The Briefly for May 15, 2019 – The “Carlos Danger Is At Large” Edition

A Queens city councilmember admits to sexual harassment and keeps his job, answering Broadway’s mysteries, Pride by the numbers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to Trump Tower, one of NYC’s least desirable luxury buildings. (Bloomberg)

The expanded Statue of Liberty museum is opening on Thursday featuring the original torch and other artifacts and exhibits highlighting the statue, island, and history. Only 20% of the people who step foot on the island visit the current museum. (amNY)

Amnesty International U.S.A. was set to sign a new lease at 88 Pine St until the new landlord said no. That landlord? The Chinese Government. (The Real Deal)

NYC Pride by the numbers on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots. (amNY)

Carlos Danger is at large after serving 18-months in prison for sexting with a minor. (NY Times)

Uh oh. This is the start of talk of a subway strike. (NY Times)

Six historic LGBTQ sites may become NYC landmarks. (6sqft)

The trial of NYPD’s Daniel Pantaleo, accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal choke, continued with Pantaleo’s lawyer blaming Eric Garner’s death on Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

Can a chef who’s earned a two-star Michelin rating change school lunches for the better? (NY Times)

A wine and artisanal food festival at Industry City was interrupted by anti-rezoning protest, specifically aimed at the commercialization of the industrial sector. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci is bringing his masterpiece St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Time Out)

Council Member Barry Grodenchik has resigned as chair of the Committee on Parks and Recreation after admitting to paying improper attention to a Council staff member, including blowing a kiss to her across a table at a meeting. Gross. (Politico)

Don’t worry, he is “deeply sorry,” and he will not be losing his job on the City Council. (Gothamist)

There was a worry that if New Jersey passed marijuana legalization that New York would have to follow quickly. New Jersey legalized electric bikes and scooters, maybe this will be the kick in the pants that New York finally needs? (Streetsblog)

Photos from inside the Whitney’s Biennial. If you make your way to the Whitney, expect protests against board member Warren Kanders, who has ties to a manufacturer of tear gas canisters used against asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border. (Gothamist)

Rockaway Beach will be fully open this summer after a $10.7 million renovation to prevent catastrophic erosion. 348,000 cubic yards of sand were added to the beach. (Curbed)

Meet Liz Thomas, the professional long-distance hiker who is about to set out on a 175-mile, 100+ park, five borough hike across NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve seen groups of people camping near Central Park for a week, it’s not a protest or a performance art piece or anything like that. BTS is coming to Summerstage. (Gothamist)

The best parks for outdoor grilling. (amNY)

Are Summer Fridays a New York thing, or does it exist everywhere? (StreetEasy)

Today is the first hearing for the proposed fur ban, which pits activists against the fur industry. If New York enacts the ban, it would be following in the footsteps of San Francisco and Los Angeles. (amNY)

Video: A tour of the most expensive neighborhood in New York City. Take a guess on what you think it is before clicking. (Eric Conover)

Congrats! NYC is one of the worst places in the country to try and start a career. (Patch)

Congratulations to City Councilmember-elect Farah Louis on her victory in the special election to fill the vacant 45th City Council district seat. Louis received 41.81% of the vote, which was enough to win. (Kings County Politics)

Answers to the six biggest questions asked on Broadway each night. (NY Times)

The Wednesday Walk: “A Saturday afternoon circuit for some fatty food, but also when you want to seem a little cultured” (GoRoam)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 17, 2019 – The “L Project Will Take Train Service From Suck to Blow” Edition

Amazon passed over Industry City before leaving Long Island City, the best bars in Nolita and Soho, Rosé Mansion returns this summer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Long before Amazon decided not to build a headquarters in Long Island City, they decided not to build at Industry City. The details came out thanks to a Freedom of Information Law request and shows just how far the developers were willing to go to become Amazon City ahead of their billion dollar rezoning request. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about what’s open and what’s closed on Good Friday, Passover and Easter across the city. (Patch)

Here is the subway map and schedule for the L Project, which starts on April 26 and will take the trains service from suck to blow for the foreseeable future. (Gothamist)

Congratulations to the Bed-Stuy chess team for winning second place in the All-Girls National Chess Championship in Chicago last weekend. (Patch)

Squibb Bridge, the pedestrian bridge connecting Brooklyn Bridge Park and Brooklyn Heights will be demolished and rebuilt after opening in only 2013. The BQE Rehab won’t interfere with the bridge, meaning work can get started faster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If Skynet ever becomes a reality, you can rest assured that the city’s government won’t play a hand in its creation. The mayor’s artificial intelligence task force has met 20 times in the last year and has accomplished, as far as reporting has shown, absolutely nothing but infighting and typical government inefficiencies. Like many of the mayor’s projects, there was no explicitly stated goals or scope to the work they are expected to achieve. (Curbed)

Close your eyes and picture a variety show in Bushwick. Good. Now turn up the saturation and volume past the point of being polite. If you’ve got a wild enough imagination, you’ve pictured something close to Eric Schmalenberger’s Blunderland Variety Show in its seventh year. (Bushwick Daily)

