The Briefly for June 26, 2019 – The “The Triboro: Here Comes A New Subway Line” Edition

Rental reforms, Cardi B faces felony charges, the Central Park squirrel census, WorldPride begins, the new I Voted stickers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A look at changes to the rental laws for everyone. Security deposits are limited to one month’s rent and landlords have 14 days to return them once you’ve moved out, application fees are limited to $20 (even with a background check), and more. (StreetEasy)

A look at how subway delays are tied to the city’s homeless crisis the city is currently facing. In the first three months of 2019, there was nearly the same number of train delays related to the homeless as there was in all of 2014. (NY Times)

Manhattan post-work bar picks. (amNY)

The Triboro is an idea for a new subway line that would start in the Bronx, stop in Randall’s Island, head down through Astoria, cut through Ridgewood and cut through the southern parts of Brooklyn down to Bay Ridge and possibly continue on to the St. George, where the Staten Island Ferry terminates. While it sounds like a fantasy, the proposed cost is less than half of the Second Avenue subway, would connect 17 different subway lines along the route. A bill was introduced by Latrice Walker to the state assembly that would require the MTA to conduct a feasibility study. (Welcome2TheBronx)

How to spend 10 hours in Greenpoint. (Brooklyn Based)

Louis CK continues to have problems with consent when it comes to the venues he performs in. Brooklyn Bazaar released an apology after the masturbating-into-a-plant-while-blocking-the-door comedian appeared at a rental event as a “surprise.” (BrooklynVegan)

The MTA may never make your commute smoother, but a change in perspective and a decent amount of patience can go a long way, which is what author Reny Amoros set out to do in ‘7 Life Lessons the NYC Subway Unintentionally Taught Me.’ (Reny Amoros)

Video: Capturing the ‘Beyond the Streets’ graffiti and street art exhibit in one minute by Chop ‘Em Down Films. (Brooklyn Street Art)

Passive-aggressive notes never go far in NYC, and the one Nobletree Coffee left as a reason for their closing faired just as well. After they tried to blame low foot traffic in the neighborhood, their note was met with another accusing them of having mediocre coffee and bad service. (Eater)

As Gowanus’ rezoning hangs over the neighborhood like the sword of Damaclese, the Landmarks Preservation Commission put five buildings in the neighborhood into consideration for landmark status. (Curbed)

The city’s schools are coming up short when it comes to room for special education children in pre-Kindergarten. At the low end, the city is 200 seats short, but program closures put the number closer to 300. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Harbir Parmar was sentenced to three years in prison for kidnapping and sexually assaulting a woman who was supposed to be his Uber fare. He also charged her over $1,000 for the trip and for that he plead guilty of wire fraud. (Gothamist)

A list of places for tourists to go (none of them are “straight to hell) during WorldPride. (NY Times)

These new “I Voted” stickers are boring compared to the subway-themed stickers. (Gothamist)

The first of three ASPCA low-cost vet centers will be built in East New York and is expected to open next year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Whoops. Looks like Cardi B will be facing 14 total charges, including felonies, a big difference from the two misdemeanors she previously faced for the incident. (Gothamist)

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District, which consists of 54 row houses constructed between 1906 and 1913. (Curbed)

Feltman’s was the original Coney Island hot dog. For two years a revival of the brand was available in Coney Island, but the operators of Luna Park gave Feltman’s the boot following a series of broken promises from Luna Park. The hot dogs are available elsewhere, but no longer in Coney Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Stranger Things will be taking over the Wonder Wheel (which is not a part of Luna Park) On July 4 and through the weekend as a prelude to Stranger Things season 3, Scoops Ahoy will be selling ice cream, ad the July 4 fireworks will be a special Hawkins Fourth of July Spectacular. (amNY)

Desmond Amofah, a YouTube star who went by Etika, went missing last week was found dead in the East River at the age of 29. (Gothamist)

Is there anything our current president’s administration can’t ruin? On the verge of WorldPride the news came out that the federal government “gifted” a flagpole and LGBT pride flag the NYC Parks Department so it wouldn’t have to appear in a national park. As a result, the NYC Parks Department permanently owns the flagpole. (Gothamist)

The Port Authority, who recently complained that Manhattan’s congestion pricing would be financially unfair to people who use its bridges and tunnels, is looking to raise the price of tolls system-wide and place new tolls on Uber and Lyft drivers accessing any of the area’s airports. The board will vote on it in September. (Politico)

The 2019 Central Park Squirrel Census Report is in! There are 2,373 squirrels that live in Central Park. If you really love squirrels or well-designed products, you can also purchase the Census in book form. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A trip to (and photos from) the Department of Sanitation’s Museum of Trash. (Gothamist)

The everything bagel is everything. Sesame and poppy seeds, accompanied by dried garlic, onion, and salt: Anything else, in addition, is against the law( or it should be). Now that we’ve established that the everything bagel is king of the bagels, who invented the combination? Does the lineage go back further than 1979 at Charlie’s Bagels in Howard Beach? (Atlas Obscura)

