The Briefly for May 20, 2020 – The “What to Do if You Find a Baby Bird” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Long Island beaches shut out city residents, Peter Luger’s opens for delivery, delivery by drag queens, Magnolia and the MTA start using UVC lights, & more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 63˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

After cancelation, reinstatement, appeal, and a rejection the June 23 presidential primary is officially back. This means an additional 615 in-person poll sites, 22 early voting poll sites, and 4,617 poll workers will be required. This is also a reminder that you can and should vote absentee this year. Here’s how. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Chrysler Building applied to the Landmarks Preservation Commission to add an observation deck on the 61st floor. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

177,700 students will be attending virtual summer school this year. It’s been a tough year for students, so comparing this year’s numbers to any year in the past is not an apples-to-apples comparison, but this is the highest number of students in history. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What to do if you find a baby bird. Hint: its parents won’t smell you on them. (Beth Skwarecki for Lifehacker)

“My fingernails are breaking, I’ve got hangnails, I’ve been getting my nails done for 14 years … I’m very much into yoga, I can’t go to my Bikram yoga studios, I can’t go get my eyelashes done, I can’t go and socialize with the people that are my friends. It’s led me to depression, it’s made me not feel sexual — I mean it’s awful.” This is a real quote from someone protesting outside a barbershop in Williamsburg, but the protestors were sparse mostly from out of state. If you’re looking for a barbershop to avoid, it’s the Beard Barberia Cut and Shave on the corner of Grand Street, who organized the protest (which drew six!!! people) with the pro-Trump group Liberate America, whose organizer was arrested in 2017 for allegedly jerking off in the back seat of an Uber in CA. (Kevin Dugan for Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s virtual pride celebration’s grand marshals are the Ali Forney Center, Dan Levy, showrunner and star of “Schitt’s Creek,” Yanzi Peng, executive director of LGBT Rights China, and Victoria Cruz, a queer rights activist. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

The mayor announced the city’s heatwave plan, which includes air conditioners for NYCHA and low-income homes, electricity subsidies, misting oases in parks, and open fire hydrants on certain blocks. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Nearly 70% of offices were open concept, what will offices look like when they reopen? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Have you been in a car around the city lately? It’s very weird. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

It’s amazing what a bit of yarn on a fence can do to lift your spirits. A look at the yarn bombing in East Harlem. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Momofuku announced that Ssäm Bar will be moving from the East Village to the Wayō space in Manhattan’s Seaport District. David Chang’s restaurants have chosen increasingly more touristy areas for its restaurants since Trump-supporting billionaire Stephen Ross came on board in 2016. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Peter Luger is offering take-out and delivery for the first time ever. If you’ve been clamoring for food from the restaurants that recently received a zero-star rating from NY Times’s Pete Wells, here’s your chance. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Today (Wednesday) is the Naming The Lost: A 24 Hour COVID Vigil, a 24-hour virtual vigil that starts at 2 pm to provide an opportunity for collective mourning as the number of deaths reaches for 100,000. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio will press the state to approve line-of-duty benefits for families of city workers killed by the coronavirus. The mayor wants the benefits to expand beyond first responders, which is the current limit of federal legislation. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

A weekend project: make Shake Shack’s cheese sauce at home. (Claire Lower for Lifehacker)

Nine hospitals in the city are about to begin allowing visitors again in a test program as Covid-19 is showing signs of abatement. There will be restrictions, but to those who have been in the hospital during this pandemic, I’m sure that any friendly face would be a welcome one. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Five of the most cringe-worthy excerpts from President Trump’s talk with NYC restaurant owners. Thomas Keller from Per Se is kissing the president’s ass so hard these moments he should be embarrassed. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Fresco’s Cantina in Astoria is putting a new spin on delivery with its new “DRAG-livery” service, which involves sending drag queens out to deliver food and perform. The service is an additional $15 on top of a food order. (NY1)

A look at David Bowie’s favorite NYC sandwiches. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Magnolia Bakery’s locations on the Upper West Side and in the West Village are experimenting with new ultraviolet lights that supposedly kill airborne virus particles as people enter the bakery. The light will be in addition to every other protective measure that has been put in place. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Magnolia isn’t the only one getting in on UV lights, the MTA announced it is launching a three-week pilot program using UVC lights, which has been used to disinfect buses in Shanghai. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If your plan was to hear out to Long Island this weekend because the city’s beaches will be closed, tough shit because Long Island’s beaches will be off-limits to city residents. (Marcus Navarro for Politico)

Taste Of Persia, the Persian restaurant once inside a pizza place in Flatiron, is reopening as a delivery-only business. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Why hasn’t Dr. Oxiris Barbot been at the forefront of the city’s communication with the public? The root of the problem seems to be the mayor, who has had a tense history with his Health Department. (J. David Goodman and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to find NYC’s best bread delivery right now. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

NYU is planning on allowing students back on campus for the fall semester. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