Hold on to your Instagram accounts, Rosé Mansion is returning this summer. (amNY)

In “nowhere is safe” news, the Fifth Avenue Apple Store has had a supposed month-long bed bug infestation. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s revamped plans for a completely new system of bus routes is still coming, but much like a city bus, it’s going to arrive later than you want it to. NYC Transit plans to finalize a plan by April 2020. (QNS)

The Lyrid meteor shower will hit its peak on April 22 and 23 and will happen from the 16th to 25th. Take a look upwards at night, you may see some shooting stars. (Patch)

New Jersey politicians think congestion pricing unfairly targets New Jerseyians. Maybe they’ve forgotten the point of congestion pricing is first and foremost to reduce the number of cars driving into Manhattan. (NY Times)

Buckets Of Xanax, no really we’re talking about literal hundreds of thousands of pills in buckets, were seized in a dark web raid that was using Manhattan businesses as return addresses. (Patch)

SPIN’s new ping pong lounge launches next week. The ping pong is free, but how’s the food? (Time Out)

The mayor, unlike some other politicians, has already released his 2018 taxes. Nothing terribly exciting, but he gets credit for doing it. (Politico)

Jumaane Williams, who is both the city’s public advocate and also captain obvious, said that the Hudson Yards is “not for a majority of this city.” (amNY)

The state’s legislature is pushing forward with a bill that would ban religious exemptions for the measles-vaccine for any child attending schools in New York state. Rockland County’s outbreak has infected 186 and Brooklyn’s has infected 259. The World Health Organization labeled measles as one of the 10 largest threats to global health in 2019. (Downtown Express)

An interview with Dr. Jan Kaminsky, Director of Education at Rainbow Health Consulting, and is also developing a National LGBTQ+ Nurses Association. (Gothamist)

The best bars in Soho and Nolita. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 1, 2019 – The “Congestion Pricing is Not An April Fools Joke” Edition

Participatory budgeting is here, a look at the state’s budget, the MTA starts cleaning up elevated tracks, the NYC brunch directory, and more in today’s daily NY news edition.

Quick note: There are no April Fools articles listed today.

Late night subway work this week will affect the 1, 3, 6, D, F, N, R, and G trains. (Subway Changes)

The state’s $175 billion budget passed early on Sunday, including cash bail reforms, a new mansion tax, a plastic bag ban, a property tax cap, and congestion pricing. (NY Times)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban. (Grub Street)

What’s not included in the state’s budget? Mobile sports betting. (NY Post)

Seven takeaways from the state budget. (NY Times)

It’s time to vote in participatory budgeting! There is $35 million to spend in the 32 communities in the city and you have a say in how it’s spent, and you can vote online! (nyc.gov)

Once you’ve voted, you can submit your own idea for the next cycle, like this idea for new bike racks. (PBNYC)

With the Hudson Yards open, the city has turned its eyes towards the next railroad yard to develop in Sunnyside, Queens. (Sunnyside Post)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

An ode to the longtime neighborhood bar and what the loss of it means for the city. (Curbed)

Citi Bike is headed to where it’s never been before: Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Add the D train to the list of trains you want to steer clear of walking underneath. The MTA announced it will start cleaning the undersides of the D train’s elevated tracks after the 7 train started raining subway parts last month. The work is starting from the Stillwell Ave station. (Bklyner)

A history of NYC’s 13 triangle buildings. (Untapped Cities)

Summer school, but this is actually interesting. Prospect Park is looking or immigrant professors, researches, and lecturers to teach their “Open Air University,” which runs from June 11 to June 30. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Summerhill, Crown Heights’ “bullet hole” bar, has closed. (News 12)

Smorgasburg is coming back to its outdoor locations and Time Out has some suggestions about what you’re gonna want to taste. Here’s the full list of vendors/a>. (Time Out)

Former Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis has been accused of rape. Porzingis claims the encounter was consensual. (amNY)

Sink your sweet tooth into Godiva’s midtown cafe, opening on April 18. (Eater)

It’s estimated 90,000 to 230,000 birds die in the city as a result of colliding with glass buildings. A proposed bill would require 90% of glass in new and altered buildings to be treated to reduce bird fatalities. (Curbed)

Inside the battle to fight off invasive species washing down the Bronx River from Westchester. (NY Times)

6sqft is hiring!

Should you wash your hands after being on the subway? No, because except Brooklyn. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Former Assemblymember Dov Hikind is blaming a Bklyner reporter for organizing the protest against Councilmember Kalman Yeger’s comments that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Bklyner)

There’s at least one benefit of living in Staten Island: it only costs you $5.50 to cross the Verrazzano to Brooklyn. If you’re a Brooklynite (or anyone else), it’ll cost you $19. (Bklyner)

A deep dive into Industry City’s effect on Sunset Park and UPROSE, a decades-old community group whose goal was always to revitalize that area as a manufacturing hub. (The Indypendent)

If you have someone who always wants to go to brunch but never has an idea of where to go: The NYC Brunch Directory. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.