Photos from the start of WorldPride. (NY Times)

Facebook is looking at a one million-square-foot lease at 50 Hudson Yards. No public announcement, no massive tax breaks, no helicopter pad on the roof. (The Real Deal)

The Broadway show King Kong announced it will be closing in August after disappointing reviews and ticket sales. (NY Times)

20 of the city’s tastiest and quirkiest ice cream shops. (6sqft)

The mayor’s office lobbied, against a change in the city’s charter aimed at allowing the Civilian Complaint Review Board to prosecute discipline charges when police officers lie during an investigation of misconduct. The mayor’s argument is that the current system works fine. (Gotham Gazette)

Do the police belong at Pride? (NY Times)

21 top restaurants in Flatiron and Gramercy. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 19, 2019 – The “That’s Not Pizza, It’s A Strawberry Tart” Edition

The new head of the NYCHA is the highest paid city employee, the city okays six new LGBTQ landmarks, the MTA gets sued for its ad practices, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest,

2019 is the summer of the NYPL’s Bookmobile. The Bookmobile is making its debut this week, operating as a mobile library and offering all the same services. By the end of the summer, the NYPL will have three Bookmobiles. (Untapped Cities)

The Mermaid Parade is this weekend, here are the routes and street closures in the People’s Playground. (Curbed)

Dominique Ansel’s latest creation is here and boy is it an eye-roller. They’re tiramisu made to look like greek coffee cups, strawberry tarts that look like a slice of pizza, pavlova that looks like an everything bagel, and other twists on New York staples. (Time Out)

The new head of the NYCHA’s salary of $400,000 will make him the highest paid city official. Gregory Russ is going from the Minneapolis Housing Authority to the largest in the nation. The $400k salary is $231,000 higher than the last permanent head of the agency. (The City)

Three Lives, on the corner of Waverly and W 10th, has reopened after being closed by the Department of Buildings and having to sell books on the sidewalk. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Someone left a life-like baby doll in Crocheron Park in Bayside, which triggered a full-on NYPD and FDNY response. (QNS)

DUMBO is celebrating the ten year anniversary of the Manhattan Bridge Archway becoming open to the public. Prior to its life as a plaza, it was used for Department of Transportation storage. (6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is covering up Marc Chagall’s “The Lovers” until Thursday in honor of World Refugee Day, to highlight what a world would look like without the art of refugees. (Gothamist)

Some suggestions for unofficial places to watch the July 4th fireworks. (Patch)

Add another entry to your list of unconventional museums in the city. Poster House is “the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters.” No word if there will be a blacklight and velvet section. (Untapped Cities)

Six of NYC’s historic LGBTQ sites are now city landmarks. The Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse, Caffee Cino, the LGBT Center, the Women’s Liberation Center, the James Baldwin Residence, and Audre Lorde’s Residence made the list. (Curbed)

The city’s critics seem to hate Au Cheval, but that isn’t slowing down people who willingly wait over an hour for a burger. (Grub Street)

Fighting back investors and developers, four areas of Sunset Park have received landmark designation from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which will prevent demolition or large changes to the homes inside the landmark districts. Quick trivia: If you see a brown street sign instead of a green one, you’re in a historic district. (6sqft)

If someone visiting New York asked you how to get tickets to the Statue of Liberty, would you know how? Either buy them online or walk past the dozens of guys trying to sell you tickets all around Bowling Green and buy them at Castle Clinton. While the article is clearly an SEO play, it’s still something most New Yorkers probably didn’t know. (Curbed)

Where does the MTA draw the line with subway ads when it comes to sex? Boner pills, the Museum of Sex, breast implants, condoms, and Tinder all get the go ahead, but they draw the line with sex toys because they are a “sexually oriented business.” Dame Products is suing the MTA over their murky advertising rules. Somehow Tinder’s “DTF” campaign wasn’t about sex? (Patch)

A guide to the elections on June 25. (amNY)

An interview with State Senator Julia Salazar focused on real estate, which took place on the eve of the passage of the state’s new rent reform laws. (The Real Deal)

10 dishes under $20 to try in Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio nominated Jeffrey Roth, a deputy commissioner for policy and external affairs at the TLC, to lead the Taxi & Limousine Commission in a pick that, in the early stages, seems relatively free of controversy. He must be approved by the City Council before taking the position (amNY)

The city is debating banning Foie Gras as part of a dozen animal welfare bills that were discussed this week. Earlier this year the US Supreme Court upheld California’s foie gras ban, so the legislative path is clear if the city wants to go down it. (amNY)

No one was as vocal a supporter for the death penalty for the Central Park Five than the current president of the United States. If you think he was apologetic when asked about it this week, I would like to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge. (NY Times)

10 walking tours that even New Yorkers will love. A lofty claim, but who wouldn’t be interested a Chinatown food tour, a speakeasy tour of the West Village, or a ghost tour of Greenwich Village? (6sqft)

