The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

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The Briefly for July 18, 2019 – The “Act Like a Summer Goth to Stay Cool” Edition

There have been two additional ConEd blackouts this week, will electric scooters raise real estate prices, hidden bookstores, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the landlords challenging the new rent reforms. (The Real Deal)

Did you know you can see pieces of the Berlin Wall in the city? There’s a piece in an office building, another in Ripley’s Believe It Or Not, another on the Intrepid, but three sections stand together in the United Nations’ garden. (Untapped Cities)

The mayor is “jaded” over ConEd. This follows the Staten Island outage, the Upper West Side outage and a third reported outage in Coney Island all in the same week. He urged New Yorkers to set air conditioners at 78 to help lighten the load for everyone. (amNY)

We have entered the stages of a heat emergency across the city. The official advice is that if you don’t have to be outside or in the sun, pretend you’re a goth teen and stay indoors. If you don’t have air conditioning, the city has 500 cooling centers you have access to. (Curbed)

El Chapo was sentenced to life in prison, putting his career in crime and also the woes caused by his constant crossing of the Brooklyn Bridge to travel between prison and the courthouse under police escort, to an end. (NY Times)

Here’s a map of the city’s cooling centers. (6sqft)

The night that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldren stepped foot on the moon, there was a viewing party in Central Park. The “Moon-In” showed just how moon-crazy the city had gotten. (6sqft)

Nothing quite like a rush-hour breakdown of MetroCard machines to really instill confidence that the MTA will get the OMNY contactless payment right. The MetroCard systems stopped accepting credit cards and the MTA’s Twitter account announced the issue five minutes after it was fixed. Great job all around. (Patch)

When the plastic bag ban takes hold, it only pertains to grocery and big-box stores. Some advocates say it doesn’t go far enough, but the city will feel the collective pain together in March. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The story of BK Yoga Club, an inclusive, body-positive yoga studio in Dumbo, run by Alicia Ferguson and Paris Alexandra. (Bushwick Daily)

The city firefighter that was arrested last month for being caught on video seemingly trying to run over a cyclist is back on the job following his one-month suspension. Further disciplinary action may follow. (Streetsblog)

The top ten hidden bookstores in the city. (Untapped Cities)

This seems like a great weekend to have brunch reservations in order to minimize the amount of time spent waiting for a table outside. 30 great brunch spots that take reservations. (The Infatuation)

Take a look inside Pomander Walk with this house for same, the exclusive 1920s Tudor-style gated community on the Upper West Side. For a bit over $2 million, it can be yours. (6sqft)

The chief business officer at the electric scooter company Lime was boasting that access to electric scooters means more access to bikes and scooters would mean the city would become more accessible, which raise real estate prices. Is that an argument for or against scooters? (The Real Deal)

Seen a bunch of Waldos around the city today? There’s a reason for that. (amNY)

The Time Out Market food hall had its doors shut by the Department of Health after it failed a restaurant inspection and hasn’t re-opened since. They are working to address the issues pointed out by their 102 point violation before they can reopen. (Brooklyn Paper)

At this point, nothing the mayor says or does should be able to disappoint us, but he keeps finding new ways to do instill a feeling of malaise to anyone who hears him speaking. The latest eye-roll comes from calls to have Officer Daniel Pantaleo fired for his role in Eric Garner’s death. (NY Times)

Gossip Girl is already being rebooted. (Huff Post)

There have been at least eight ICE raids across the city in the last five days. Do not open your doors for law enforcement if they do not have the proper paperwork to compel you. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

20 standout restaurants and bars in Prospect Heights. (Eater)

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