the COVID-19 pandemic trickles down, the trash hauling industry is bracing for impact without commercial business, there’s less commercial trash to haul. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Only 50 percent of a business’s workforce can report to work outside their homes for the duration of the coronavirus outbreak, as mandated by Governor Cuomo. Businesses that provide food, medicine, and shipping supplies are exempt. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Central Park remains Manhattan’s oasis during a crisis. (Roger Clark for NY1)

A list of independent bookstores that are delivering cookbooks if you’re looking for recipe inspiration. They’re delivering normal books too. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Department of Justice announced late Tuesday night that it was closing many of the nation’s immigration courts through early April. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

There are two specific populations where a COVID-19 outbreak would become a disaster. The first population is the people in the city’s homeless shelters. A woman was identified as carrying COVID-19 within a shelter and has been hospitalized and the 8 people who shared a room with are all in quarantine. How do you enforce social distancing when you put between 8 and 20 beds in a room? (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The second population is inmates.. An inmate and a Department of Correction officer who works at gate security on Rikers Island have both tested positive for COVID-19. The Board of Correction is recommending finding low-risk inmates to release in order to allow more social distancing to prevent the virus from spreading further (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Liquor deliveries by apps like Drizly or Minibar have skyrocketed since bars closed on Monday. Every day is like New Year’s Eve. (David Gauvey Herbert for Grub Street)

Photos: Personal goodbyes from bars and restaurants across the city. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden, on its last day being open to the public. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

City Health Department officials have warned Hasidic medical professionals in Crown Heights that as much as 80 percent of the neighborhood may have already been exposed to COVID-19. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Met is projecting a $100 million loss in revenues in the coming months, as well as the likelihood of layoffs. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Following yesterday’s story about the Lyft and Uber Pool, the MTA has finally moved to limit Access-a-Ride vehicles to one passenger. (Michelle Bocanegra for Politico)

Mayor de Blasio tried to walk back his shelter-in-place comments, but the damage has been done and almost everyone remembers the de Blasio from two weeks ago that everyone hates. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

The Times profiles Brian Lehrer, the voice of NYC on the radio. (Jazmine Hughes for NY Times)

Takeout and delivery options for every situation. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for January 30, 2020 – The “So Many Non-Coronavirus Ways to Die” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Krispy Kreme is coming back to NYC, impeachment cakes, the NYPD wrote more moving violation tickets to cyclists than truck drivers in 2019, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 38˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

12 contenders for a NYC subway mascot. (Ben Yakas with illustrations by Matt Lubchansky for Gothamist)

The Lunar New Year Chinese Temple Bazaar in Queens was canceled over coronavirus fears, despite New York having no confirmed cases. (Joseph Goldstein and Jeffrey E. Singer for NY Times)

Worried about Coronavirus? Don’t be. The flu killed 5,000 Americans in the first two weeks of the year. (Buzzfeed)

If you live in NYC, you can request a Department of Transportation bike corral by filling out a form, even for a residential building. (@jeffnovich)

The NYPD issued more moving violations to bicyclists than truck drivers in 2019. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

In reaction to the Clearview AI mess with the NYPD, State Senator Brad Hoylman proposed legislation that would outright ban on biometric technology use by police on a city level, a bill is being pushed that would require the NYPD to disclose every surveillance tool it employs. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city collectively passed a ballot measure to expand the power the Civilian Complaint Review Board has to oversee the NYPD. In response, the NYPD is suing the city to prevent the change from happening. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Harlem neighborhood that Langston Hughes praised in 1944 is still one of the ‘best-kept secrets in New York.’ But it’s not quite as affordable as it once was. (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

According to Mayor Bloomberg, New York City “isn’t trying to be the lowest-priced product in the market.” Now the city is full of empty luxury apartments, because oligarchs don’t have the same kind of money that they used to. (Cory Doctorow for Boing Boing)

Krispy Kreme is coming to Times Square with a 24 hour 45,000-square-foot store and it’s bringing five more NYC locations with it. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

What happened with Fairway in Red Hook? According to their landlord private-equity ruined the store. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

15 places to find vaulted Gustavino tiles in the city. (Shirley Mgozi Nwangwa for Untapped New York)

Should New York public schools teach climate change? Wait, climate change isn’t taught in New York schools? (Scott Enman for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Hey, did you buy a lottery ticket and not check it? Two Take 5 tickets were sold and they’re each $29,249 winners. Go check your pockets. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Alamo Drafthouse in lower Manhattan was supposed to open in 2018, then it was supposed to open in 2019, now it’s been postponed until summer of this year. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

It’s been ten years since it was declared a superfund site, but the long-awaited cleanup of the Gowanus Canal officially has a start date, and it’s in September. (Devin Gannon or 6sqft)

The city paid Childrens Community Services half a billion dollars to provide homeless services since 2017, but there’s only one problem. It appears that the nonprofit doesn’t exist. (Nikita Stewart for NY Times)

Someone’s been spotted stealing the Spotted Pig’s pig. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The website for The Villager, one of the media brands inside the Schnepps empire, has been eaten by amNewYork Metro. The Villager was already the home for The Villager, Chelsea Now, Downtown Express, and Manhattan Express. Consolidate, consolidate, consolidate. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Brooklyn bakery Butter & Scotch sent 53 sheet cakes to Washington with various messages to encourage Republican senators to allow John Bolton to testify int he impeachment trial of Donald Trump. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Dozens of Rise and Resist members grouped themselves at Grand Central during the peak of rush hours, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Monday night, for a vocal demonstration, sparked by the impeachment proceedings on speed and lack of witnesses. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Brooklyn may seem like a liberal’s paradise, but politics within the borough’s Democratic party is becoming less transparent as leaders voted to hold fewer meetings and restrict member-driven resolutions. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The famous hot chocolate from City Bakery is getting a second life with founder Maury Rubin’s The Wonderbon Chocolate Co. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The team behind Brooklyn Bazaar is bringing a new restaurant within McCarren Park inside the restored bathroom building. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The most beautiful interiors in New York City, mapped. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Nothing says “punk rock” like a limited edition pair of Doc Martens with the CBGB logo stamped on them. (BrooklynVegan)

After the Knicks shit the bed (again) on Wednesday night, the entire Garden broke out in a “sell the team” chant aimed at team owner James Dolan. The Knicks are 13-36 and have had a using record 16 if the last 19 seasons. (Dan Bernstein for The Sporting News)

Video: A look at People and Animals Living Safely (PALS), a non-profit that provides a safe space for human and animal victims of domestic abuse. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has big plans for 2020, which include work on making nine subway stations ADA compliant, spending a billion dollars on signal upgrades for the A, C, and E lines, improving the 7 and F tunnels, station improvements along the J and Z lines, and working on extending the Q train to 125th St. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Shaun Donovan, a former secretary of Housing and Urban Development in the Obama administration, is planning to run for mayor of New York. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

The City Council is imagining the future of Rikers Island, with an emphasis on creating renewable energy and a waste water treatment plant is a possibility. (Gloria Palzmino for NY1)

There are 1,400 buildings whose facades have been determined to have major structural problems and are a serious threat to pedestrians, hundreds with no protections for pedestrians. Those buildings have racked up $31 million in unpaid fines from the city. (Matthew Maah for NY Times)

39 holiday happy hour deals in NYC. (Eater)