The Briefly for June 6, 2019 – The “We Can’t Stop The Ratpocalypse or Rising Sea Levels” Edition

The MTA discrimination disability lawsuit can move forward, ThriveNYC is failing the city’s schools, Uber will helicopter you between Manhattan and JFK, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Uber is offering helicopter rides between lower Manhattan and JFK Airport. Uber Copter kicks off on July 9 and will be available during afternoon commutes. (NY Times)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development is pushing a new program that would name a “Tenant of Record,” which would end succession rights, which allows relatives to take over their homes after the primary resident dies or moves out. (Patch)

We are headed for a ratpocalypse. Is climate change to blame? (Grist)

Before steam, NYC homes were heated with coal. If you look carefully on some sidewalks you can still find “coal holes,” which allowed for easy delivery. (Ephemeral New York)

After 20 years and two locations, Park Slope’s gay bar Excelsior will close on July 31. This is the second closure due to rising rents. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sealed arrest record is supposed to reduce the unjust and disproportionately burdensome effect of those records on minorities. The NYPD has decided to have its own interpretation of the law. (Gothamist)

Congrats to this year’s Excellence in Design winners, which “reflect the very best of design in public works, housing, and libraries, parks, and public art.” (Curbed)

Notice something new floating around the city this week? The Sing for Hope pianos are back, celebrating their 500th piano. You’ve got until June 23 to find a piano in the city before they are donated to schools, healthcare facilities, and community centers. (Untapped Cities)

The NYPD is withholding its lists of which officers work at which precincts, claiming stating who is working where would endanger public safety. A lawsuit from the Legal Aid Society will decide if that reasoning is valid. (Patch)

A Midtown fender bender is not news, but it is when one of the cars is driven by Tracy Morgan and it’s a new $2 million Bugatti. (Gothamist)

It seems former prosecutor in the Central Park Five case Linda Fairstein doesn’t know about the Streisand Effect. The woman who coerced confessions from children about a crime they didn’t commit took to the internet to defend her honor after being forced to resign from Vassar’s board of trustees from a student body that did not want her there because of her involvement in the case. (The Root)

Where to eat something quick if you’re running late to a Broadway show. (The Infatuation)

How long would you stay in a rent-stabilized apartment if you could? Ed Higgins has been renting an apartment on Ludlow St for 43 years. His rent in 1976 was $100 a month and now it’s still under $600. (6sqft)

Polly Trottenberg, a voice of sanity on the MTA’s board, is resigning effective immediately upon being replaced. She was a de Blasio nomination in 2014 and has been highly critical of Governor Cuomo’s initiatives in the past. She did not state a reason for her resignation. (Politico)

What’s going on with the F train this week? A dead baby shark (do do do do do do) was found on an F train platform in Manhattan. (Gothamist)

The city’s Fair Fares program has 50,000 participants, and a big help was the expansion of the program in April. The program will expand in 2020 to any New Yorker living under the poverty line. (Curbed)

The de Blasio administration has begun seizing ice cream trucks from owners who are accused of evading nearly $4.5 million in fines. It seems that shell corporations aren’t just for our presidents anymore, because 76 ice cream trucks changed hands between shell corporations to avoid paying traffic and parking tickets. The city has seized 46 trucks so far. (Patch)

It seems the one thing the city’s politicians can agree on is the new entrance designs for Penn Station. (Downtown Express)

ThriveNYC provides no tangible support for the city’s students and councilmember Mark Treyger is calling for a “significant investment” in social and emotional services for students. There are over one million students in the city’s public schools and only 1,335 social workers, 2,958 guidance counselors and 560 school psychologists supporting those students. There are more safety agents than all those combined. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A paid witness used by the defense of Daniel Pantaleo, the officer accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, claimed Garner’s death could not have been caused by the hold. He was not present when it occurred and his appearance in court was paid by the defense. (amNY)

Over 100,000,000 have seen The Lion King on Broadway with over 9,000 performances, which are two staggering numbers. (CBS New York)

Councilman Antonio Reynoso announced he is running for Brooklyn Borough President once Eric Adams’ term limits have run out in 2021. (Brooklyn Paper)

After months of presentations and public feedback, the MTA announced a draft plan to improve the Bronx’s buses by improving speeds, reliability and streamlining routes that haven’t changed in decades. (Curbed)

The lawsuit against the MTA that would force the construction of elevators whenever a station is closed for improvements was given the go-ahead in the state’s supreme court, stating the MTA is not about the city’s Human Rights Law’s prohibition of discrimination based on disability. (amNY)

15 stellar spots for raw bar. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 24, 2019 – The “14th Street Will Be Closed to Cars” Edition

“Grab a cop’s taser” is still a bad idea, the 14th St bike lanes will be permanent, Shirley Chisholm’s statue design was unveiled, the Charging Bull’s balls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The design for the Shirley Chisholm statue at Prospect Park has been selected. Artists Amanda Williams and Olalekan Jeyifous’s design is the first of five She Built NYC monuments announced. (Women.nyc)

Finally, some decision about 14th St during the L Train Slowdown. Starting in June, 14th St will be closed to traffic from 3rd Ave to 9th Ave. In addition to 14h St, the bike lanes on 12th and 13th will be made permanent. Maybe this is in hopes of softening the blow of just how rough it will get for commuters. The MTA is already warning that even if you allocate extra time to your journey on the L train once the Slowdown takes hold, you probably won’t make it on the first train anyway. (amNY)

Federal immigration trial attorneys refuse make the 1.1 mile trip between Federal Plaza and the new immigration courtrooms on Varick St and are choosing to appear via video conference instead. (Gothamist)

