The Briefly for January 14, 2020 – The “AOC vs Cuomo, Round 2” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The AG looks at the NYPD’s subway fare evasion, how Tiffany’s moved hundreds of millions in jewlery, the head of Brooklyn’s democrats resigns, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

How do you move hundreds of millions of dollars in view of the public in NYC without getting robbed? Very carefully. Here’s the story of how Tiffany’s moved everything in its store overnight. (James Barron for NY Times)

Attorney General Letitia James announced on Monday that her office would investigate the NYPD and if its fare evasion policing in the subways has illegally targeted New Yorkers of color. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The winners and losers of the Queens bus network redesign. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Cuomo’s AirTrain is about to hit a new obstacle: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

There are thirteen million registered voters in New York state, with one million designated as “inactive,” and whose names were not on the voter rolls at election sites, which is a violation of the 14th Amendment and the National Voting Rights Act of 1993 according to a federal judge. While it may seem trivial, remember that the Queens DA race was decided by 55 votes. Moving forward, all registered voters’ names will be available at polling sites. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Information on how to register to vote.

The leader of the Brooklyn Democratic Party, Frank Seddio, is stepping down amid concerns about the party’s and his own finances. Seddio is facing $2.2 million in lawsuits and the party’s cash reserves have dwindled from $505,000 in 2013 to $32,800 in 2019. (Aidan Graham and Kevin Duggan for amNewYorkMetro)

Photos: When it comes to the city’s skies, birds usually get all the attention. Don’t forget the city’s bats. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

RIP Matthew Maher, owner of McSorley’s since the 60s. The bar is staying in the family, daughter Teresa Maher de a Haba is the owner now. (EV Grieve)

Here are the top ten checked out books in the NYPL’s history. You’ll notice a theme running through the list. “Goodnight Moon” did not make the list do to a personal vendetta against the book by children’s librarian Anne Carroll Moore. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Have you seen “The Geographic Center of NYC” in Woodside on the corner of 58th Street and Queens Boulevard? Besides being a cool piece of trivia it’s also completely wrong. If this isn’t the place, where is it? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If your usual subway station is outdoors, the winters can be brutal. A century ago, the IRT provided potbelly stoves in stations for its riders to stay warm while waiting for the train. (Ephemeral New York)

Signal problems ruined about four out of every five morning commutes in 2019, according to a new Riders Alliance analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The L train showdown is running ahead of schedule and should be completed by April, but not without some weekend closures. The MTA announced the weekends of January 17, February 14, and March 20 with closures from 8th Av to Broadway Junction. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

In addition to the L construction, the MTA announced emergency overnight construction was necessary on the G train this week through Friday night from midnight to 1:30am. (Greenpointers)

On a dry day, the MTA pumps 13 million gallons of water from its system. Monday’s water main break added half a million gallons to that, causing chaos on the 4, 5, 6, A, B, and C lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s time to declare the days of the cooking competition celebrity chef over. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It started as an argument between two dads about their kids near Dyker Park, but it turned into a double stabbing. One was stabbed in the chest and neck and the other was stabbed in the leg. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In terms of housing and transportation costs, NYC ranks tenth in the nation, right after Houston but right before Minneapolis-St Paul. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Baby Yoda has a mural in the East Village. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The plan to rezone Bushwick hit a possibly fatal roadblock Monday after city officials and local politicians failed to reach an agreement on affordable housing requirements. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The de Blasio administration testified at a 2019 City Council meeting that they did not have information about who was riding the heavily subsidized NYC Ferry system. The mayor used his insistence that the boats were being used by low-income New Yorkers as justification to dramatically expand the ferry system. It was all a lie, because the city’s Economic Development Corporation had already conducted two rider surveys that showed the median income of riders was over $100,000. For each rider on the ferry that pays $2.75, the city pays $9.34. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Vans opened Skate Space 198, a free indoor skatepark right off the Jefferson stop in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYCHA residents filed about 59,770 bug infestation complaints in the first nine months of 2019, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s the best pizza in NYC? In honor of National Pizza Week, Patch asked politicians, comedians, and Broadway stars where to get their favorite slice. It’s mostly unconventional picks for the city’s best, even if Chuck Schumer’s pick is one of the closest pizza places to his apartment. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mama’s Too, on the list, is rolling out a meatball parm that is already being described as “the city’s best meatball parm.” (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The Briefly for December 30, 2019 – The “Are FaceTime Calls on the Subway A Form of Terrorism?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Hudson Yards may never be completed, the Chelsea flea market closed, the flu ramps up, a brand new “dive” bar, what makes Scarr’s Pizza the best, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 44˚
Rain until evening.

Sometimes it all goes according to plan and sometimes you’re the guy who stole a cherry picker, spray painted “BIRD GOD” on the arch in Grand Army Plaza, got stuck and had to be rescued and arrested by the NYPD. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Does any construction project in New York ever complete? The Hudson Yards were supposed to be completed by 2024, but now the developer isn’t giving a timetable for when they’ll be done. (The Real Deal)

This isn’t a new concept, Atlantic Yards was supposed to be a ten year project, but now it’ll scheduled to for at least 25 years. It’s becoming more and more common that the first phase of these massive, neighborhood-disrupting construction projects is completed with much fanfare and the rest of the projects, which usually include schools for the neighborhood, quietly linger forever. (Pamela Wong for Bklyner)

Are you one of the monsters who has FaceTime video calls while on the subway? Well good news for you, the MTA will add phone and wifi access to the L train tunnels below the East River. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork)

The Times Square ball drop by the numbers. (Diane Pham for 6sqft)

Photos: Take a look at the Times Square NYE ball, since you’re not crazy enough to go see it drop in person. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

