The Briefly for November 8, 2019 – The “The Subway Psychic and El Bloombito Returns!” Weekend Edition

A push to lift the street vendor cap, the end of the food hall gold rush, the pumpkin smasher arrested, the Rockefeller Center tree is on its way, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Just as your schedule is really getting busy, here comes a weekend of heavy subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Finding Keano, New York’s most elusive subway psychic. (NY Times)

Monday is Veterans Day, here is what will be closed as a result of either the holiday or the Fifth Avenue parade. (Patch)

The return of El Bloombito!!! (@ElBloombito)

Have you ever heard Mayor Bloomberg try to speak Spanish? Then you’ll understand why Rachel Figueroa-Levin’s Twitter parody account exists. (Salon)

Mayor Bloomberg’s possible announcement that he will be joining the Democratic presidential candidates can mean one thing. (Patch)

5 NYC buildings that changed American history. (NY Times)

There are an estimated 20,000 food and non-food street vendors in the city, but the number of permits has been capped at 5,100 since the 1980s. State Senator Jessica Ramos wants to bring the city’s rules about street vendors into the 21st century. Her bill would lift the cap but also enforce the rules and permitting on everyone and allow municipalities to decide where vendors could and couldn’t set up shop. (Gothamist)

Five reasons to lift the street vendor cap. (Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: Twelve bathrooms, an indoor pool, eleven thousand square feet, a glass elevator, six floors, a theater, glassed garage, and the former home of Lady Gaga. All yours for $18 million. (StreetEasy)

Going deep with Jacqueline Novak on the success and bringing her show ‘Get On Your Knees’ back to Off-Broadway. (Gothamist)

Bumper. Cars. On. Ice. (amNewYork)

Photos: Inside Flushing’s Hindu temple, completed in 1977, which possibly makes it the first in the country. (Gothamist)

Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. Here is where you can see pieces of the wall in the city. (6sqft)

You can either go to FAO Schwarz, or you can book the $3,000/night suite at the Conrad New York Midtown, which is filled with FAO Schwarz toys where you can order toy room service and get a private shopping tour of the store. (6sqft)

Where to eat or order Thanksgiving dinner in NYC. (Grub Street)

The idiot who jumped into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo was arrested on Wednesday night. Myah Autry faces two charges of criminal trespass and turned herself in. (Patch)

If the Hot Duck has taught us anything, it’s that bird watching in the city is cool again. Photos of the hawks on Governors Island. (Laura Goggin Photography)

“Brutal” and “uncomfortable to watch.” Tina: The Tina Turner Musical is not getting the highest of praise. (amNewYork)

The Bay Ridge pumpkin smasher has been arrested. He was pulled over for a tail light and the NYPD allegedly also found cocaine in his car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The National Transportation Safety Board issued a series of recommendations to increase bike safety in the US, but the only one people are focusing on is mandatory helmets. A mandatory helmet law would effectively kill all bike sharing programs in the city, but the mayor would rather tell all cyclists to wear helmets than fix the roads to make them safer for everyone. (Gothamist)

Earlier in the week I poked fun at how many food halls are opening across the city, but there are some early indicators that the “gold rush” over food halls is ending. (Eater)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree is cut and on its way to the city. It should be arriving on a flatbed on Saturday. (Untapped New York)

10 NYC residential buildings with the best amenities for dogs. (6sqft)

The Met Gala theme for 2020 is conceptual at best and straight up confusing at worst. About Time: Fashion and Duration? Yup. (Gothamist)

The court battle over control of WBAI is ongoing but the station has returned local programming to the airwaves. (Patch)

The sudden appearance of an armored ICE vehicle on a residential street sparked panic in Ridgewood on Thursday. Turns out it wasn’t a random immigration arrest, but part of a federal investigation into someone hoarding about 50 guns including a machine gun, gun parts, and ammunition. (Gothamist)

Another dunk on Trump from Attorney General Letitia James and New York state. This time around the president was hit with a $2 million penalty for persistently using the Trump foundation for illegal activity. (Patch)

