The Briefly for May 5, 2020 – The “100s of Miles of Hell for His Downstairs Neighbors” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor bans all outdoor First Amendment activities, a tale of two cities of NYPD social distancing enforcement, where to order healthy delivery & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 61˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The city’s doctors are bringing their attention to a new mystery illness that is affecting children and is potentially tied to COVID-19. The symptoms are similar to toxic shock syndrome or Kawasaki disease and have affected children ages 2 to 15. All 15 children identified with this mystery illness have been hospitalized. There have also been some cases of the mystery illness in European children. If a child displays the symptoms of fever, rash, abdominal pain, or vomiting, contact a doctor immediately. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A look at 13 times in history that the NYC subway shut down. (Noah Shiedlower for Untapped New York)

Michael Ortiz set out to run 100 miles a week for 100 weeks, happening inside his Brooklyn apartment, and for some reason, the Times didn’t ask a single question of his downstairs neighbors. (Christopher Solomon for NY Times)

A true COVID-19 comedy of errors. When Dorothea Buschell died in Bay Ridge, her family wasn’t notified. She had a burial plot in Farmingdale, but her body was sent to and buried in a Morganville, N.J. cemetery. Her family, including comedian Elayne Boosler, was charged for tolls to get the body to New Jersey, a dress, makeup, gratuities, clergy, a mahogany casket, a cross and rosary beads, and all for a Jewish woman. The body? It can’t be interred in the right cemetery until the pandemic is over. (Virginia Breen for The City)

Brooklyn’s 39th Street Pier is being used as a long-term morgue storage facility with freezer trucks storing bodies so families can claim the bodies of their loved ones. This is instead of temporarily burying bodies on Hart Island, where the bodies of 522 COVID-19 victims were buried. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Video: Oddly satisfying time-lapses of the NYC skyline and Brooklyn Bridge being drawn (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The NYPD shouldn’t be enforcing social distancing. That’s the message from Police Benevolent Association President Patrick Lynch, who cites vague guidelines and mixed messages, leaving cops to “fend for themselves.” He also said the NYPD is being “thrown under the bus” referring to the video of an officer making an arrest by threatening to tase a bystander and arresting him by punching him in the head multiple times. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The NYPD doesn’t seem to be great with following directions, even when they’re provided, as evidence by the four officers who saved a cat that was stuck inside a car’s engine. In the photos, three of four officers are wearing no face mask. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Francisco Garcia, the NYPD officer based on his shield number, who was responsible for the violent arrest in the East Village, has been the subject of seven civil lawsuits in the last five years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said he was “not happy” with the tactics used in the arrest and the NYPD deferred prosecution with no fines and no bail. (NY1)

It’s hard to not see the connections of how the NYPD handled stop and frisk or fare evasions to social distancing. While Francisco Garcia was making his arrest of a black on an East Village street, there were NYPD officers photographed handing out masks to white people in parks who weren’t social distancing. (Lauren Evans for Jezebel)

Trevor Noah is paying the salaries of The Daily Show’s crew until production begins to ramp back up in the television industry. (Ishena Robinson for The Root)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is asserting an emergency power to ban all outdoor First Amendment activity even if people wear masks and follow distancing guidelines after Reclaim Pride tried to hold a press conference to protestSamaritan’s Purse in Central Park. They were told to disperse immediately under threat of arrest by the NYPD (Andy Humm for Gay City News)

New York City is launching a massive drive to distribute millions of masks to residents in the coming weeks to help New Yorkers comply with state mandates requiring residents to wear face coverings while in public. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Video: The Sakura Matsuri festival was canceled, but it doesn’t mean you can’t bring the cherry blossoms to you, although it will be considerably more difficult to do a TikTok with the trees this way. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

When will restaurants return? Strap in, because it may be a while. Restaurants are in phase three of the state’s reopening plan and arts and entertainment is in phase four. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Squibb Bridge is finally open, but also impossible to practice social distancing on. Another chapter in the bridge’s short, but troubled existence. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Here are NYC’s 2020 James Beard Awards finalists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Briefly HQ has ordered a few meals that I’d describe as “fat meals” in the last few weeks. Here’s where to order healthy delivery in NYC. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Madeline for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 27, 2020 – The “Who is the Most Powerful Person in New York City?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Staten Island’s rebellion against speed cameras, the F train is headed for construction, the Gowanus Canal cleanup, eating in Mott Haven, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 43˚
Light rain in the morning.