How to spend New Year’s Eve 2020 in NYC without going near Times Square. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

“We are not adequately preparing to launch a successful congestion pricing program by January 2021” writes Corey Johnson. Congestion pricing is supposed to drive, no pun intended, people to use public transit rather than their cars when traveling into Manhattan. The MTA, trying to find the silver lining to the recent downturn in ridership, says that the downturn actually created capacity for those who will switch back from cars to public transit. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

The Annex Antiques Fair and Flea Market in Chelsea, NYC’s largest flea market and counted Andy Warhol among those who frequented it, has lost its lease. After 45 years, finding a new home for the flea market is nearly impossible, as any raw space in the area has been swallowed up by developers. (Katie Van Syckle for NY Times)

The East Village’s Zum Schneider is closing in February after their landlord was “not interested” in renewing their lease. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New Yorkers with the flu exploded from 1,130 reported cases to 3,010 reported cases over the two weeks ending on December 21. The flu season doesn’t end until May, so there’s still plenty of time to get your shot. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

At the opening of Stonewall House, the city’s first LGBTQ-friendly affordable senior housing development, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams invoked slavery and predicted that the residence could lead to trouble in the neighborhood. His comments were confusing, questionable in nature, and invoked an us-vs-them mentality that flies in the face of the purpose of Stonewall House. Adams didn’t return calls about this speech, but maybe he will when he’s trying to be the city’s mayor in 2021. (Matt Tracy and Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

In the wake of Tessa Majors’s murder in Morningside Park, an undisclosed white supremecist group is targeting Barnard College and Columbia University staff with racist robocalls. The NYPD’s Racial and Ethnically Motivated Extremism group is looking into the calls. (Julia Reinstein for BuzzFeed News)

The mayor will ramp up police presences in Williamsburg, Crown Heights and Borough Park as well as implementing a new school curriculum focusing on the danger of hate crimes after a Hanukkah rife with anti-Semitic attacks. The new Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes will be overseeing the efforts. (Sanjana Karanth for HuffPost)

When Justin Theroux opened Ray’s Bar, there was a lot of questioning whether it was even possible to open a brand new bar and call it a dive bar. Enter Dolly’s Swing & Dive, meant to evoke Dolly Parton. The owners push the concept of a dive bar by claiming they’re taking the things they like about a dive bar and “made it a little more grown up.” Can a dive bar have a crab-and-shrimp roll you’d be willing to eat? (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The Nevins Street raccoon, named Chepe by the MTA, continues to evade capture by the NYPD. I bet they’d catch it in a heartbeat if it jumped a turnstile. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Video: What makes Scarr’s Pizza’s one of the city’s best and healthiest? House-milled flour. (Murilo Ferreira for Eater)

Video: Selfish lady holds up traffic for 2 blocks because she won’t move her double parked car, with over a million views on YouTube. Welcome to Forest Hills. (ActionKid)

12 new restaurants worth checking out while the rest of New York is still on vacation.(Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The Briefly for December 27, 2019: The “Rudest City? I’ll Show You How Rude This City Can Get” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The electric bike bill is dead, the “gentrification tax” debate, meet State Assembly hopeful Emily Gallagher, the most beautiful restaurants of 2019 & more

Today – Low: 39˚ High: 52˚
Overcast throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚

It’s not the weekend without subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

The city’s lights never dim, but why? Turns out New York earned the nickname “The City That Never Sleeps.” (Derek M. Norman for NY Times)

New York City has a idling problem. Yes, idling trucks have been in issue for years, but one truck is nothing compared to cruise ships, which pump the city’s air full of 1,200 tons of toxic fumes every year. (Lisa M. Collins for NY Times)

New York City is the rudest city in America according to the dumb yokel idiots at Business Insider. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If 2019 was the year of the “pied-à-terre tax” debate, 2020 will be the year of the gentrification tax debate. Currently, homebuyers pay taxes based on the assessed value of the home, which is usually lower than the market value in gentrifying neighborhoods. The lead to change the law is being led by Republican City Councilmember Joe Borelli. Speaker Corey Johnson has said it’s “highly unlikely it will get fixed” this session. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

We missed a white Christmas and it looks like we’ll miss a white New Year’s Eve as well. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What were the top restaurant standbys of the year for the staff of Eater? (Eater)

Don’t play on the ice in city parks. Two boys earned that lesson the hard way, but they were rescued by a friend. If you’re ever in this unfortunate circumstance, these are why there are rescue ladders all around. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Did you recently buy Egg White Salad and Old Fashioned Potato Salad from Trader Joe’s? There’s a recall. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

They’ve been mum on details, but the NYPD has located the third suspend in Tessa Majors’s stabbing. (Mark Hellum for amNewYork)

What’s in a nickname? What’s the origin of The Big Apple? (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Governor Cuomo wants to put a high-speed train system to connect New York City with upstate and is assemble a panel of engineers to review feasibility. For a low cost of $14 billion, the trains will go 77 mph instead of 51 mph. The current average speed of the subway is 17mph. Maybe we could use $14 billion to improve that instead. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The governor vetoed the electric bike and scooter bill that overwhelmingly passed the legislature in Albany. The legislature is out of session, so despite veto-proof majorities, it’s nearly impossible to override the veto. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Congratulations to the jackass who drove their car into the protected pedestrian lane of the Pulaski Bridge. (Greenpointers)

Mulchfest has begun! (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

Meet Greenpoint’s Emily Gallagher, an activist and primary challenger against the 77-year-old Joe Lentol who has been in the State Assembly since 1973. Gallagher is running on a progressive platform of environmental sustainability, housing justice, and transit improvement. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

The most beautiful restaurants of the year. (Serena Dai for Eater)