The Briefly for May 22, 2020 – The “The Beaches Will Be Open This Weekend” Memorial Day Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A new plan for Long Island City, a threat to SantaCon, Scarr’s Pizza and McSorley return, late-night fireworks, restaurant reopenings to celebrate, and more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 69˚
Possible drizzle in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 53˚ High: 65˚

Do you have blood? Can you spare some? The city’s blood supply is running “dangerously low.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What are you doing to experience new things while staying at home? SNL’s Heidi Gardner is trying a new cereal each week. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

If the ban on city dwellers continues, City Council Member Keith Powers has threatened to cancel SantaCon and ban Long Islanders from St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Please? Will you promise? (Adam Nichols for Patch)

After a week of back and forth, the city’s beaches will be open this weekend, but with no lifeguards and swimming won’t be allowed. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Nathan’s is the biggest game in Coney Island hot dogs right now, but they got there by playing dirty. Coney Island’s original hot dogger is Feltman’s. (Alyson Krueger for NY Times)

McSorley’s is back after its longest closure since opening in 1854. (EV Grieve)

Scarr’s Pizza is back too. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Archdiocese of NY shared a “Faith Forward” plan, which outlines a five-step plan to reopen New York’s churches. (Ron Lee for NY1)

Religious institutions can begin holding services, assuming they limit occupancy to ten or fewer people indoors, everyone must wear a mask and follow social distancing protocols. (NY1)

Some suggested Memorial Day reading, care of the city’s independent book shops. (Danielle Valente for Time Out)

The mayor ran for office on the idea that he wanted to bridge the gap between the two New York Cities, but if you look at the neighborhoods that have received open streets and those that have not, he’s continuing in the tradition he rallied against by denying some of the hardest-hit neighborhoods by the Covid-19 virus open spaces. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

State Assemblymember Carmen Arroyo has been removed from the Democratic primary ballot after being caught altering signatures and dates on her petition to remain on the ballot. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Central Park Park Ranger Ashley Whited rescued a team of orphaned ducks after a snapping turtle attacked and killed their mother. (Anthony Pascale for NY1)

The pandemic has shown what has always been possible, including to-go drinks from bars and restaurants. State Senator Brad Hoylman introduced legislation that would allow bars and restaurants to sell to-go drinks for two years after the pandemic is over. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

This weekend kicks off the Loisaida Festival, digitally of course. (EV Grieve)

Here’s the latest plan from a giant developer for the “future” of Long Island City, leaning heavily on commercial property, with 10-to-12 million square feet of space on 28 acres of land surrounding the area that Amazon HQ2 never was. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Big companies like Facebook and Mastercard are rethinking massive leases in Manhattan after allowing employees to work remotely on an ongoing basis. Facebook is or was close to signing a lease int he Farley Post Office building next to Penn Station, so it remains to be seen if they’ll go through with the deal. I guess you could say it’s complicated 🥴. (Danielle Balbi for The Real Deal)

Video: Climbing to the top of the Woolworth Building, in what appears to be less than legal means. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The mayor says the city could be on its way to start phase one of reopening in the first half of June. This is, of course, not a guarantee, and we’ll have to see how well the city fares during this holiday weekend as temperatures are looking favorable. One spike and we ain’t opening in June. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

I don’t know if it’s welcome news, but it’s a step towards normalcy. Beginning on Monday, you can file lawsuits electronically for the first time in multiple weeks. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

A guide to New York’s contact tracing programs. (Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

With the rise of MIS-C cases in the state, Governor Cuomo hasn’t made a decision about summer camps across the state, but it’s looking less likely. (Zack Fink for NY1)

176,000 students will be attending summer school, but it won’t be in person. The governor canceled in-person summer classes. The governor went as far as to say that it’s in question if schools will reopen in the fall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved an $8 million project to install a new pedestrian plaza beneath Brooklyn Bridge Park, which will replace a fenced-in parking lot, which is there today. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What is New York without New York bars? (Megan Abbott for NY Times)

