The Briefly for June 19, 2020 – The “Here Comes Phase Two” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Ways to honor Juneteenth, a true bike lane for the Brooklyn Bridge is possible, NYC’s latest notable racist, the Rent Guidelines Board vote, and more

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 78˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 68˚ High: 79˚

A guide to Juneteenth marching, mourning, picnicking, and dancing. (Emmy Freedman and Erin O’Brien)

We’re only at the tail end of phase one, but why are some people acting like we’re past it all? (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

It’s official, we’re headed to phase two on Monday. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

What this also means is that outdoor dining returns on Monday. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Let’s hope we don’t see more clusters of idiots hanging out outside bars in large groups drinking and eating. Governor Cuomo has expanded the power os the State Liquor Authority to revoke or suspend liquor licenses for restaurants and bars that don’t enforce proper social distancing rules. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Department of Transportation is in talks with Mayor Bill de Blasio to study turning a roadway on the Brooklyn Bridge into a bike lane. Someone check to see if hell’s frozen over yet. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

There will always be people who naysay transportation evolutions. In Flushing, Queens, the businesses on Main Street are the ones making a stink about it. (Dan Rivoli for NY1)

Remember when the city pledged to bring a bike-share program with 1,000 dockless bikes to Staten Island? Bike sales are up, Citi Bike usage shot up in May, and Staten Island remains the only borough without any bike-share program. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Video: Relax with a tour through the blooming roses at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Who should have the power in the process of approving liquor licenses? Should it be the community board, which represents the people of the neighborhood or a business improvement district, which represents local businesses? The Lower West Side Partnership is attempting to muscle its way into the decision making process. (Bowery Boogie)

The scandals at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Sunset Park are too long to list. Most recently inmate Jamel Floyd died after being pepper-sprayed in the face. New reports are surfacing that inmates are being confined to their cells nearly 24 hours a day and have provided very little response to Covid-19. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

The mayor has the talent to make people hate him. Two different City Councilmembers put forward different resolutions for his removal by Governor Cuomo, one because he did too much to maintain order during George Floyd protests and another because he didn’t do enough to maintain order. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

The MTA’s influence goes far beyond NYC. The MTA’s budget is spent in all but one of the continental US states, meaning the MTA’s finding is also America’s funding. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

I Need More, the boutique owned by the late Jimmy Webb, will be (closing for good at the end of July. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Rents will freeze for roughly 2 million New Yorkers with rent-regulated apartments for the next year to help ease the financial burden of the novel coronavirus pandemic. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Rent Guidelines Board vote, explained. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Photos: Photographer Peter Schafer’s portrait series of New Yorkers in mask. (Howard Halle, photos by Peter Schafer for Time Out)

Meet Elisa Crespo, the trans candidate looking to succeed Richie Torres as a Bronx City Councilmember. Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Ready to start riding a bike? Check out these nine tips from cyclists. (Monica Torres for HuffPost)

It’s been over a year since the death of Layleen Polanco and there still haven’t been any significant reforms around solitary confinement. One of the reasons reforms stalled was Mayor de Blasio’s opposition to them. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

New York State’s 118 billionaires increased their net worth by an estimated $44.9 billion, or 8.6 percent, from March 18 to May 15. More than 100 state legislators won’t approve any spending cuts without raising taxes on the wealthy. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The City Council passed a ban on police chokeholds the mayor said he’ll sign, despite weeks of his arguing for an exception for potentially fatal situations. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Say hello to Abraham Knofler, the city’s latest noted racist. He’s the guy who stood outside of Burly Coffee in Bed-Stuy for at least eleven minutes arguing that their Black Lives Matter sign was somehow offensive. IT’s a miracle that he didn’t get his ass beaten. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Did you know that New York City has a “Rat Row?” Well due to the city’s restaurants being closed, Rat Row has been expanding. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

If you’re looking for a mud-slinging primary, look no further than the 43rd Assembly district contest between incumbent Diana Richardson and former State Senator Jesse Hamilton. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Looking for more nature in your life? Here are 10 Forever Wild nature preserves in the city. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Get ready, because New York City is entering phase two of reopening on Monday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

16 books about New York City by Black authors. (6sqft)

If you’re formulating an escape for Rikers Island, how do you get to freedom? IF you’re the inmate who tried to escape on Thursday, you try to swim across the East River. Sadly, they didn’t make it without being caught. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

It felt like we just rid ourselves of the Islanders, but they may be coming back. The owners of the Nassau Coliseum indefinitely closed the arena, leaving the team with nowhere to play their home games. With no other options, the Isles could come back to Brooklyn until their new home at the Belmont Racetrack is constructed. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Eagle)

More than 50 New York lawmakers called for Gov. Andrew Cuomo to strengthen his eviction ban extension, which ends on Monday. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The Naval Cemetery Landscape is once again open to the public for those that want a moment of respite and also one surrounded by buried bodies. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Association of Jewish Camp Operators is suing Governor Andrew Cuomo over his closure of sleepaway camps this summer, arguing the order violates their constitutional rights of the free exercise of religion. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

