The Briefly for October 7, 2019 – The “A $41 Million Oversight in Long Island City” Edition

Late-night subway closures, safe injection sites get another boost, the woman in the Bronx Zoo lion’s enclosure wasn’t as brave/stupid as you think, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

You’re in the clear for late-night trains this week, unless you’re taking the 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, A, F, N, Q, or R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Construction meant to eventually speed up the subways is causing all sorts of problems for anyone who needs to get around at night, especially for people coming and going from work. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Columbia University is honoring Maya Angelou, Gloria E. Anzaldúa, Diana Chang, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, A. Revathi, Ntozake Shange, and Leslie Marmon Silko by hanging their names on a banner above the names of male philosophers that are engraved on the building. (Untapped Cities)

Take a look at what Brooklyn’s tallest office building will look like on the inside. (Curbed)

With $41 million spent on the Hunter’s Point library, you wouldn’t imagine they’d already be rearranging the books, but here we are. Three fiction sections will be relocated after it was pointed out that they were only accessible via the stairs and anyone unable to use stairs would be shut out of those sections. The staff says they’ll retrieve books for people who want to check them out, but maybe instead an accessible library should have been designed instead. (Gothamist)

We’re getting close to peak foliage in the city, so until we’re past it I’ll keep listing these foliage guides. The carless New Yorker’s guide to fall foliage. (Patch)

The luxury apartment development that will sit on the old 5 Pointz spot in Queens got full-throated support for a 1,100 apartment expansion from Community Board 5 after setting aside 5,000 square feet for a library, creating additional below-market-rate housing, and increasing the size of the artist studio and gallery. (Curbed)

8 notable NYC projects designed by Latino architects. (Curbed)

Dante in Greenwich Village has been named the #1 bar in the world. (Time Out)

Did your favorites make the list? Here are the restaurants ordered closed this week. (Patch)

Is Governor Cuomo scared to open safe injection sites in the city? A federal judge ruled this week that safe injection sites don’t violate federal law, so what’s he waiting for? (Gothamist)

Para Roberto is the city’s newest monument which is in tribute to Roberto Clemente, which features bronze sugar cane stalks, a chair made of baseball bats and stickball bats adorned with the Puerto Rican flag. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Okay, who’s the asshole pointing lasers at planes? (Gothamist)

Five slices in five boroughs in one weekend day. It sounds impossible, but an uphill battle never stopped a New Yorker before. Welcome to the Five Borough Pizza Challenge. (QNS)

There was a rumor that an Outback Steakhouse was moving into the old Union Square Coffee Shop location. Thankfully, that rumor isn’t true, but a Chase bank is going in alongside a Just by Chole. (Gothamist)

The borough with the most heat and hot water complaints in the city is the Bronx, with 33.1% of the city’s complaints. (Curbed)

What building has the most complaints? It’s on Elmhurst Ave in Queens<>/a>. (Jackson Heights Post)

In praise of the vegan-egg sandwich that’s almost as satisfying as its bodega cousin. (Grub Street)

After the second friendly-fire killing this year, advocates are calling for more firearms training for the NYPD. (Gothamist)

Photo galleries of coslay from New York Comic Con: Gothamist | Gizmodo | Time Out | Brooklyn Vegan

An important note about Myah Autry, the woman wanted by the NYPD for jumping into the lion and giraffe enclosures at the Bronx Zoo: While she was inside the enclosure, she was on the other side of a moat from the lions and not nearly in the danger she’d like you to think she was in. Now her real danger comes from the NYPD. (NY Times)

A 24-year-old suspect was arrested for killing four men assumed to be homeless in Chinatown and a fifth was taken to a hospital. (NY Times)

A history of Red Hook’s Barnacle Parade, the annual taunting that Hurricane Sandy may have damaged the neighborhood but it did not break its spirits. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

It took less than a day for the brand new playground at Tompkins Square Park to be vandalized. (EV Grieve)

The 24th bike rider killed by a motorist in the city in 2019 is 10-year-old Dalerjon Shahobiddinov of Brooklyn. (Streetsblog)

Brooklyn’s best dive bars. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for May 13, 2019 – The “The Thing Is, I’m Not Sorry” Edition

The mayor announces the city will work more closely with ICE, CitiBike’s electric bikes aren’t coming back until the fall, these kittens need adopting, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes hit the 4, 6, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains. (Subway Changes)

It’s been seven years since Hurricane Sandy and the city has only spent 54% of the $14.7 billion in the federal aid set aside for recovery. City Comptroller Scott Stringer blames federal bureaucracy but also puts blame on City Hall’s lack of urgency to protect itself against the next storm. (Curbed)

The Times is getting in on the de Blasio anti-endorsement train. (NY Times)

10 quiet places to escape the city’s noises. (Untapped Cities)

A look back to Bertha Heyman, a swindler of men in New York from the 1880s. Even from prison, she swindled a man out of his life’s savings. (Atlas Obscura)

Anna Sorokin, from prison, said she’d be “lying to you and to everyone else and to myself if I said I was sorry for anything.” Maybe the next step is conning someone out of their life’s savings. (NY Times)

A walk through Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market is an exercise in bathing yourself in the chaotic glow of multiple colors and shapes of neon lights which has a distinct “city” feel. The Times looks back with photos at when neon lights shone with hope and glamour and gave New York and Times Square a visual identity. (NY Times)

Are you ready for a summer of floating LED billboards at city beaches? (Gothamist)

