The Briefly for March 16, 2020 – The “A City Without Restaurants and Bars” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor shuts down schools, bars, restaurants, and venues, bike riding is up, the story of Typhoid Mary, a walk through Central Park, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 47˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Everything is being canceled and it sucks, but it’s also the right thing to do. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“States cannot build more hospitals, acquire ventilators or modify facilities quickly enough. At this point, our best hope is to utilize the Army Corps of Engineers to leverage its expertise, equipment and people power to retrofit and equip existing facilities — like military bases or college dormitories — to serve as temporary medical centers. Then we can designate existing hospital beds for the acutely ill.” -Governor Cuomo, making the case for the Army to step-in during this national natural disaster. (Governor Andrew Cuomo for NY Times)

The city will shut down bars and restaurants on Tuesday morning. Bars, restaurants, venues, and nightclubs will close completely for an undetermined amount of time. Think about where you would want to go to eat or drink and ask if they have gift certificates. Give them money now without physically going to those locations. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Seamless has deferred commissions from independent restaurants, but is that enough to actually help restaurants? (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The city’s schools are closed until April 20. That doesn’t mean there’s no school, as remote learning is set to start on March 23. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

Weed dealers are cleaning up now that everyone is staying home and freaking out. (Matthew Schneier for The Cut)

The Food Bank for NYC has a GoFundMe page for people who want to help, but don’t knowhow. (Food Bank of NYC)

How to talk to kids about COVID-19, from Dr. Rebecca Berry, PhD, an NYU professor who is an expert in child and adolescent psychiatry. (Isabelle Bousquette for New York Family)

Videos: Here’s how the MTA is cleaning the subways. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Jing Fong in Chinatown, the city’s largest Chinese food restaurant, is temporarily closed. With the CDC recommending limiting nationwide gatherings at 50 people, there isn’t much place for a restaurant that seats 800. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Record Store Day has been postponed from April 18 to June 20. Let’s all hope it doesn’t need another postponement. No one wants to have to wait that long for their Britney Spears – Oops!…I Did It Again (Remixes and B-Sides) vinyl (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

“For the most part when I talk to my colleagues they realize that, yeah, this has the potential to be really serious on a systems level. All in all though, I’d say there’s a calm acceptance about how crazy it’s going to be.” An interview with an ER doc. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Last week late-night shows had plans to continue without audiences, but as of this week, nearly all of them are off the air. The exceptions are the shows filmed in Los Angeles. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Utilities in New York have suspended power, heat, or water shut-offs through the end of April. (Samantha Maldonado and Marie J. French for Politico)

Airbnb is allowing coronavirus-related cancellations without penalty. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Welcome to the Park Slope Food Coop: a COVID-19 “petri dish.” (Matt Troutman for Patch)

So the event you had tickets to was canceled, what now? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s libraries are closed to you in person, but there is plenty to be done online. (Jennifer Schuessler for NY Times)

The headline is “how NYC restaurant workers are getting help so far,” but I’m not naive enough to say that the entirety of the city’s 325,000 workers is actually getting help. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Catholics have had their obligations to attend mass waived by Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio. (Robert Pozaryski for amNewYork Metro)

“This is a moment we all knew would come. That doesn’t make it any easier.” -Bill de Blasio on the first New Yorker to die due to COVID-19, an 82-year-old woman from Brooklyn. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

State Assemblymembers Charles Barron, who represents East New York, and Helene Weinstein, who represents Canarsie and Flatbush, were diagnosed with coronavirus Saturday. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Queens borough presidential election has been postponed from March 24, with a rescheduled date to be announced. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)


These YouTube walks through the city, like this one through Central Park, might be a good way to seem like you’re going outside without actually having to go outside. (ActionKid)

ICE has expanded its inhumane arrest patterns as part of Operation Noble Guardian and is now making arrests at JFK airport. (Maxx Katz for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Opera is dark but they’ll be offering free HD streams every night for a week starting on Monday night. (Jasmine Ting for Paper)

Meet Jacqueline VanDusen, who wants to bike every street in Brooklyn. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

This might have been a list of restaurants with openings in the spring. Now it’s a list of restaurants that might open sometime soon. (Eater)

