The Briefly for April 24, 2019 – The “14th Street Will Be Closed to Cars” Edition

“Grab a cop’s taser” is still a bad idea, the 14th St bike lanes will be permanent, Shirley Chisholm’s statue design was unveiled, the Charging Bull’s balls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The design for the Shirley Chisholm statue at Prospect Park has been selected. Artists Amanda Williams and Olalekan Jeyifous’s design is the first of five She Built NYC monuments announced. (Women.nyc)

Finally, some decision about 14th St during the L Train Slowdown. Starting in June, 14th St will be closed to traffic from 3rd Ave to 9th Ave. In addition to 14h St, the bike lanes on 12th and 13th will be made permanent. Maybe this is in hopes of softening the blow of just how rough it will get for commuters. The MTA is already warning that even if you allocate extra time to your journey on the L train once the Slowdown takes hold, you probably won’t make it on the first train anyway. (amNY)

Federal immigration trial attorneys refuse make the 1.1 mile trip between Federal Plaza and the new immigration courtrooms on Varick St and are choosing to appear via video conference instead. (Gothamist)

Cardinal Timothy Dolan announced an affordable housing portfolio with 866 apartments across six developments in the city. (Bronx Times)

There are bad ideas and then there are “grab a cop’s taser and zap three NYPD officers” bad ideas. (Gothamist)

Over fifteen years since it was set up, the makeshift memorial for 9/11 victims in the Union Square subway station is beginning to show its age. (Untapped Cities)

It’s shocking just how bad the city’s procedures can be for the people affected by lead paint. Local Law One was the city’s promise to end lead poisoning by 2010. Even with a spotlight shone by WNYC/Gothamist, the city’s Housing Preservation and Development failed the city’s residents while their children are poisoned by their homes. (Gothamist)

Two NYPD officers are being investigated for the police’s response to the horrific ax murder and attempted murder in the Bushwick Houses. (amNY)

If laying in the sun under JFK’s busiest runways, the TWA Hotel’s pool and observation deck are right up your alley. (6sqft)

A love letter to the MTA’s R-46 subway cars, the ones with a faux wood interior, orange and yellow seats, and have been in service since the mid-70s. (Gothamist)

Those newly $3.00 expensive MetroCards could win you an all-expenses-paid vacation to Hawaii if you buy one of the quarter million qualifying cards at specific subway stations. Once you have a card, you have to remember to register it online and a single winner will be chosen next month. Good luck. (Gothamist)

The SummerStage lineup was announced. (Time Out)

59% of New Yorkers support having a homeless shelter in their neighborhood. It seems the NIMBY opposition to shelters appears to be the minority. (Patch)

Watch this hypnotic animation showing how the L trains will operate during the Slowdown. (@NYCTSubway)

NYC’s recycling program’s mascots finally have names and OH MY GOD WHAT ARE THOSE THINGS. (amNY)

Planned Parenthood of New York City’s Project Street Beat is bringing a mobile health center which will offer HIV testing, overdose prevention, counseling, and other services in an attempt to expand coverage to marginalized communities. (amNY)

Two new ax-throwing bars are coming to Brooklyn. Just when you thought Brooklyn couldn’t get more Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

The average commute to work in the city is 43 minutes, the longest of any large American city. Just another way to show that NYC is #1. Only 4% of New Yorkers can get to work within 30 minutes. (Patch)

Go to Bowling Green and you’ll see two lines of people waiting to take photos at the Charging Bull. One by the bull’s head and the longer line are of people looking to snap a photo of themselves rubbing its balls. Why? (Atlas Obscura)

Shanghai has its own Charging Bull, but in contrast, no one is rubbing its balls. (Business Insider)

The five best cakes in the city.

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The Briefly for February 22, 2019 – The “Our City’s Parks Are No Longer Rocking” Edition

The 7 train is literally falling apart, the mayor announces a plan to fight placard abuse, the BQX takes another hit, the YMCA, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Nearly every subway line has closures this weekend. (6sqft)

The 7 train is falling apart, literally. A piece of the train tracks fell from its elevated track and impaled an SUV through its windshield. The driver wasn’t injured, but holy shit, is anywhere near the subway safe anymore? (Curbed)

Why we rent and not buy our homes. (StreetEasy)

The mayor announced a goal of moving the parking placard system to license plates from the laminated placards on dashboards. Unless the NYPD enforces the rules, this whole thing is pointless. (Politico)

The NYPD used to hand out hundreds of summonses for sex in the city’s public parks. Last year? Zero. Are New Yorkers no longer horny on main? (NY Times)

The mayor promised serious consequences if yeshivas continue to bar Department of Education inspectors from their buildings. The deadline passed and the city is still negotiating with the schools. (Gothamist)