If the idea of spending the summer with your kids is daunting (or terrifying), the Times has some idea of how to entertain your kids. (Alexis Soloski for NY Times)

City Councilmember Donovan Richards is calling for the removal of NYPD officers from school security duties. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

The NYPD has vacated Carl Schurz Park after blocking access for no good reason. (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

The City Council passed the POST Act, which will require the NYPD to reveal information about their arsenal of surveillance tools, which include stingray devices, drones, facial recognition, and more. The mayor is expected to sign the bill into law. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

45 ice cream shops open for summer 2020. (Regan Miles for amNewYork Metro)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 17, 2020 – The “Don’t Believe What Cops Say” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Playgrounds will open with phase 2, the mayor finally gets a coronavirus test, the AG’s hearing on NYPD interactions during protests, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 74˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

You can watch the Public Hearing Via Video Conference on Police/Public Interactions During Recent Protests at that link at 11am on Wednesday.

Nine protesters detail their violent encounters with the NYPD. (Sydney Pereira, Jake Offenhartz, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Why the hell are NYPD cruisers playing ice cream man music? This isn’t an isolated incident and there is a video. (Luke Fater for Atlas Obscura)

The first wave of lawsuits against the NYPD has begun, with 18 notice of claims being lodged with City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The lesson from yesterday’s story about the NYPD poisoning that never was is clear: Stop believing the police. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

The moment is demanding it, but is the NYPD capable of reform? (Nate File for Bedford + Bowery)

A new policy mandates that body cam footage when the NYPD’s weapons are fired. I hope we’re all ready for a million reasons why cameras “malfunction.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 1.8 acre 50 Kent pop-up park will open on July 9 on a part-time basis from Thursday to Sunday from 10am to 6pm. (Greenpointers)

Mayor de Blasio announced that playgrounds will reopen in the city’s second phase of reopening. Yeah, it sucks, but we’re all fighting that same anxiousness in service of a greater good. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

It hasn’t been confirmed that we’ll be hitting phase 2 on June 22, and if we don’t, it’s because of assholes like Dani Zoldan on the Upper West Side, who has been running comedy shows inside Stand Up NY, the comedy club he owns. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Oh, look, more assholes. State Senator Simcha Felder, Assemblyman Simcha Eichenstein, and Councilman Kalman Yeger decided their community in Midwood has had enough of being careful and used a grinder to open the chains keeping the Kolbert Playground closed. (Lindsay Tuchman for NY1)

When CMJ announced it was coming back, a virtual festival wasn’t what we pictured. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The stoop is the new bar. And the new restaurant. And everything else too. (Marie Solis for Gothamist)

A look at Dennin Winser’s hand-painted signs, which he’s offering for free for Black-owned businesses. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Sometimes a headline is perfect. A gay socialist could be the first LGBTQ person of color in the New York legislature. Get to know Jabari Brisport. (Molly Sprayregen for LGBTQ Nation)

Ahead of the June 23 primary, Attorney General Letitia James opened a hotline for election issues. If you haven’t applied for an absentee ballot already, you’ll be voting in person. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city is providing free air conditioners for eligible households this summer. There are a few different guidelines to qualify and it’s best to check before it starts getting unreasonably warm. (East New York News)

Someone hung a noose inside Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem. The Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Should you sign a new lease right now? Rents look like they might be on the decline through the end of the year. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Kudos to the MTA for their creative social distancing decals on the subway. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped Cities)

We’ve all seen photos of the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, but have you thought about it represents? It’s meant to be a celebration the start of the Space Age, symbolize the theme of the 1964 World’s Fair “Peace Through Understanding” and also a part of Robert Moses’s plans for New York City. (Lillia Paynch for Untapped New York)

Juneteenth isn’t a recognized holiday in New York, but we could be on the road to changing that. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Photos: What Michelin-starred restaurant takeout looks like. (Gary He for Eater)

This year’s 4th of July hot dog eating championship will happen without a crowd and will be in a secret location, leaving this the first year in a long time without the competition at the corner of Surf and Stillwell. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The U.S. Open tennis tournament will also be held without a crowd this summer. I hope they fill the stands with stuffed animals and sex dolls like the Korean baseball teams have. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Hospitals and group homes can now accept visitors with their discretion. (Emily Davenport for Gothamist)

Housing courts in the state are starting to reopen, but there’s some confusion over if evictions are allowed to resume. With no additional guidance, Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks’s order from March halting evictions stands, but with pushback from eviction-hungry attorneys and landlords. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The state and city government is trying to get anyone who thinks they’ve been exposed to Covid-19 to get tested. If that’s the case, why were less than 100 prisoners tested over the first two weeks of June? (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Never trust the first thing Mayor de Blasio says. After taking a sick day on Monday and spreading the message that he didn’t feel there was a need to get tested… he got tested. Everything de Blasio says is a three-day story. Day One: Thing happens. day Two: Mayor says something stupid, ruining credibility. Day Three: Mayor backtracks, becomes joke. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A conversation with Judd Apatow about his new film “The King of Staten Island.” (Molly Given for amNewYork Metro)

The Briefly for May 13, 2020 – The “Social Distance Chicken is the Mascot We Need Right Now” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: When happens when “work from home” becomes “work,” the best Cuban sandwiches, how to do your brows at home, opening up Queens’ golf courses, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 59˚
Clear throughout the day.