Take a look inside the last occupied apartments inside the Chelsea Hotel. (NY Times)

As winter creeps towards us every year, the same feeling of dread overcomes the city as it tightens its muscles in fear and anticipation. SantaCon is coming. Steer clear on December 14th. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s best diner breakfasts, according to the staff of the Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Photos: BRIC After Dark at the Knockdown Center. (The Briefly)

The Briefly for November 6, 2019 – The “Where Have All The Duane Reades Gone” Edition

Election results, the ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans, ICE continues to make courthouse arrests, the best bear, never enough food halls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

In a new effort by the MTA and law enforcement to crack down on fare evasion, New York City reportedly opened a $500 million decoy subway station this week to catch turnstile jumpers. (The Onion)

Something is wrong when even Duane Reade is reducing its footprint in the city. (Gothamist)

The 2019 New York City 40 Under 40 Rising Stars. (City and State)

Only 1.14% of the registered voters in the city turned out to vote early this election. Come on, people! Let’s pick it up next time around. (amNewYork)

Jumaane Williams was re-elected as the city’s public advocate with 74.13% of the vote. (Patch)

All five ballot referendums were emphatically answered by voters as “YES!” Ranked-choice voting was approved by 72.94%. Civilian Complaint Review Board reform was approved by 77.05%. Ethics and governance approved with 77.05%. Establishing a rainy-day find was approved by 70.51%. and ULURP changes were approved by 75.83%. (amNewYork)

Melinda Katz is Queens’ new District Attorney. (QNS.com)

Central Park will be adding signage to acknowledge that in 1857 the city kicked the mostly African American inhabitants of Seneca Village off their land in order to create the park. (Curbed)

David’s Briskey House in Bed-Stuy is a legendary Jewish deli run by a Yemeni, proving that food belongs to no one. (Atlas Obscura)

The NYC filming locations for Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman. (Untapped New York)

Alanis Morisette will be celebrating the opening of the ‘Jagged Little Pill’ Broadway musical with an acoustic performance of the album at the Apollo Theater. (Brooklyn Vegan)

There will be a wall in the Gowanus Canal, and National Grid is going to pay for it. It’s true, as a part of the Superfund cleanup, National Grid will build a wall to prevent liquid tar from re-contaminating the canal on the old Fulton Manufactured Gas Plant. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: A feature on Macon Hardware in Bed-Stuy, and Clara Hayes, the 92-year-old unofficial mayor of the block and proprietor, who runs the place. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re purchasing health insurance from the marketplace, you’ve got until December 15 to enroll for coverage for January 1. (amNewYork)

What to do in the Bronx that’s not baseball, the zoo or the Botanical Garden. (6sqft)

Don’t say Alec Baldwin punched you if Alec Baldwin didn’t actually punch you. (Gothamist)

Your reward for voting is this series of adorable videos of Sonya the brown bear acting like a little puppy when seeing her former caretaker. (Gothamist)

Are there enough food halls in Midtown? Never! Here come two more. (6sqft)

A list of demands for Dermot Shea, the city’s new police commissioner. (Streetsblog)

When Mayor de Blasio announced Dermot Shea was to be the city’s next police commissioner, he passed over Benjamin Tucker, the second-highest-ranking overall and the top black police official. This is the third time that the mayor passed over Tucker for the position, instead, he picked Benjamin Bratton, James O’Neill, and now Dermot Shea. (NY Times)

If crime declines, should the number of cops follow it? (Gothamist)

ICE has continued to arrest immigrants at courthouses in New York. The Immigrant Defense Project has counted 112 incidents and sightings and that agents are ignoring the state’s rule that prevents federal agents from making arrests in courthouses without a warrant. (amNewYork)

The Dreamland Roller Disco has landed in a new Brooklyn location. The latest incarnation is at City Point in Downtown Brooklyn. (Time Out)

The ultimate guide to eating at Wegmans. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)