A map of the mega projects changing the city. (Curbed)

A look inside the new Webster Hall, but no photos of the new bathrooms. (NY Times)

Webster Hall will reopen on May 1 with Patti Smith. (Time Out)

Two more suspects were arrested in connection to the MS-13 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue subway shooting. (NY Post)

The best parodies are barely noticeable, which means you could miss these amazing MTA parody ads if you don’t have a sharp eye. (Bklyner)

Brooklyn President Eric Adams is urging New Yorkers to join their Neighborhood Advisory Boards in order to distribute Community Service Block Grants, a program which dates back to Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The capital of President Trump’s immigration crackdown is New York City with an 88.2% increase in arrests. (Patch)

A list of the 47 hate groups active and operating in the city, double the number from ten years ago. (Patch)

What the hell is the NYPD doing blasting a hip-hop diss track outside the Marcus Garvey Village? A spokesperson said the officers “used it as a way to start a conversation with young men on the street.” Right. (Gothamist)

An 8-month-old in a stroller rolled onto the tracks of the 72nd Street 1 train. Her father jumped onto the tracks and brought her back to safety. The baby went to the hospital with a bump on her head. (amNY)

What’s special about the McBurney Y in Chelsea? Have you ever spelled out “Y.M.C.A.” at a wedding? (Gothamist)

Despite no one wanting him to run, Mayor de Blasio continues to flirt with a presidential run with a trip to Iowa this weekend. (NY Post)

The AARP supports congestion pricing, undercutting critics who say seniors will be hurt by the tolls. (Streetsblog)

Joe Crowley, defeated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is also leaving his position as head of the Queens Democratic Party. June Bunch will serve as the interim chair until a new leader is selected. (NY Post)

Nomkiki Konst, the TV-pundit-turned-candidate for Public Advocate, gets the profile treatment from Politico. (Politico)

If you’ve got three and a half hours to kill, here are 15 minutes interviews with 14 of the city’s Public Advocate candidates. (Gotham Gazette)

Ten candidates for Public Advocate on congestion pricing, safety, transportation policy, bike lanes, and the job in general. (Streetsblog)

An Amazon-less city might be the death-blow to the BQX streetcar. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Just in time for the weekend, 12 hot new brunch places. (Eater)

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The Briefly for September 19, 2018 – Flood Rat is the New Pizza Rat

Flood rat, over 100 city school bus drivers had no background checks, protests over ritualistic killing of chickens in the streets, and more

Forget Pizza Rat, Flood Rat is our new mayor.

The ritualistic slaughter of chickens in Crown Heights by the Orthodox Jewish community was met with protest from people believe that swinging a live chicken over your head and then beheading it is cruel. Roughly 50,000 chickens are killed in ad-hoc slaughter houses throughout Crown Heights, Williamsburg, and Borough Park and in the past those animals have ended up in the garbage.

The city’s ubiquitous temporary construction fences are going to get a makeover. The Department of Cultural Affairs launched a pilot program calling for artwork to live on temporary fencing. You can apply through October 12.

$4.1 million is being set aside by the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs to provide legal assistance for unaccompanied and separated migrant children who are still in New York.

The new Museum of Street Art pays tribute to 5 Pointz, and it’s in the stairwells at the citizenM hotel. The curator is the former 5 Pointz spokeswoman Marie Flageul.

We’re all aware the subway doesn’t know how to handle heavy rain, but these videos compiled by the NY Post shows just how screwed the subways were during the remnants of Hurricane Florence.

19 stand-out restaurants and bars in Red Hook, from Eater.

Are Bill de Blasio and Andrew Cuomo ready to hug it out? The mayor spoke at a Democrat rally on Tuesday and while he didn’t verbally endorse Cuomo for Governor, his spokesman says his speech was an endorsement.

The city gave out 21 million condoms in the year ending June 30, down from 35 million the previous year. The de Blasio administration is blaming the difference on a decrease of federal funding towards traditional safe sex products.

The impact of Schneps Communications purchasing CNG (the local news publication consolidation reported on last week) is less reporters covering certain neighborhoods in the city.

Four men who were repeatedly sexually abused as children by a religion teacher at a Catholic church in Brooklyn received a $27.5 million settlement from the Diocese of Brooklyn in one of the largest settlements ever awarded to individual victims of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church.

The DOE is investigated allegations that more than 100 people were approved to work as city school-bus drivers without any background checks.

Do you know about the ramp in Forest Hills? Atlas Obscura tells the story about the meeting place of The Ramones before they were The Ramones, which now bears a mural of the iconic band by Ori Carino.

Meet the v good dogs that protect Amtrak at Penn Station.


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