The Briefly for November 17-19, 2020 – The “There Are No Consequences” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Cuomo works to undermind de Blasio (again), 2020 mall Santas are sadder than usual, teens are scarier than usual, the best Indian, and more

Today – Low: 31˚ High: 49˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Review: The new Yellow Rose in the East Village, which opens at 8 am on Sundays for breakfast tacos in addition to its Texas-inspired fare. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Video: Many of us aren’t getting to LaGuardia any time soon. For those of us not traveling, check out the airport’s new water show. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

“I think there has to be consequences for anyone who doesn’t wear a mask.” More hollow words from the mayor when asked about the NYPD not wearing masks. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

There’s a Twitter account dedicated to photos of the NYPD without masks. (@nypdmaskwatch)

The city is implementing new rules for outdoor dining, which include additional barriers, moving outdoor setups when it snows, making curbside seating barriers sturdier, and more. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The MTA is adding voices of “iconic New Yorkers” to subway announcements. (ShayeWeaver for Time Out)

This dystopian year will be capped off with mall Santas wearing plastic shields sitting behind plexiglass sheets. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Take a look at five zip codes that are testing over 5% for Covid-19. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s 3% positivity threshold will trigger a school shutdown, but Governor Cuomo is going on TV to undermine whatever confidence the city has left in MAyor de Blasio, saying the 3% threshold could change. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Also bandied about by Governor Cuomo during television interviews is shutting down indoor dining in NYC. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Seeing a group of teens on the subway during normal times? Scary. Seeing a group of teens on the subway during the pandemic? Terrifying. Teens ended October with a Covid-19 positivity rating of 3.9%. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

We’re getting a real look at what outdoor dining could look like this winter, as temperatures are expected to drop below freezing for the first time this season. (Ben Yakas and Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Own your own Ol’ Dirty Bastard action figure. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The Gowanus Canal dredging is officially underway. 72,400 cubic yards of black mayonnaise are expected to be removed. Cleanup is expected to continue for at least another decade. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Speaking of things that will take a while, the city’s tourism industry isn’t projected to return to pre-pandemic levels until late 2024. Get ready for a lot of staycation advertising campaigns in the meantime. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Restoration on the Endale Arch in Prospect Park has been completed and the result is an absolutely beautiful sight. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Disney is teaming up with Roberta’s to offer Disney-themed pizzas for Thanksgiving. It is exceptionally weird to think that the “Donald” pizza includes any meat on it (it includes sausage). (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

How did Mark Szuszkievicz, a Republican QAnon supporter, get so many votes in Coney Island’s Democratic district? (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

FIT offered “free” temporary housing to its laid-off dorm workers in late October, after they learned they would lose their jobs, health insurance, and homes in the residence halls. Some were paid less than $17,000 a year. Last week they learned the housing ain’t free. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

The best Indian restaurants in NYC. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, and Arden Shore for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Flo for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for October 25 – 26, 2020 – The “Vote or Die” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Early voting is open, the best Vietnamese food in the city, dredging the Gowanus, Mayor de Blasio’s legacy of failure, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 56˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

The best restaurants near NYC’s early voting locations. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Early voting is open, now let’s talk about the legality of ballot selfies. (Valeriya Safronova for NY Times)

Speaking of early voting, it started across the city on Saturday and there were lines everywhere. Nearly 100,0000 voted on the first day of early voting, more than in all of 2018’s early voting. (David Cruz and Jen Chung for Gothamist)

On Friday, Mayor de Blasio announced a plan to recruit hundreds of city workers in a matter of days to join an “Election Observer Corps.” He has not recruited a single person, nor has he trained anyone. By contrast, AG Letitia James, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, and the head of Common Cause NY, Susan Lerner, already have 600 statewide volunteers who have been training for weeks for the election and have been monitoring polling sites already. Seems like the mayor could have endorsed this effort instead of announcing a new one less than 24 hours before early voting began. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

We will have hundreds of additional cops in uniform citywide who will be at the ready should they be needed.” -NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan, who maybe doesn’t realize that having a larger NYPD presence during an election may only serve to make things worse. (Danny Lewish for Gothamist)

This is the same NYPD whose union endorsed President Trump. (NBC New York)