13% of the city’s nearly 10,000 corrections officers have caught Covid-19. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

Being a fan of the Knicks is fun because every year the Knicks try something new or hire new people and still manage to produce the same garbage results. The Knicks’ latest move is hiring Frank Zanin as an assistant general manager. The Knicks are 67-163 under their current general manager, so Zanin has a tough road ahead of him whenever the NBA starts up again. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Health inspectors are two months into a hiatus on examining local restaurants still open for takeout during the coronavirus pandemic. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Where to get Chinese takeout and delivery. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Emma for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 18, 2020 – The “Bored Enough to Give Yourself a Tattoo?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The entire city will take a huge financial hit in 2020, except the NYPD, the late-night delivery guide, the Williams Pipeline is dead, baby bears, and more

Today – Low: 55˚ High: 68˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, hitting only 3 of the 7 metrics necessary to start phase one of reopening.

There will be no city beaches open for Memorial Day weekend. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

As New York state is losing billions of dollars, politicians are turning their eyes towards a source of revenue they’ve failed to pull the trigger on for years: legal marijuana. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Watch Andean Bear cubs Brienne and Benny explore their habitat in the Queens Zoo for the first time. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

How bored are you at home? Are you ready to do your own stick and poke tattoo? (Dani Blum for NY Times)

Will the Covid-19 pandemic mean the end of the walk-in tattoo appointment? When the city’s tattoo shops reopen, there’s a chance. What will all the tattoo parlors do with their very clever Christopher Walken-related signs? (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The city’s park conservancies are expecting a massive financial hit this year, forcing them to drastically alter their organizations, including a reduction of over 350,000 hours of work, a half-million trees not being planted, an 80% reduction of park improvements, with up to a 68% loss of income in the worst case. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Governor Cuomo warned that without the HEROES Act, there would be devastating cuts to the budgets of education and medical programs, as well as local governments. (Robert Pzarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The NYC Ferry system is looking at a 20% reduction on top of the 30% reduction in service, with an intent to save the city up to $10 million. In addition, new ferry locations are being pushed back to 2021. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city is no different. The $10 billion shortfall will impact pretty much everything the city offers, like canceling the youth employment program, freezing new teacher hires, and killing environmental initiatives. As crime is at historic lows, the NYPD is not poised to take much of a financial hit at all, as de Blasio’s administration prioritizes policing its citizens over helping them. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This is the same NYPD that was incapable of enforcing social distancing without immediately reminding us all about its racist enforcement of stop-and-frisk as officers beat and pummeled people of color all across the city while glad-handing white people in parks. The NYPD has shown us the Peter Principle up close, as the mayor has reduced their role in enforcing social distancing because they can’t be trusted to treat all New Yorkers like people. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

This is the same NYPD that can’t be bothered to actually execute the city’s open streets plans while its people are desperate for space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The NYPD won’t even be fully in charge of the city’s plans to limit access to portions of parks to prevent overcrowding. A portion of the work will be going to the city’s 2,260 new “social distancing ambassadors.” (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewyork Metro)

Jadakiss donated 250 pizzas to medicals centers throughout in the Bronx, Harlem, and Yonkers as part of the Pizza vs. Pandemic initiative. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The Times rides-along with the subway shutdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Photos from the inside of the 30th Street Men’s Shelter on First Avenue in Manhattan show people in close quarters sleeping on stairs and in hallways, proving the city is failing its population of homeless New Yorkers. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

The city’s response to the photos was to put more homeless New Yorkers into hotel rooms but has been pairing them up, which seems counterproductive if you’re trying to prevent the spread of Covid-19. The City Council is preparing a bill that would require hotel rooms used as an alternative to shelters to be single occupancy. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

WNYC and Gothamistreceived an $8.9 million Paycheck Protection Program loan from the federal government to help the $10 million deficit it was projecting, saving many journalism jobs. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

VICE, owned by Refinery29, announced its laying off 155 employees. There is local support to add financial support for digital media in the HEROES Act in Congress, but I can’t fathom a world where the Trump administration does anything to actually help journalists. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

An analysis puts the number of people who fled the city between Match and May at 420,000. In some neighborhoods like the Upper East Side, the West Village, SoHo, and Brooklyn Heights, the population has decreased by up to 40%. It should be no surprise that the more wealthy someone is, the most likely they were to abandon New York City. (Kevin Quealy for NY Times)

The New York Department of Environmental Conservation denied a permit necessary for the construction of the Williams Pipeline, essentially killing the fracked gas pipeline that would have terminated in the Rockaways and was at the center of National Grid’s refusal of service to new customers at the end of last year. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Someone is trying to plan a drive-in festival in “Yankee Stadium’s parking lot,” including live music, movies, games, etc. Take a moment and open up a map app or website and take a look at Yankee Stadium. Try to find “the parking lot.” Yankee Stadium doesn’t actually have a large parking lot. There are parking garages and a few dirt lots that double as parking when there are games, but there isn’t one large parking lot near the stadium like there is at Citi Field where you would think an elevated stage would let anyone see a performance. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Notify NYC sent out a mass text on Saturday saying there’s an “alarming shortage of donated blood.” The FDA amended its homophobic rule about not accepting blood donations from gay or bisexual men (but still won’t accept blood from a man who has had sexual contact with another man in the last three months) but the New York Blood Center says it can’t adopt those changes until June. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