Central Park has a turtle problem. The red-eared slider turtle, technically listed as an invasive species, is having its run of Central Park and muscling out the park’s other species of turtles. How did they get there? They’re usually pets who are abandoned in the park because they’ve grown to an unmanageable size, or their humans weren’t ready for a potentially 50+ year commitment to their new shelled friend. (Sarah Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: See life in NYC from 1911 with this colorized and restored 4K footage. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The 100 most powerful people in New York City. The mayor is #4, which seems high. No, I did not make the list as the person who runs The Briefly, maybe in 2021. (City and State)

Pedro Colon, 61, faces criminal charges after his bus hit Patience Albert, 10, and a 15-year-old boy on the corner of Wortman Avenue and Crescent Street in Brooklyn. The 15-year-old survived, Patience Albert did not. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Get ready for over a year’s worth of construction on the F train to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. The 14+ month job will also add cell service and wifi to the tunnel, so the next time you’re imprisoned by the MTA underneath the East River, you’ll also have to endure someone making a FaceTime call at the same time. Work is slated to start sometime later this year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s not time to freak out, but the coronavirus in the United States is “more of a question of exactly when this will happen” and not if, according to the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. Here is how to prepare for coronavirus in NYC. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The mayor has been requesting the CDC allow New York City labs to test for coronavirus and that passengers arriving in NYC be screened for it. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

New York, as we know it, will no longer exist tomorrow. […] It’ll be the 1970’s all over again. People will get mean, the streets won’t be safe, graffiti everywhere, and movies will only cost three dollars.” -Tracey Jordan (30 Rock)

Here are NYC’s James Beard Awards semifinalists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

First Lady Chirlane McCray is considering running for Brooklyn Borough President. People of Brooklyn, I implore you to stop electing anyone in the de Blasio family into any public office in New York City. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A look back at the Depression-era shanty towns in New York City parks. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

The NYPD is investigating police union boss Ed Mullins, the head of the Sergeants Benevolent Association. Mullins, who will never be accused of making the rational move, has taken to Facebook to declare “I WILL NOT BE SILENCED BY THE THREAT OF DISCIPLINE, NOW OR EVER!” This is a man who was quoted as saying “Ferguson Missouri was a lie,” declared war on the mayor, NYPD officers should stand “shoulder-to-shoulder” with ICE and the list goes on. The investigation is to see if his views undermine his capacity as a sergeant, where he earns a salary of $133,524. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

State Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron upheld an August 2019 ruling that four towers planned for the Lower East Side Two Bridges development cannot move forward. The ruling says the land-review process was illegally bypassed and that 2,775 new apartments and 2.5 million square feet of new space does not qualify as “minor modifications.” (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The MTA announced 1,800 planned job cuts on Wednesday, but hasn’t said where they are coming from or if they are part of the 2,700 job cuts announced in the summer. The agency is hoping to close the projected billion dollar plus deficit projected by 2023. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Harvey Weinstein may never see the inside of Rikers Island to avoid “another Epstein incident.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A look back on when Mayor Bloomberg wanted poor people to drink less soda. (Arthur Delaney for HuffPost)

Maybe Mayor Bloomberg should never have uttered “we treated our teachers the right way” during this week’s Democratic debate, because NYC’s teachers have the receipts. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Amazon continues to rent buildings across the city, this time it’s a 300,000 square foot space in Middle Village, taking over the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s former space. (Bill Parry for amNewYork Metro)

The Trump administration can withhold millions of dollars in law enforcement grants from so-called sanctuary jurisdictions that refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities, according to a ruling issued on Wednesday from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan, a break from three previous court rulings. NYC received about $4 million a year in law enforcement grants. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The City Council will consider a package of bills aimed at limiting how much food delivery apps like GrubHub and Seamless can charge restaurants. (Jeffery C. Mays and David Yaffe-Bellany for NY Times)

Staging a Broadway should is tough, staging a Broadway show in Madison Square Garden for 18,000 students is tougher. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Staten Islanders have been wrapping yellow ribbons around utility poles to indicate the presence of speed cameras. The argument of the Facebook group behind the effort is that the speed cameras are nothing more than a money grab from the city. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Most elected officials in Staten Island won’t be participating in the island’s St. Patrick’s Day parade because the parade’s organizers will not allow Staten Island’s largest LGBT to march. Republican State Assemblymembers Nicole Malliotakis and Mike Reilly have announced they will be marching, perhaps making the political decision that Staten Islanders hate the LGBT community more than they hate bigotry in general. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

Here’s how the Gowanus Canal clean-up will proceed. (Pardon Me for Asking)