Broadway will be closed through Labor Day, at least. It’s tough news but is necessary for ticket holders, who have had the fate of their summer ticket purchases up in the air for some time. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The “new normal” that everyone is talking about has one universal theme: a lot of new rules to follow. Greenmarkets could provide a glimpse into our future, as they’ve remained open throughout the pandemic. (Robin Raisfeld for Grub Street)

Remember haircuts? What’s a haircut gonna look like once salons and barbershops reopen? Here’s a peek into what we may be in for. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Good morning, and only good morning, to Greenpoint bar Magazine’s mascot, the Social Distance Chicken. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Between March 16 and May 10, the NYPD made 125 arrests that were related to the coronavirus, and 166 people, 93% of those arrested were people of color. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams doesn’t blame the NYPD for the racial discrepancy in arrests and summons, but Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio. Williams led a protest march in Manhattan on Monday, which the NYPD allowed to complete, despite first amendment rallies being momentarily banned. Williams’s point isn’t that the rules that are established are being arbitrarily enforced, but that the rules represent an undue burden on people of color? It’s such a ponderous argument to make that I assume I haven’t read the article right. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In a potentially unholy pairing, Uber is looking at eating GrubHub. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

City Council has modified a proposed emergency bill capping third-party food delivery fees for restaurants — raising the maximum fee from 10 percent to 20 percent, depending on how the restaurant uses the services, with a $1,000 fine per restaurant per day for non-compliance. Currently, delivery app companies charge upwards of 30%. (Erika Adams for Eater)

“If our employees are in a role and situation that enables them to work from home and they want to continue to do so forever, we will make that happen.” Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey laid out a future where working in the company’s Midtown South offices won’t be required for NYC employees. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Is putting thousands of people inside of one building a thing of the past? Facebook and Google have extended work-from-home through the end of the year. Chase is re-evaluating whether to send its 180,000 employees back to its NYC offices. If more companies follow where Twitter is going, get ready for Manhattan, with the country’s largest business district, to face a reckoning it’s never experienced before. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Impossibly adding a pop-up office to an 400-square-foot apartment, a miraculous feat by small-space connoisseur Rae Lambert. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Apartment Porn: For $13.5 million in Brooklyn Heights, you get two terraces, a garden, arched entrances, five beds, and seven baths. That’s enough room to display all your Beanie Babies and Trolls dolls. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

The best Cuban sandwiches available for takeout and delivery. (Florence Fabricant for NY Times)

A horrifying dive into how the Department of Education continually downplayed the threat of Covid-19 on the city’s children, including allowing large gatherings, withholding information, improperly cleaning, not contacting the Health Department if a teacher had tested positive and more. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Pedestrianize Queens’ gold courses is the out-of-the-box thinking that we need right now. Kudos to City Council Member Constantinides for proposing the idea. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Video: What’s the story with the 18-mile wire circling most of Manhattan? An investigation into Manhattan’s eruv. (Half as Interesting)

Mayor de Blasio signed the Dangerous Vehicle Abatement Program into law in February but has allocated zero dollars towards it, effectively killing the program. Since de Blasio signed the bill, over 700 drivers have received more than 15 speeding tickets each. The program would mandate training for drivers with fifteen or more speeding tickets or five or more red light tickets in a year. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Videos: Highlights of the Rise Up New York! COVID-19 benefit. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Video: Take a look back 110 years into what Coney Island was like in 1910 with this colorized video from the original Luna Park at its peak. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York City’s jail population has been reduced by 28% since March, only 8% have been rearrested, although an unnamed police official told Gothamist that 8% is a high number. There were several major crimes, but no murders. It’s hard to determine the real impact because the releases happened due to a change in the bail law and the coronavirus outbreak. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Video: Are ice cream trucks essential? The co-founder of Funtime Frostee makes his case. (Nilo Tabrizy, Ainara Tiefenthäler, and Noah Throop for NY Times)

Are your brows looking more like two caterpillars than you want them to? Tips form city’s salons on shaping and tweezing your own eyebrows. Desperate times call for desperate measures. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Once restaurants reopen, Mayor de Blasio said the city is open to the idea of allowing restaurants to use street space for seating to allow for more space for patrons. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York City has hired over 500 contact tracing staff and will be providing hotel rooms and support for the tracers as needed so they can remain as isolated as possible while completing their task. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Are you tired of the same options for takeout and delivery from the same places? A look at NYC restaurants with new takeout and delivery options. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Emma for today’s featured flower photo from Chelsea!