The Briefly for November 7, 2019 – The “Lubing Up the Cube in Astor Place” Edition

A list of lying NYPD officers, low voter turnout in this year’s elections, no one wants to live in Turtle Bay, the best coffee shop in the US, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The sweet spot for rent in the city might be $2,700 and four other things you need to know about the city’s real estate market. (StreetEasy)

The life, death, and rebirth of the Orchard Street pedestrian mall, the only street in the city that closes on Sundays to become a pedestrian mall. (Bowery Boogie)

A look at how gentrification has changed Fort Greene. (NY Times)

How does the cube in Astor Place stay able to spin? It gets lubed. (EV Grieve)

Commercial rent control may be how the city fights the retail vacancy crisis. (Gothamist)

Death certificates for overdoses in New York state must state a type of opioid thanks to a bill signed into law by Governor Cuomo on Tuesday. (amNewYork)

“The Seated IV” from Wangechi Mutu, which sits outside the Met as part of the facade, will be on display until June, instead of coming to an end in January. (NY Times)

Gothamist/WNYC has been fighting to get the secret list that each of the five borough District Attorneys maintains of cops who have been accused of dishonesty. Thanks to a successful Freedom of Information request, a three-page list of liar cops from the Brooklyn DA’s office was released on Wednesday. (Gothamist)

Who wants to live in Turtle Bay or Midtown? That question might be harder to answer than you think. Of the entire city, those are the two neighborhoods with the most real estate price drops in October. (amNewYork)

The best restaurants in Inwood. (The Infatuation)

Not much of the city voted on Tuesday. Only 13.9% of registered voters actually voted. While early voting was supposed to make voting easier, the locations were limited to 33 across the entire city. The mayor is hoping to increase that number to 100 for the 2020 election. (amNewYork)

James O’Neill is leaving his commissionership with the NYPD for a security job at Visa. (Patch)

The best coffee shop in the USA is Sey Coffee on Grattan Street in Bushwick, according to Food & Wine magazine. (Patch)

The definitive guide to the Hudson Yards development boom. (Curbed)

A $50 million triplex penthouse on Central Park West, once belonging to Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, can be yours if you’ve got $50 million lying around. (StreetEasy)

The president will return to the city that hates him to kick off Monday’s Veteran’s Day parade in Manhattan. This just went from parade to shit show. (amNewYork)

Where to go for affogato, the city’s newest must-try dessert, vanilla gelato with espresso poured over it. (Eater)

The Long Island City Clock Tower is going to go through a restoration that will start and end next year. (LIC Post)

120,000 pounds of clothes were collected for donation at the start of the NYC Marathon, with those clothes going to Goodwill. Since 2012 a million pounds have been collected and donated. (amNewYork)

Once the L train’s signal updates are complete, the M train is the next line to be upgraded and inconvenienced by late-night service disruptions while they’re being installed. (amNewYork)

Billy Eichner remains the only person I want one of the hundreds that call Met Life Stadium home. (Gothamist)

The best restaurants in Sunnyside and Woodside. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)