The Briefly for February 7-8, 2021 – The “$25 Billion Party No One Showed Up For” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Name a roach after your ex, leaping slush puddles, a dog friendly coffee shop, inside the MTA’s $8 billion federal request, and more

Today – Low: 16˚ High: 37˚
Snow (2–4 in.) until evening.

• Ahead of today’s snowstorm, outdoor dining is shut down. (Ron Lee for NY1)

• Here’s advice from an epidemiologist about what you should and shouldn’t do once you have the vaccine. Specifically, if you’re in a group of people in a private space who have all been vaccinated, can you relax? The answer is complicated. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

• Revel is expanding past scooters and will be installing a superhub for electric vehicles in Bed-Stuy. Each of the 30 chargers will provide 100 miles of charge in 20 minutes. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

• The MTA is asking Pete Buttigieg and the federal government for $8 billion in aid for 2021. The City breaks down how the $8 billion is broken out and what may be left behind form the MTA’s capital budget. (Jose Martinez The City)

• Looking at buying an apartment in the city? Here’s a little bit of a cheat sheet to answer the question how much should you put down to buy an apartment? (Ann Lien for StreetEasy)

• The city’s Economic Development Corporation, which is controlled by agreed to increase its financial support to operate NYC Ferry, Mayor de Blasio’s pet project, by up to $64 million. As stated in the article, “the funding move comes as ferry revenue is in decline, a fiscal crisis confronts the city and EDC contributions to the city budget are trending downward.” (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

The top 10 secrets of the Tenement Museum, including its history as a bar and the discovery of a mummified rat. (Untapped New York)

Wall Street has invoked the boogeyman, threatening to leave NYC. As the state is looking into a tax on the securities industry. Wall Street says this “could lead financial firms to move their back-office operations and related jobs outside of New York.” State Senator Julia Salazar proposed a tax that would net the state upwards of $29 billion annually. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

• Sippy Cafe is a new coffee shop, now open in Greenpoint, where you and your dog are both welcome. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

• With Valentine’s Day coming up, don’t miss your opportunity to be as spiteful as possible and name a roach at the Bronx Zoo after someone you used to love. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

• Video: Members of the Guardian Angels appeared to start a fight on the subway with participants of the weekly Stonewall Inn Trans Liberation march. The Guardian Angels have a history of harassing the city’s queer communities and their leader Curtis Sliwa announced his mayoral candidacy as a Republican for 2021. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• Governor Cuomo is considering changing his mind about indoor dining (again), this time maybe opening it up a day or two earlier than Valentine’s Day. It seems unnecessarily cruel to waver like this when restaurants need time to prepare to open their indoor spaces to the public. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

• In another reversal of state policy, the state will vaccinate 1.075 people over the age of 65 in Corrections Department custody. This change happened a few hours after the state was sued by inmates for access to the vaccine. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• The city is looking for a new operator for the Central Park ice rink and carousel after terminating its contracts with the Trump Organization. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

• Eric See, chef and owner of Ursula in Crown Heights, is launching a takeout series this month where six NYC-based queer chefs will take over the restaurant, each serving food that is essential to their personality. You can pre-order from each chef and a small supply will be reserved for walk-ins. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

• As much as I shit on Staten Island’s Republican House Representative Nicole Malliotakis in these emails, I will give her credit for being one of the eleven Repubicans with a spine who voted to strip Marjorie Taylor Greene of her committee posts. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

• The 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs get most of the love in NYC, but NYC also hosted the World’s Fair in 1853, which included “The Finest Building in America,” a crystal palace, built where Bryant Park is today. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

• An NYPD sergeant was sporting a “Make Enforcement Great Again” patch by protesters last week outside the 85th Precinct in Brooklyn. According to the NYPD, the officer has “received an initial discipline” but has not elaborated on what that discipline was. Members of the NYPD are not allowed to wear or say something that expresses personal political beliefs while on duty. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

• Who would have thought that no one wants to go to Hudson Yards during a pandemic. It’s like a $25 billion party that no one showed up for. (Matthew Haag and Dana Rubinstein for NY Times)

• Photos: Every New Yorkers’ favorite olympic activity the slush puddle avoidance leap. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

• Interview: Dianne Morales discusses her run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

What to know about the 2021 NYC City Council races. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

What does an NYC City Council member do? (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

15 exciting new restaurants in Brooklyn. (Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 31 – February 1, 2021 – The “Indoor Dining Returns to NYC” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The City Council works towards reforming the NYPD, Restaurant Week To Go is extended, the end of the renter’s market, Lunar New Year, & more

Today – Low: 26˚ High: 29˚
Snow overnight.