Photos and Video: A Barred Owl hanging out. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Video: The Animal Care Centers rescued a pig from a Brooklyn backyard. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The city sells off unpaid property debts on a regular basis. The sale of debt was the subject of a Last Week Tonight program from a few years ago. While it raises money for the city, it also encourages foreclosures and the displacement of lower-income homeowners. This year’s tax lien sale has been postponed multiple times and City Council members are pushing to eliminate the program altogether. (Peter Senzamici for The City)

The EPA will begin dredging the Gowanus Canal mid-November. At the bottom of the canal sits a very thick and very old layer of tar, human poop and if the rumors are true, a few dead bodies. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Video: No questions asked about how these daredevils found their way to the roof of the GE Building, which is closed to visitors, but the views are spectacular. (svvvk on YouTube)

State officials have pulled a controversial proposal that would have allowed non-lawyers to oversee special education complaints in New York City. The proposal was first made in January. In the 2019-2020 school year, the city had 10,797 complaints, 96% of New York state’s complaints. Each complaint is legally supposed to be resolved in under 75 days, but NYC’s cases take 259 days on average. The penalty for such a failure? Nothing. These students deserve better. (Reema Amin for The City)

Interview: Meet Brenda Suchilt, the Newtown Creek Alliance’s new horticulturist. (Billy McEntee for Greenpointers)

Apartment Porn: A $12.75 million Cobble Hill townhouse with a vineyard-like garden that’s bigger than almost every bar with outdoor space, gated parking, and two wine cellars. One wine cellar? Please. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The best Vietnamese restaurants in NYC. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The secrets of the new Greenpoint public library. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The number of young children in NYCHA housing at risk of lead exposure is three times greater than previously thought, according to Bart Schwartz, the federal monitor overseeing the NYCHA. The city certified the number at 3,000 two years ago. The number is 9,000. Poisoning the children of the city will likely end up high on the list of Bill de Blasio’s legacy as mayor. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Speaking of Bill de Blasio’s accomplishments and legacy, the city is headed for the highest level of traffic deaths since the mayor took office, the third straight year of rising deaths, completely erasing any and all progress he could claim as part of his own Vision Zero program. This year includes two months of zero traffic fatalities due to the pandemic, it’s hard to imagine how high the body count would be without it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel has just reopened its pool-cuzzi and Runway Chalet at JFK airport. The pool purifies itself every 30 minutes and is kept at a cozy 95 degrees. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A look at the new public art available across Brooklyn. (Keira Wingate for Bklyner)

Three bars within the zoned shutdown areas in Brooklyn and Queens had their liquor licenses temporarily suspended for throwing illegal indoor parties. 30 Fantastic Bar in Sunset Park, Da Mikelle Palace in Forest Hills, and Wise Bar & Grill in Sheepshead Bay. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Before you feel bad for The Strand posting they may close (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan), let’s look a little deeper. The Strand fired union workers while accepting $1-2 million of PPP loans (Labor Notes) Owner Nancy Bass Wyder, who is married to Oregon Senator Ron Wyden, purchased $115,000 in Amazon stock in April and made an additional purchase of up to $200,000 in June. (Ed Lin for Barrons) The Upper West Side location was met with protests. (Carol Tannenhauser and Kate Koza for West Side Rag) On a micro scale, buying at The Strand instead of your neighborhood bookstore is no different than buying from Amazon.

On a micro scale, supporting The Strand over your neighborhood bookstore is akin to buying from Amazon instead of locally.

At this point, let’s celebrate that NYC isn’t the rattiest city in America. Los Angeles and Chicago are worse than we are and you take the wins where you can get them. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Times Square really wants you to visit. Their latest ploy to get you to the one place you never want to visit is the Taste of Times Square Week, which runs through October 30 and offers a $35 prix fixe menu at 20 different restaurants with an appetizer, main and dessert. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Shed in Hudson Yards has reopened with a solo exhibition by artist Howardena Pindell called Rope/Fire/Water, which explores the historical traumas of America, namely slavery, racism, and white supremacy. (Monika Hankova for Untapped New York)

An examination of how New York’s slavery history is still present all over the city. (Zachary Kussin for Untapped New York)