There’s a new Frank Ape mural in the East Village, part of the 100 Gates Project. (EV Grieve)

10 summer bottomless brunch spots in Astoria. (hint: take the ferry there). (We Heart Astoria)

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The Briefly for June 11, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars of New York Are Getting Saucy” Edition

14th St will become a busway in July, the mayor’s nemesis is a 16-year-old teen, New Yorkers support ending the measles religious exemption, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Two Bridges towers are at the center of a legal battle, centered around the developers’ attempts to work around the city council and the land use review procedures. (Curbed)

Respect to whoever was able to cover an entire Q train with graffiti extremely quickly without being caught. (@JMartinezNYC)

Welcome to Soho, or as the Times puts it, “CBD stores and face-mask pushers are going to destroy us all.” (NY Times)

The Brooklyn Pizza War of 2019 has only just begun. L&B Spumoni Gardens is opening up a DUMBO outpost mere steps from Grimaldi’s and Juliana’s. May the best slice win. (Eater)

It appears that Robert De Niro is on the verge of building a movie studio in Astoria. (QNS)

A correction from yesterday (thanks Harry!), the apartment building planned for the former Hell’s Angels clubhouse will be 22 apartments, not 22 stories. (Curbed)

Tiffani Torres is 16, a twice-caller on “Ask the Mayor” on WNYC, an activist with Teens Take Charge, and a thorn in the mayor’s side. She’s correctly criticized the mayor for his DOA presidential run distracting him from city business and has been vocal about the systemic issues facing the city’s schools. Is it too late to elect her mayor? She sat down for an interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Does Times Square need a 24-hour, multi-story “immersive” Krispy Kreme with a theater and, no I’m not kidding, a goddamn “glaze waterfall?” Of course it does. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Pride Parade took over Park Slope last weekend with heavy splashes of color, celebration, politicians, and remembrance of the Stonewall Riots half a century ago. (Brooklyn Paper)

Layleen Polanco, a 27-year old transgender woman, was found dead at Rikers Island on Friday. Polanco was a member of the House of Xtravaganza (get yourself up to speed on Ball Culture) and was arrested in April for assault and possession of a controlled substance. (Patch)

The city council scheduled a hearing to look into accusations against Grubhub (who owns Seamless), as well as Uber Eats, Doordash and the like, from restaurants accusing the company of charging fees for customer calls that never resulted in orders. (Eater)

10 of the best running spots in New York City, even if I think saying the High Line is a great place to run is like saying the Brooklyn Bridge is a great place to bike. (6sqft)

A helicopter crashed into AXA Equitable Center in Midtown, killing the pilot. Have you noticed how many helicopters are constantly flying around Manhattan? Manhattan has three public heliports and this was the second crash in less than a month, but that doesn’t seem to slow down the $800 trips to the Hamptons or the new service to take people to JFK Airport. (NY Times)

“Oh, you’re a girl, I thought you were a guy,” is an auspicious way to start a job somewhere. A chef is suing Hudson Yards Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, claiming she was fired for being a woman. (Eater)

With the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, New York has a path to become the first state to decriminalize sex work, even in the face of criticism from the governor, the mayor, and Corey Johnson. (Patch)

The NYPD are arresting turnstile jumpers. The officers have wide latitude to decide who they arrest and who they ticket, so it should become obvious very quickly that people of color will be arrested at a higher rate. In 2019 people of color represent 87% of people arrested for farebeating. exact numbers aren’t known because the NYPD is refusing to comply with a court order demanding them to disclose these numbers. (Gothamist)

The conversation about rent control has gotten so muddy and opaque it’s hard to know if this article which says that mom-and-pop landlords may decide to sell their buildings if rent reform passes, is steeped in the truth or has roots in one of the many astroturfing campaigns from larger landlords and developers. (amNY)

New Yorkers overwhelmingly support the end of religious exemptions for the measles vaccine. Overwhelming is 85%, which includes more than 80% support from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant populations polled. There’s a bill in the state’ legislature as you read this, but there is only a week left in the legislative session until summer recess. (Patch)

St. James Place in Bed Stuy is now Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace Way. (amNY)

Congrats to Gothamist on their site redesign. (Gothamist)

The perfect time for a sci-fi radio show is after midnight when everything is quiet and your imagination is ripe for exploration of its dark recesses. The “Hour of the Wolf” has aired between 1am – 3am on Thursday mornings since 1972. Helmed by Jim Freund, the show has had nearly every writer of importance on the show, the first U.S. broadcast of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and whose website was originally a collaboration with Tim Berners-Lee, the literal father of the world wide web. A living piece of broadcasting history on Atlantic Avenue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 14th St busway will arrive on July 1, drastically changing traffic and (hopefully_ speeding up the buses. (amNY)

32 great places to eat something kind of healthy for dinner. (The Infatuation)

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