Due to Monday’s snow storm all Covid-19 vaccination appointments are being rescheduled, in-person classes are canceled, some food distribution and childcare programs are canceled, and the city’s Code Blue emergency cold weather plan is in effect. The National Weather Service is predicting 17 inches of snow with wind gusts up to 50 mph. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

An illustrated guide to what it’s like to give the Covid-19 vaccine. (Julia Rothman and Shaina Feinberg for NY Times)

Raise your hand if you’re surprised that white New Yorkers have received a disproportionate amount of vaccine doses. No hands? Just checking. (Sydney Pereira, Jake Dobkin, and Nsikan Akpan for Gothamist)

Believe it or not, hundreds of candidates for the June primaries are still required to collect signatures in-person, creating a democratically-mandated super spreader event. The state’s legislature put a bill together to lower the number of signatures required, which Governor Cuomo hasn’t signed yet. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Interview: Loree Sutton on running for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

Indoor dining will return to the city at 25% on Valentine’s Day. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

NYC Restaurant Week To Go was extended three additional weeks until February 28, overlapping past the re-opening of indoor dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The boogeyman of NYC is “if you do that, people will leave the city.” The latest person to invoke the boogeyman is Andrew Yang, saying if the city scraps its gifted programs, families will leave the city. Critics say the people with the ability to leave the city are middle-class white families and protecting the program is akin to protecting those families over others. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The City Council is one step closer to taking the NYPD out of traffic enforcement and investigating crashes, handing that off to the Department of Transportation. It’s part of the Council’s 12-part agenda which includes many other police reforms. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Included in the reform package: Ending qualified immunity for NYPD officers who commit misconduct, giving the City Commission on Human Rights the power to investigate police officers with a history of bigotry, Giving press credentialing to the Department of Citywide Administrative Services instead of the NYPD, Creating a new task force to handle mental health emergencies, and more. The reform package answers Governor Cuomo’s call to submit a plan for police reform before April 1 or risk losing state funds. (Christopher Robbins and Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

Always read the plaque. Like this one on Pearl Street marketing the site of the city’s first printing press. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

If you hated the “everything is cake” memes, Double Chicken Please on the Lower East Side is selling ice cream that looks just like a hot dog. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

I felt proud of myself after making a batch of chocolate chip cookies last night. Patrick LaMarca’s 4AM CANDY CO. is putting me to shame with these over the top, massive gourmet peanut butter cups available for order. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos and Video: The 75th anniversary of NYC’s World War II victory parade. (Abby Gweon for Untapped New York)

Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez vacated 262 warrants related to prostitution charges last week, stating he’s aiming to remove the negative consequences for individuals. There’s a much larger conversation to be had about prostitution in New York, but I haven’t seen an article that properly communicates the nuanced problems with the state’s latest efforts. Please feel free to send me links to educated arguments on this. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

If you’ve ventured out to Red Hook and looked behind the (former) Fairway Market, you’ll find a trolley car. Here’s a brief history of how that trolley got there and how it’s connected to the secret tunnel under Atlantic Ave, and the modern (failed) attempts at a Brooklyn-Queens trolley. (Brooklyn Eagle)

William Pepe, the MTA employee arrested in connection to the Capitol insurrection, has been connected to the Proud Boys by the federal government. Pepe continues to be suspended without pay from the MTA. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Who’s running for Queens borough president? Get yourself educated ahead of the June primary. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A federal judge is appointing a monitor to oversee the city’s special education complaint system, since the city has failed to live up to its side of a 2007 lawsuit requiring the education department to provide services or payments to families within 35 days of receiving a hearing officer’s order. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Get your leases signed now, because there are some early indicators that the renter’s market could be at an end. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

42 date spots with outdoor heat lamps. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Mets fans rejoice! The new owner of the Mets managed to not Mets things up when it came to the GameStop stock. There was a worry that Steve Cohen’s support of Melvin Capital would require him to take funds away form the team, a very Mets situation indeed. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Lunar New Year is on Friday. 7 restaurants with Lunar New Year specials. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 13-14, 2020 – The “Second Wave” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining shuts down on Monday, stay the night at FAO Schwarz, a Manhattan sushi delivery guide, Mayor de Blasio makes a threat, and more

Today – Low: 41˚ High: 60˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Tonight is the peak of the Geminid meteor shower for those in the darker areas of the city with “relaxed” eyes with up to 120 meteors per hour. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Rendering: A look at the giant apartment complex coming to Coney Island, complete with roof pool, in the old Gargiulo’s Restaurant parking lot of.