Typhoid Mary, New Yorker. If you don’t know her story, this seems like the perfect time to read up on how isolation can prevent the spread of disease. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Want a distraction from COVID-19? How about bed bugs? What do you know about them? Do you know things? Let’s find out. (StreetEasy)

Black city residents are jailed on Rikers Island for alleged state parole violations 12 times more than whites, while Latinx people are accused of parole violations nearly four times more. Just some of the gems in a new report issued by Columbia Univerity’s Justice Lab on the New York state parole system. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

A look at New York’s former quarantine islands and hospitals. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How screwed up is our healthcare system? If you need further evidence beyond “look around,” New York hospitals sued their patients 31,000 in the last four years. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

The first signs of real spring, migrating birds, are here. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Do starter homes exist in NYC? (Localize.City)

A look at Edgar Allan Poe’s farmhouse on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Subway ridership is down 20%, but CitiBike riding is up 70%. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

RIP Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, avant-garde music legend and industrial pioneer. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

The Briefly for February 16, 2020 – The “Peanut Butter Bandit Needs to Be Caught” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Bernie Sanders gets the Bill de Blasio kiss of death, the cutest thing in the city, a 500% rent increase in Coney Island, the Amazon killer, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

What’s open and what’s closed on President’s Day. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Bernie Sanders campaign received the presidential kiss of death over the weekend: Bill de Blasio’s endorsement. De Blasio was, no doubt, looking for any excuse to leave NYC and jumped at the opportunity. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The subway is ubiquitious in the city, but at some point it needed to be built. The latest photo exhibition at the New York Transit Museum shows how the subway was built. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: For only $45 million, you can live like a Russian oligarch in the Plaza. The apartment used to be two separate apartments that were combined into one insane apartment covered in onyx and crystal. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Someone needs to stop the Peanut Butter Bandit. The worst person in the city hit the A train once more with the gooey atrocity on the poles of the train early Friday morning. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

He helped kill the Amazon HQ2 deal, and now he’s set his sights on making sure nothing like the Amazon deal ever happens again. Michael Gianaris wants to reform how the city gives tax breaks to giant companies. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s like a normal store, but it only sells flutes. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

JFK’s Terminal 4 will be getting a $3.8 billion makeover. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s 3:30 am on a Wednesday and you desperately want pierogis, where will you go? Behind the scenes at Veselka, the Ukrainian restaurant that’s been part of the East Village since the 50s. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Despite early reporting, Governor Cuomo and President Trump’s meeting about the ban on New Yorkers from the Truster Traveler Program and giving the government access to New York’s DMV records was “productive,” but no solution was reached. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Caroline Baumann didn’t resign as director of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum out of nowhere, she was forced out after an investigation into her wedding found she violated policy when it came to acquiring her dress and venue. The Smithsonian isn’t run by the government, but is partially funded by the government and has a similar conflict of interest policy. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

The ax is finally falling, all Barney’s stores will close at the end of the month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Only three restaurants in the city were closed last week by the Department of Health, but one of them is the city’s newest member of the 100+ point violation club. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The NYC condoms have a new wrapper, but here’s something that’s a little confusing: The name of the wrapper design is the “NYC Legend XL.” While it sounds like this is the magnum of free condoms, there’s no indication if this is for your average or not-so-average New Yorker (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man shot in the face by an ICE agent last week plans to sue the agency and is calling for an investigation of the incident. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Should the subway be free? According to City Councilmember Mark Treyger, the answer is yes. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Black Lives Matter President Anthony Beckford is the latest to stand up in support City Councimember Mark Treyger’s call to make transit free to use. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

He’s not alone. Meet the state’s assemblymember hopefuls who agree the fairest fare is no fare at all. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Meet Pancakes, the Staten Island Zoo’s brand newborn sloth, the cutest thing in the city. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The NYPD reportedly issued a subpoena to Twitter requesting access to the account of NY Post police bureau chief Tina Moore, citing the Patriot Act as their justification to try to find leaks within the department. The effort was lead by new police commissioner Dermot Shea. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s like a grocery store, but it’s an art installation where everything is made from plastic bags. The Plastic Bag Store, from Robin Frohardt, will be viewable in Times Square on March 1, coinciding with the state’s plastic bag ban. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A 14-year-old boy suspected of fatally stabbing a Tessa Majors to death in a Morningside Park robbery last December has been indicted on murder charges. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Rent increases are a part of life in the city, but a 500% rent increase is reprehensible. The Lola Star Gift Shop on the boardwalk in Coney Island faces a 500% increase in her rent from Luna Park and the company’s owner’s Zamperla. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