Ridership is on an uptick, so the Staten Island ferry will increase its rush-hour service. (NY1)

Fleet Week is still happening… virtually? (Ron Lee for NY1)

15 restaurants and bars that have permanently closed because of the coronavirus. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This shouldn’t be a surprise, but that all-male restaurant panel the president has convened, which called him “one of us,” ain’t gonna help. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here are the CDC’s guidance on using cloth face coverings. (Norwood News)

Is this NYC’s oldest manhole cover? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

* Seinfeld voice* What’s the deal with all these late-night fireworks? (David Cruz for Gothamist)

8 restaurant reopenings to be excited about this week. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Thank you to reader Shiloh for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 12, 2020 – The “Maybe You Have A Better Idea for This?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on brokers fees, can you ever actually leave New York, a 10 layer sandwich to behold, Bloomberg doesn’t want you to hear this, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 45˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

Thursday is the deadline for you to change political parties in New York state. (NY1)

A draft of Citi Bike’s Bronx expansion, mapped. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

A water main breaks in New York City literally every day. There gas been more than 400 recorded water main breaks every years since 1998. It’s rare, but becoming decreasingly so, that they cause subway delays. (James Barron for NY Times)

The city, having given up on the idea of fixing the Brooklyn Bridge’s promenade, is asking you, yes you, to help come up with “creative improvements.” For being a finalist and solving a problem the city has been plagued with for years, you’ll earn yourself $13,000 and you’ve only got until April 5. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Video: The locksmith working out of Manhattan’s smallest building. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Thinking about moving? A guide of where to live in NYC• in 2020. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Victor Calise could be the MTA’s first disabled board member. The mayor nominated Calise to fill the seat made vacant in April 2019 and still has another nomination to make. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is J.G. Melon’s burger still among the city’s best burgers? According to Eater’s Ryan Rutton, it’s a simple answer of “no.” Order the chile con carne instead. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Nothing to see, just a car engulfed in flames in Crown Heights. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photos and Video: Inside the home of Denny Daniel, which doubles as The Museum of Interesting Things. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re someone who has to conquer the biggest and the baddest challenges out there, maybe this 10-layer Mexican sandwich is your speed with hot dogs, ham, refried beans, beed Milanese, and more. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The REAL ID law is going to cause nightmares for everyone. Come October, you won’t be able to get on a domestic flight using your drivers license unless it’s a REAL ID license. The only way to get it is to physically go to the DMV, which is bound to cause a rush towards the end of the summer. Here’s what you need to know. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Where to eat in Manhattan’s Chinatown. (Eater)

It’s not common that a speakeasy and its cover story are both useful, but the newly opened The Little Shop near the South Street Seaport is a fully functioning bodega and speakeasy all wrapped into one. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Five legends of the Upper West Side. (Edgar Catasus for I Love the Upper West Side)

Get ready for a hand-painted Alice in Wonderland pop-up to dominate your Instagram feed starting next month. Behind the pop-up is Alexa Meade, the artist behind Ariana Grande’s “God is a Woman music video (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What happens when you leave New York City?” Easy answer, you fall of the face of the earth. (David Crook for StreetEasy)

The Tavern by WS at Hudson Yards is “better than it should be.” Two stars. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

First you didn’t have to pay a brokers fee and now you have to? Here’s what’s going on with the brokers fee system. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Whoops, someone released a clip of Mike “please don’t say anything bad about me, I’ve spent a quarter billion dollars on this doomed presidential run” Bloomberg saying “The way you get the guns out of the kids’ hands is to throw them against the wall and frisk them,” in defense of Stop and Frisk. Bloomberg apologized for Stop and Frisk last November and maybe he thinks that’s all he’ll ever have to say on this subject? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The First Avenue L train station in Manhattan has a second new entrance on Avenue A. The entrance is not yet handicapped accessible and the MTA hopes elevators will be open by June. (Muhammad Rahman for Gothamist)

Meet the young district leader candidates looking to challenge Brooklyn’s democratic party’s status quo from the literal bottom up. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