The signs for Gem Spa came down over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

“You could feel it going through your veins and it was almost like someone injected you with straight-up fire.” The new syndrome linked to Covid-19 that is impacting kids sounds like actual hell. (Pan Belluck for NY Times)

New York children of color may be more vulnerable to the toxic shock-like syndrome linked to new coronavirus, according to demographic data released by City Hall. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city closed the field hospital at the Billie Jean King Tennis Center, which housed 79 patients, the last of whom left the hospital on Saturday. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

The late-night delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured flower photo from Grand Army Plaza in Central Park.

The Briefly for May 7, 2020 – The “Playing Governor Cuomo BINGO” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Nets go back on their promise to pay arena workers, the NY presidential primary is back on, a $20 million UES mansion, and more

Today – Low: 49˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

There are 64 potential cases of children in New York with a mysterious inflammatory disease associated with COVID-19. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Photos: The first night of the subway lockdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

“Being a bus driver at 1 a.m., you’re already on edge.” With overnight subway service suspended, bus operators are concerned more unruly passengers will be coming their way. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Let’s play Governor Cuomo press briefing BINGO. (Jen Carlson and Sarah Butler for Gothamist)

The New York Democratic presidential primary is back on for June 23, thanks to a ruling by US District Judge Analisa Torres. The ruling is in response to Andrew Yang’s lawsuit. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

John Bonizio, the owner of Metro Optics in the Bronx, has continued to pay all 56 of his employees through the closure of all their stores. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Despite a promise to pay its workers while the NBA is on indefinite hold, but at least 15 workers have not been paid. Joe Tsai, the owner of the Nets, is worth $10.6 billion. (Andy Hirschfeld for Observer)

There are people who will never ride the Cyclone because they will say it’s not safe, so it’s hard to imagine what Coney Island could do to make people feel safe and still open this season, but they’re getting ready with the hopes they’re allowed to celebrate July 4th with the city. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

While the coronavirus has drastically changed many components of American life, the age-old issue of racial disparities in law enforcement has once again come to the fore, thanks to the NYPD. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

10 great seafood dishes still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The mayor has been shit-talking the federal government all week but spent Wednesday saying that without a stimulus for the city, city workers will face furloughs and layoffs. The mayor would not get into specifics, ensuring the highest amount of stress possible for all city workers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

In an attempt to widen the state’s Covid-19 testing, there is some unsubstantiated reporting that 3,000 grocery stores will become testing locations. Get some blood testing done while you pick up some more yeast. (Emmo Orlow for Time Out)

“It was a cascade. And, by the way, I fully endorse it. But, literally, our income went to zero.” Inside the ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ broadway show as it went from night three of previews to indefinite hiatus. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

It’s been chilly after last weekend’s great weather. Where to order something when you’re in the mood for a bowl of something warm. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. dropped charges in a major construction fraud case this week. But he’s not blaming allegations of prosecutorial misconduct — he’s blaming Covid-19. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Can a fast food restaurant be considered a NYC treasure? The answer is yes if you’re talking about Roll N Roaster, which has reached legendary status amongst New Yorkers. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

As the months tick by, we’re going to see more places go from closed indefinitely to closed permanently. The latest to be added to the permanent list is Daddy-O in the West Village. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A soup kitchen run by the Coalition for the Homeless is seeing a 50% spike in demand since Covid-19 broke out. (Jacqueline Baylon and Claire Molloy for Business Insider)

“I’ve loved producing MUG for the past 28 years, but with things being the way they are, I’m closing MUG today, with a heavy heart for the city I love.” Manhattan User’s Guide, an invaluable resource run by Charlie Suisman has ended its 28-year run. Charlie has a new novel out called Arnold Falls. (Manhattan User’s Guide)

Today marks the next set of streets to close to vehicles and open to pedestrians and cyclists. How many miles of open streets will be added today? Two, bringing the total mileage to 9. The city has a goal of 100 miles by the end of the month. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Apartment Porn: A $20 million mansion on the Upper East Side with multiple fireplaces, a roof deck with a hot tub, a garden, a Juliet balcony, a circular skylight, and just steps from Central Park. If $20 million is too much, you can rent it for $85,000/month. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It turns out that storing dead bodies in a UHaul truck on Utica Avenue isn’t a crime, it’s disgusting, but not a crime. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

12 affordable NYC dining options for takeout and delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

thanks to reader Madeline for today’s featured photo!