22 trendy restaurants you can still get into. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 11, 2020 – The “Brokers’ Fees Are Unbanned” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The subway mascot Cardvaark, the hottest restaurants in Queens, a sleepover at IKEA, the plastic bag ban, an Oreo slide, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.

Congrats to the Barclays Center subway stop, which has the city’s worst privately owned subway elevator functioning for only 74.2% of 2019, out of service for a total of three months of the year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Video: Go behind the scenes and back in time with this Metropolitan Museum of Art behind the scenes tour from 1928. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Remember when brokers’ fees were banned? Brokers’ fees have been unbanned, temporarily at least. The Real Estate Board of New York sued the state and the judge put a temporary restraining order on the rule. Snip snap. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hulu is taking over Rough Trade this weekend in an installation to promote the new Hulu version of High Fidelity. (Grant Lancaster for amNewyork Metro)

New York is the ninth most dangerous state for online dating, which takes into account internet crime rates and STI transmission rates. The safest site for online dating is Maine and the most dangerous is Alaska, which has the country’s highest man to woman ratio. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best bars on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aldea, which arrives a Michelin star, is closing on February 22. Chef George Mendes cites plans to “take a break, recharge creatively, and refocus,” with no other reason given for the closure. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Pizza Rat won Gothamist’s poll for the new subway mascot, but let’s not forget the subway’s previous mascot, Cardvaark, who looks like everyone’s least coolest cousin wearing a homemade Halloween outfit, who was supposed to help us all transition from tokens to MetroCards. Fun fact, the same person who brought us Cardvaark also brought us Poetry in Motion. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, so you’re moving from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Here are 19 answers to common questions. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

The NYPD is reporting 2019 saw the first rise in the number of Stop and Frisks since 2013, up 22% from 2018. An NYPD spokesperson, who must think that we’re all stupid, said that it’s “unlikely to be a true increase in stops but rather more accurate and complete reporting.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

With a history of racist and victim-blaming comments, does the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s Ed Mullins really speak for the actual NYPD? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

Take a deep breath in and release that tension in your body. The Yankees have reported for spring training, which means actual spring is coming. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Everything you need to know about NYC’s citywide ferry. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban, which kicks into gear in less than three weeks. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Manhattan’s community boards are older than the borough’s population, homeowners hold a disproportionately high number of seats and Hispanic people are underrepresented. Not a great representation. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Ann Choi for The City)

Oreo is building a giant inflatable slide in Herald Square that will open February 21st, so when you’re in Herald Square and your friends see the slide and ask what it is, you can look effortlessly cool by telling them “Oreo put it up.” (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted to sleep in the Red Hook IKEA, here’s your chance. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

After an ICE agent shot Eric Diaz in the face, it’s time to ask if New York City really a sanctuary city? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

The Reckless Driver Accountability Act will require drivers who rack up five red light tickets or 15 school speed zone violations within a one year period to take a safe driving course or they’ll lose their car until they do. The bill is expected to pass City Council this week. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Cupid’s Undie Run, kind of like a street version of the No Pants Subway Ride but for charity, hit the streets last weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Video: ‘Commute’ by Scott Lazer is a beautiful film, shot on 16mm, even if it’s focused on Penn Station in rush hour. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

1 Dot = 1 Person. Explore how racially divided the city is using 2010 census data. (Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service)

Feds to the Hudson River rail tunnel: Drop Dead. (Ryan Hutchins for Politico)

Another day, another water main break. This time the water main on South Street near Pike Slio broke, flooding the area. (Bowery Boogie)

R40, La Rotisserie du Coin, La Mian Lounge join the hottest restaurants in Queens.

Featured photo sent in from reader @mfireup