Some of us love birds but don’t have the patience for bird watching. Maybe that’s part of the Central Park Mandarin Duck’s appeal. If you can’t be bothered with finding the hot duck, there’s Nicolas Holiber’s Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project, which is bringing ten sculptures of native NY birds in danger of going extinct to the medians of Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA’s 7 Train work is completed, with the trains programmed for optimal cruising speed and increases the number of trains per hour during peak service from 25-27 to 29. (Sunnyside Post)

The first electric unicycle explosion happened near Union Square, which started a two-alarm fire. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including a triple-digit violation, which really takes effort. (Patch)

22 bars where you can actually find a seat. (The Infatuation)

This year’s NYC Century Bike Tour will be the last. Transportation Alternatives’ strategy has changed over the last 30 years and so has riding a bicycle in the city. With about 10% of all New Yorkers riding a bike several times a month, biking no longer needs to be established as a legitimate form of transportation. (Streetsblog)

“The vast, vast majority of undocumented people in this city know their city government is protecting them, respecting them, supporting them.” Mayor de Blasio announced the city will be working even more closely cooperate with ICE. (Patch)

A guide to all of the reasons that the mayor is running for president, like being habitually late, he gets driven to the gym on a daily basis to avoid taking the train, and… no one can make this guy look like a viable candidate. (Gothamist)

16 of the coolest hotel pools in the city, including some open to the public. (Curbed)

Imagine the terror of one million New Yorkers moving on the same day. That day used to be May 1 when almost all of the city’s leases were up. Imagine the equivalent of a million New Yorkers all moving on the same day. (CityMetric)

Where to go drinking with your dog on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

One of the most prolific members of the online white supremacist community was ID’d as 30-year-old Flushing resident Joseph Jordan, according to an investigation from the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center. (Gothamist)

The governor is calling for investigations into possible widespread fraud at the MTA over the misreporting of overtime. If you’re looking for a blow-by-blow of politicians, transit officials, and labor representatives pointing fingers and shift blame, there was an “emergency” MTA board meeting where labor representatives and Governor Cuomo’s MTA appointees pointed fingers, shifted blame, and of course, got nothing accomplished. (amNY & Second Ave Sagas)

It’s the start of kitten season in the city, which means the ASPCA is expecting 1,500 kittens from May to October. They are looking for people willing to foster kittens and offers training, food, supplies, and support. Plus “I’m fostering kittens right now” will look very good on your Tinder profile. (Gothamist)

Video: Peter Wallker dissects preconceived notions about the dangers of “cyclists.” (The Guardian)

Something must be seriously screwed up with CitiBike’s pedal-assisted bikes. They were pulled from the streets in April for a problem with the brakes and they won’t be seen again until the fall. (Streetsblog)

Meet the NYCHA plumber that earned over $200,000 in overtime last year. (The City)

The city’s top 14 burgers, from The Daily Meal’s list of the best 101 in the nation. (Patch)

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The Briefly for February 21, 2019 – The “No One Thinks de Blasio Should Run for President” Edition

A look at the Public Advocate debate, low-level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn, the city lied to get more FEMA funding, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It looks like a museum, but it’s a button store named for a Gertrude Stein poem. (Atlas Obscura)

The city subpoenaed 20,000 apartment listings from Airbnb as a response to what Mayor de Blasio says is Airbnb’s unwillingness to cooperate with the city to crackdown on illegal hotels. (The Real Deal)

The 11 best things to do on Roosevelt Island, but maybe you want to wait for spring first. (6sqft)

There is a special election for the city’s Public Advocate on Tuesday. As a reader of The Briefly you are among some of the most informed voters in the city. Here’s what you need to know about the election. (Gothamist)

Watch the second Public Advocate debate in full. (NY1)

There is one thing that all the Public Advocate candidates from last night’s debate agree on: Bill de Blasio should not run for president. (Politico)

StreetsPAC has endorsed Melissa Mark-Viverito for Public Advocate. (Streetsblog)

The 12 best restaurants in Rego Park and Forest Hills. (Grub Street)

Five takeaways from the Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

New York City will never become a cashless society if Councilman Ritchie Torres’s bill passes. (NY Times)

Low level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn. At a cost of $2,000 per arrest, it’s quite a bit of savings. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Can you run a business out of your apartment? (Bushwick Daily)

If you want to party like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide. If you want to avoid partying like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide of places to avoid. (amNY)

13 bars and restaurants for history lovers across the United States, including Manhattan’s Fraunces Tavern. (Atlas Obscura)

The gentrification of Bed Stuy is threatening the existence of the city’s last black-owned LGBTQ club. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Have you ever been through a breakup so bad that it makes you swear off dating altogether? The End Corporate Welfare Act is the City Council’s version of that with luring giant corporations to the city with subsidies. (Patch)

Take a look at Spike Lee’s New York City. (StreetEasy)

How can the MTA fix the R train? Congressman Max Rose’s solution is Solomon-esque. (amNY)

Murder in the city is up by 55% this year compared to last. Some police officers are blaming the end of stop and frisk. (NY Post)

The city lied to FEMA to get more Hurricane Sandy relief funding and will pay the federal government back more than $5.3 million as part of a tentative settlement. (NY Times)

East Harlem residents are feeling pissed about this closed public bathroom. So are the recipients of the more than 1,500 public urination summonses in the area. (Patch)

Winter is harsh on the city, but it causes chaos, explosions, fires, leaks, and uncertainty underground, where electric, steam, water, and gas lines flow. Climate change is making it worse. (NY Times)

Bookmark this list for the next extremely cold day. 19 stellar soups. (Eater)

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