The Tompkins Square Park Holiday tree is lit. (EV Grieve)

The state’s pension fund will divest from many fossil fuels in the next five years and sell its shares in other companies that contribute to global warming by 2040. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Looking for an interesting place to spend a night in the city? You can Airbnb FAO Schwarz for a night. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here’s an explanation of the NYC Sheriff’s office, because if you’re confused about the distinction between the NYPD and the NYC Sheriff, I don’t blame you. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A guide to the Victorian mansions of Flatbush. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Two officers lied in paperwork and in court about their arrest of a Black Lives Matter protester in 2016. Manhattan DA Cy Vance’s office cleared them of perjery. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

Where to go ice skating in Brooklyn this winter. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

If you never stepped inside CBGB, this virtual version of the club from 2006 will be the closest you’ll ever get. Yes, it includes the bathrooms. (Alex at Flaming Pablum)

DCLA and Borough Arts Council funded artist and cultural organizations, venues, or institutions to be able to utilize public outdoor spaces for ticketed events and performances starting on March 1 thanks to a new Open Culture bill passed by the City Council. The maximum charge for a program will be $20. This will be the first ticketed live entertainment legally allowed in the city since March 2020. The Open Culture program is an extension of the Open Restaurants, Open Streets, and Open Storefronts programs. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’re feeling like you just have to get out of the city for good, may I suggest Topeka, Kansas, which will pay you $10,000 if you are a remote worker and move there. There are many cities that will pay you to move there. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Kathleen Casillo was charged with reckless endangerment after she drove her sedan into a crowd of ICE protesters in Murray Hill on Friday, sending six people to the hospital. Casillo says she panicked and hit the gas when protesters were banging on her car. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It seems New Yorkers got an early jump on buying Christmas trees this year. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

If you’ve had your usual Christmas plans canceled, this year presents a great opportunity to shake things up and join the Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count. Don’t lie, you’ve loved following this year’s bird news. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Max Rose, fresh off a defeat for Congress, filed paperwork to run for mayor. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The Google Doc of holiday light displays, that everyone could edit as they please, from Time Out has been updated into an interactive map. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Manhattan sushi delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)


The city is well beyond its thresholds for new hospitalizations, the 7-day average of new cases, and the 7-day rolling positivity average. “This is clearly a second wave in New York City” -Mayor de Blasio. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The governor has shut down indoor dining in the city (again) starting Monday the 14th, thanks to an increase in every single Covid-19 metric the state and city have established. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

Eight hospitals in the city have reached more than 90 percent fullness in their ICUs. Flushing Hospital in Queens is at over 100% capacity. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Only 1.4% of the state’s Covid-19 spread comes from restaurants and bars, but that number doesn’t specify between indoor and outdoor dining. 73.84% of COVID-19 cases spread through private gatherings. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The reactions from restaurant owners ranges from sad, but understanding, to absolutely delusional. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

“Anyone who thinks that their privilege puts them ahead of other people in greater need, that’s not going to happen in New York City.” -Mayor de Blasio. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

An ultra-Orthodox synagogue in Williamsburg seems to have broken social distancing rules for the last time. The mayor stated this week that the city will “move to shut down the building once and for all” after a funeral on Monday brought hundreds of people into the building with no masks. The article threads the needle between the recent Supreme Court case the state lost about religious gatherings and the rules that are still in place regardless of the lawsuit. But also this is a threat coming from Mayor de Blasio, who regularly ignores his own deadlines and threats. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Staten Island’s Mac’s Public House liquor license has been suspended, finally. It was one of 23 city businesses whose licenses were suspended last week. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Brooklyn Monarch is also on the list of businesses whose liquor licenses were suspended after city sheriffs broke up a party with nearly 400 people inside. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Congrats to Gravesend, which has the highest Covid-19 positivity rate in the city. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The city clarified when outdoor dining can remain open during snow and when snow removal is happening. When a Winter Operations Advisory is given, outdoor dining will stay open, but during a Snow Alert, outdoor dining will close. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

How scientists are tracking the flow of the city’s Covid-19 outbreak, using your poop. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

A day in the life of a contract tracer. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Find your public school’s Covid-19 testing rate online. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The New York City Board of Health passed a measure extending the order for total mask compliance at every school in the city, not just public schools for students, staff, and faculty. Yes, before this order, there was no enforcement of masks in non-public school buildings. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of Fortitude, the NYPL lion, dressed for the season, and the pandemic.