The Green-Wood Cemetery is hosting a Dia de los Muertos celebration all this week. (Dozier Hasty for Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Mapo Tofu in the city. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Michael for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for June 23, 2020 – The “Are These NYC’s Bad Old Days?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s primary day in NYC, a look at the rules of outdoor dining in phase two, surprising chickens in a drug bust, the NY Post’s “copaganda,” and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 82˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Here’s how to vote in today’s primary. (BKLYNER)

Today is the primary across the city, but don’t expect results so quickly this time around. Absentee ballots aren’t counted until eight days past the election. We could be waiting a while. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, let me introduce you to the stacked highways all across Manhattan idea from the 1930s. (Joshua Mu for Viewing NYC)

After a spike in gun violence over the weekend, the mayor said the city isn’t going back to the bad old days where there was “so much violence in this city,” but also “Nor are we going back to the bad old days where policing was done the wrong way.” According to that statement, we are currently living in “the bad old days.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

With phase two, the city’s playgrounds have reopened. They are literally no safer than they used to be, so don’t expect sanitization or regular cleanings. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

The city formally announced that phase two would start on Monday on Thursday, giving restaurants four days to prepare and comply with a new set of regulations for outdoor dining. (Gary He for Eater)

What to expect from phase two of NYC’s reopening. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Here are the guidelines for reopened restaurants as a part of phase two. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

More than 3,000 restaurants have signed up to set up outdoor dining as the city enters the second phase of its reopening. The restaurants approved will be allowed to set up tables and chairs in parking spaces and sidewalks. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state moratorium on evictions ended over the weekend. There are advocacy groups that are estimating 50,000 – 60,000 cases could be filed in the next few days. This is the first wave of expected cases, another protection for people who were directly affected by Covid-19 expires in August. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hundreds of people gathered in protest to demand the eviction ban continues until the state has recovered from the Covid-19 crisis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An investigation is ongoing after a man fell onto the tracks and was hit and killed by the 7 train on Sunday night. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

“Back in my day, if you wanted to go to a Target, you had to go to Brooklyn, the Bronx, or New Jersey” is what very lame grandparents will tell their grandkids. Target announced it is opening stores on the Upper East and West Sides. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Facebook is eyeing expanding its footprint in the Hudson Yards, taking over the space that will be left vacant by Neiman Marcus’s bankruptcy. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos and Video: 10,000+ riders took part in the Street Riders’ Black Lives Matter Ride through Manhattan. Fun fact, more people showed up for the ride than turned out for Trump’s Tulsa rally. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Toby Tenenbaum for BrooklynVegan)

Heads up: The produce at this week’s farmers markets should be fantastic. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to a loophole about how the NYPD’s cars are funded, the two lawyers that are accused of tossing Molotov cocktails into empty police cars may be facing life in prison. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A look at the NY Post’s recent history of running “copaganda” articles that share police narratives with anonymous sourcing, zero additional verification, and in contradiction of facts. (Kay Dervishi for City and State)

The NYPD are known liars. Despite their crying in public about being “poisoned” by Shake Shack employees, a thorough review shows that the officers involved never displayed any symptoms of illness and the Shake Shack employees couldn’t have known that the order was for NYPD officers because the order was placed online. Despite this, police unions sent out information that the officers had started throwing up and invented a narrative of Antifa employees inside Shake Shack. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea testified in defense of the police’s actions against protesters during the first week of June without providing details and dodging every possible question that involved specifics and dismissed a delivery person’s arrest as a “false report.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Look around the city and you’ll see iconic statues wearing face masks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is usually the best party in the city every year, the Mermaid Parade, is going to be virtual and take place on August 29. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

The Inwood rezoning lawsuit, which was ruled that the de Blasio administration failed to account for the potential change in the racial makeup of the neighborhood, could forever change how the city plans neighborhoods towards something more equitable. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Members of Sure We Can, the city’s only nonprofit redemption center, is requesting $2.3 million from the city’s budget, saying they will have to close their Bushwick location that it has occupied for ten years without it, where hundreds of canners gather each morning to sort and redeem their bottles and cans.  (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The surprising part of this drug bust was unrelated to the drugs, it was the chickens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man who tried to escape Rikers Island on Thursday made another attempt to escape on Sunday. According to inmates at Rikers, the measures taken to combat Covid-19 have made Rikers intolerable. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Okay, phase two is in effect, but let’s look at what phase three could mean for the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

28 restaurants open for outdoor dining this week. (Eater)