13 bars to find a shot and beer combo for $5 or less. Unsurprisingly, I’ve been to all of these bars. (Erik Helin for Thrillist)

Thanks to my beautiful wife Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for June 7, 2019 – The “It’s Better to Work at the MTA Than to Ride It” Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, a Burger King sells fake vegan Whoppers, the world’s largest hot dog, the youths organized, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway work is relatively light thanks to the Puerto Rican Parade, but that doesn’t mean the city is without disruption. (Subway Weekender)

Simply put, this weekend’s weather looks great. (amNY)

This weekend’s forecast might give you a chance to see Jupiter in the sky. It’s close enough to earth to see it with a pair of binoculars, or at one of the multiple events put on by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York. (amNY)

The MTA installed a new time clock at an LIRR station in Queens in order to cut down on the excessive overtime which caused recent controversy, and surprise surprise, it’s already been broken. (Gothamist)

Somehow the MTA made the list of the state’s best employers. (Patch)

Drag Queen Story Hour has remained 100% awesome, but every now and then some jackass comes along trying to put a stop to it. Why should this month be any different just because it’s Pride? (Gothamist)

Does the mayor understand the story of ‘Jekyll & Hyde?’ If the mayor spent any time in the city, he might want to go to the NYPL and read a book or two. (Patch)

A community board district manager in Brooklyn secretly gave himself a raise for the three years in a row by digitally forging the signatures of the board’s chairperson. Between this and the community board district manager who bought himself an SUV, what the hell is going on with Brooklyn’s community boards? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Brazilian street artist Kobra has 18 murals across the city as part of their “Colors for Freedom” series. Here’s where you can find them all, or just look at photos of them if you’re not feeling adventurous. (Untapped Cities)

With the city on the edge of banning fur, seems like a good time to look back at the history of New York’s fur trade. (6sqft)

A Burger King in Williamsburg has been selling the Impossible Whopper on Seamless, the all-plant Whopper, with one problem. They’re selling normal beef Whoppers. (Eater)

It looks like the mayor and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand are qualifying for the Democratic Presidential Debate later this month. (Politico)

Governor Cuomo supports the giving drivers’ licenses to undocumented New Yorkers, but his longtime ally Jay Jacobs (from Long Island, of course) is calling Democrats trying to kill support for the bill. (Gothamist)

Forget all other sports New York is a Musical Chairs city now. (Deadspin)

50 years after the fact, NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill has apologized for the NYPD’s role in the Stonewall Riots. (NY Times)

Turns out trying to actually spending time with an art masterpiece is harder than you’d think. (NY Times)

This weekend’s the Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park, so grab the transit nerd in your life. It’s like Comic-Con for buses! (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re trolling for the world’s largest weiner, it’ll be at Ulysses Restaurant on the 26th as Feltman’s (the original Coney Island hot dog) is bringing a 120 pound of frank and a five foot two inch bun in support of the Headstrong Project. (Coney Island Blog)

An analysis from the Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform shows that neighborhood jails don’t hurt crime rates or property values. (Patch)

The body of Joseph Calabrese, an NYPD detective, was found by Plumb Beach, just off the Belt Parkway. This was the second apparent NYPD suicide this week. (NY Times)

Tom Brady can go to hell for multiple reasons, but this time it’s because he is attempting to trademark “Tom Terrific,” which is, of course, the nickname of New York Met Tom Seaver. (Patch)

“Why are people on bikes in the city so angry?” Maybe because of psychopaths like this who regularly attempt to run them over. (Gothamist)

Youth, who normally spend their time terrifying adult subway goers with their fun-having, organized in City Hall Park to protest the city’s slow approach to integrating public high schools. (amNY)

With a city as old as New York, you’re bound to find a few surprises when you start to dig. For a parking lot near the South Street Seaport, surprise turned to concern when discovering a thermometer factory from the nineteenth century, which contains elemental mercury, the type that becomes airborne and can cause brain damage upon inhalation. (NY Times)

The best first date spots in the city. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.