Cardinal Timothy Dolan announced an affordable housing portfolio with 866 apartments across six developments in the city. (Bronx Times)

There are bad ideas and then there are “grab a cop’s taser and zap three NYPD officers” bad ideas. (Gothamist)

Over fifteen years since it was set up, the makeshift memorial for 9/11 victims in the Union Square subway station is beginning to show its age. (Untapped Cities)

It’s shocking just how bad the city’s procedures can be for the people affected by lead paint. Local Law One was the city’s promise to end lead poisoning by 2010. Even with a spotlight shone by WNYC/Gothamist, the city’s Housing Preservation and Development failed the city’s residents while their children are poisoned by their homes. (Gothamist)

Two NYPD officers are being investigated for the police’s response to the horrific ax murder and attempted murder in the Bushwick Houses. (amNY)

If laying in the sun under JFK’s busiest runways, the TWA Hotel’s pool and observation deck are right up your alley. (6sqft)

A love letter to the MTA’s R-46 subway cars, the ones with a faux wood interior, orange and yellow seats, and have been in service since the mid-70s. (Gothamist)

Those newly $3.00 expensive MetroCards could win you an all-expenses-paid vacation to Hawaii if you buy one of the quarter million qualifying cards at specific subway stations. Once you have a card, you have to remember to register it online and a single winner will be chosen next month. Good luck. (Gothamist)

The SummerStage lineup was announced. (Time Out)

59% of New Yorkers support having a homeless shelter in their neighborhood. It seems the NIMBY opposition to shelters appears to be the minority. (Patch)

Watch this hypnotic animation showing how the L trains will operate during the Slowdown. (@NYCTSubway)

NYC’s recycling program’s mascots finally have names and OH MY GOD WHAT ARE THOSE THINGS. (amNY)

Planned Parenthood of New York City’s Project Street Beat is bringing a mobile health center which will offer HIV testing, overdose prevention, counseling, and other services in an attempt to expand coverage to marginalized communities. (amNY)

Two new ax-throwing bars are coming to Brooklyn. Just when you thought Brooklyn couldn’t get more Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

The average commute to work in the city is 43 minutes, the longest of any large American city. Just another way to show that NYC is #1. Only 4% of New Yorkers can get to work within 30 minutes. (Patch)

Go to Bowling Green and you’ll see two lines of people waiting to take photos at the Charging Bull. One by the bull’s head and the longer line are of people looking to snap a photo of themselves rubbing its balls. Why? (Atlas Obscura)

Shanghai has its own Charging Bull, but in contrast, no one is rubbing its balls. (Business Insider)

The five best cakes in the city.

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The Briefly for January 21, 2019 – The “No Solo Women Allowed at the Bar” Edition

Prep school students’ blackface video goes public, the blind subway magician, the mayor’s broken ebike promises, food carts get health grades, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’re trying to get around at night and you live on the 1, 6, 7, A, F, or Q, you might want to avoid the subways. (Subway Changes)

Join the Parks Department for the Martin Luther King Jr Day nationally-observered day of service in parks in Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. (NYC Parks)

The restaurant Nello is banning solo women from sitting at the bar thanks to, and this is not a joke, “a crackdown on hookers.” (Eater)

Have you seen Olmedo Renteria, a 78-year-old renowned magician, on the subway? A lifelong performer, he has not let his loss of sight slow him down. (NY Times)

The city’s Housing Preservation and Development agency is being sued as part of a class-action lawsuit for violating the Violence Against Women Act. (Gothamist)

Rezoning in New York City has historically lead to evictions, harassment, and racial segregation. Churches United for Fair Housing is proposing a Racial Impact Study before future rezoning takes place. (Bushwick Daily)

The scientific study that there is built-in white supremacy in Yelp reviews that criticize to “authenticity.” (Eater)

Next time Whoopi Goldberg or anyone opens their mouth about how bike lanes inconvenience drivers, remember Madison Jane Lyden, who would not be dead if Central Park West had a protected bike lane. (NY Post)

That did not stop her. (Streetsblog)

What is in Willets Point’s future? Affordable housing and potentially a soccer stadium. (6sqft)

Stop by the Ace Hotel New York to see a revival of Reverend Jen Miller’s Trolls museum, once referred to as a remnant o the “real Lower East Side.” Yes, Trolls like the dolls. (Untapped Cities)

WeWork’s CEO has ben personally buying properties to lease them to his company. That seems weird, right? (The Real Deal)

11 go-to restaurants and bars near Union Square. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio broke his promise of how the NYPD would enforce his ban on electric bikes. City law states businesses are liable for the $500 fine that their workers receive. The NYPD seized 910 bikes and issued 669 tickets and 1,383 moving violations. Only 210 businesses were given citations. (Gothamist)

A second person has died as a result of the Sheepshead Bay hammer attack. The third victim remains in critical condition. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

If you think getting around in a snowstorm in 2019 is tough (not that we’ve had one yet), imagine having to convince a horse to go out into a storm. (NY Times)

All 5,500 food carts in the city will receive health inspections. 24 have been inspected since late December. Only 5,476 to go. (NY Post)

“Don’t look behind the curtain. We’re dead. This is for you.” There was a double suicide at Yotel New York on Friday, and they left a tip for the cleaning crew. (NY Post)

How the federal shutdown affects SNAP benefits. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Scenes from the Women’s March. (Gothamist)

Today in “caught in blackface,” here are freshmen from the $50,000 a year Poly Prep Country Day School in blackface dancing around their home. (NY Post)

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