Where to eat in Mott Haven. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Camila for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 7, 2019 – The “Would You Jump in the East River to Save a Dog?” Edition

The #RethinkLinkNYC campaign, the Met Gala, the target on de Blasio’s back, the Kosciuszko Bridge is ahead of schedule, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Riad Nasr and Lee Hanson’s Frenchette in TriBeCa was awarded the James Beard award for Best New Restaurant. (NY Times)

While the good people of New York City, his friends, and anyone with common sense don’t want Mayor Bill de Blasio to run for president, he is none of those people. Even if he does make the decision, his questionable fund-raising tactics, and the subsequent investigations into them will be the first speed bump on his way to not becoming president. (NY Times)

While the Rethink LinkNYC campaign isn’t throwing bricks at the LinkNYC kiosks, it is educating pedestrians about the three cameras that are always recording and the questionable nature of who can access those images. (EV Grieve)

The trade for the LinkNYC kiosks is supposed to be revenue for the city, right? The 55-inch screens across the 1,800 kiosks will fall $34 million below projections for the first five years of the program. (Gotham Gazette)

High drama in the East River as a local hero jumped off a pier to save a dog who decided to take an unannounced swim. (Gothamist)

Photos from the 2019 Met Gala. (NY Times)

Here’s a rundown of the nine bills advocates are pushing forward in the state legislature that, when packaged together, are termed “universal rent control.” (The Indypendent)

A look at the After Hours Project, a community-based syringe exchange and harm reduction program, a social and mental health services provider, an opioid treatment facility and provides additional services as well. (Bushwick Daily)

The most beautiful places to get married in the city. (Curbed)

The city’s first new marina in fifty years will be in Brooklyn Bridge Park. The ONE˚15 marina will house over 100 boats up to 200 feet in length. (6sqft)

Housing 20,000 bees on the roof of The Shops at Fresh Meadows is, as the original headline explains “best for bees-ness“. (QNS)

Five of the most unusual places in Brooklyn. Make your own jokes. (Untapped Cities)

Add this to your nightmare file: A 22-year-old woman fell from her apartment’s roof on East 25th Street while taking photos of the skyline. She’s alive, partially because she landed in the building’s trash area. (Gothamist)

NIMBYs, they’re everywhere! Park Slopers say the city wants to “pit the working class people of this city against the homeless,” due to plans to partner with a nonprofit shelter to provide 253 apartments for homeless New Yorkers. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look back twenty years ago at Giuliani’s administration “of, for, and by white people.” (Village

The plans for four “neighborhood” jails that will replace Riker’s Island will each be reduced by at least 10% to better integrate the buildings to the neighborhoods that will be housed in. The number of inmates is currently around 7,400 but is expected to drop to 4,000 by 2027. (The City)

Manhattan and Brooklyn are among the fourth and seventh most bike-friendly places in the country, according to PropleForBikes’ second annual city ratings report. (Curbed)

One of the joys of warm weather in the city is discovering how many places use goats to cut their grass. Add Riverside Park to the list, as 24 goats will “work” through August 30 between 119th and 125th Streets. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Patch is on the allergies in the city beat, showing the next week is going to be particularly rough for those of us who feel personally attacked by the city’s flora. (Patch)

There are a lot of stories about how Louis CK is not allowing people to record any of his material without his consent, which is tragically funny on one hand, but on the other hand, do not go to see Louis CK perform comedy. This city is full of hundreds, if not thousands, of comedians. (BrooklynVegan)

Three-year-old Zoey Pereira’s death is being investigated as a homicide. Her father was seen running from a car which burst into flames, which had been chained shut with two gas canisters and a propane tank in the trunk. Her father was taken into custody for questioning. (NY Times)

Add the Macy’s Fourth of July fireworks to the list of things which aren’t coming to Long Island City. The Brooklyn Bridge was chosen as this year’s location. (LIC Post)

Farewell to the original Essex Market, which is officially closed after 79 years. (Bedford + Bowery)

The Kosciuszko Bridge’s second span will open in September, years ahead of schedule. No specific opening date was set. (amNY)

How does a street pretzel compare to an authentic German Bretzel? (Viewing NYC)

The Durst Organization is lobbying the city to add a new NYC Ferry line between Astoria and the Upper East Side. This might have to do with the seven residential towers the organization is opening in Astoria. (Curbed)

14th Street’s The Blind Pig will be closing on May 18 after the landlord imposed a 50% rent hike. The site is currently listed at $300,000/month. (EV Grieve)

From a 1970 bedroom to throwing axes, from secret rooms to Oscar Wilde, 15 unique bars in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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