The Briefly for September 3, 2019 – The “Paying to Sleep in a Van in the East Village” Edition

Cuomo calls for a National Grid alternative, a giraffe corpse found in the water, the Boerum Hill chicken massacre mystery, fall foliage, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Brooklyn Detention Complex will close by the end of the year and its inmates will be transferred to Rikers Island. This is the jail that had a fire in the winter that robbed it of heat for days on end and struggled with the heat during the hottest days of summer. Mayor de Blasio’s community jail plan is set for a vote in city council this month. (The City)

Three illegal Airbnb landlords agreed to a $1 million settlement after making $21.4 million from illegal rentals. Seems like a good deal to me. (Patch)

$85 a night on Airbnb to sleep in a van in the East Village. (Airbnb)

Everyone’s talking about the end of summer, and even though it doesn’t end for three more weeks, here’s a map of when to see peak fall foliage in the city. (Patch)

Meet the Houdini Museum of New York’s 23-year-old director. (amNY)

The top 10 secrets of Madison Square Garden, although “they dress up the backstage area for artists” doesn’t seem like much of a secret. (Untapped Cities)

The restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including 3 restaurants ordered closed after 100+ point violations. (Patch)

The boiler room of the Chelsea Market is now an art space, with ARTECHOUSE taking over the space. The first show is Machine Hallucinations from digital artist Refik Anadol. (Untapped Cities)

The state finished the Kosciuszko Bridge early and the city’s Department of Transportation was caught with their pants down and the bike paths to the bridge weren’t ready. (Curbed)

Did you see the mystery Boerum Hill chicken massacre aftermath video? (Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill has no plans to step down in light of the Police Benevolent Association’s vote of no confidence. (amNY)

If you’re thinking about a new look for the fall, you’re in luck because Cheetos and Forever21 are giving out free Flamin’ Haute Cheeto makeovers on Friday and Saturday. (Time Out)

NYC Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes will open next week. (amNY)

Just in time, they can investigate who vandalized the Silver Gull in Queens with anti-semitic, pro-Nazi, and racist graffiti. (NY Times)

National Grid has been refusing to serve new businesses as a tactic to get their gas pipeline approved by the state and the governor isn’t having it, making public statements that the Department of Public Service should consider alternative franchisees. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD’s leadership is very white. (The City)

This weekend was a particularly violent one when it came to shootings. The NYPD shot and killed a man in Jamaica, Queens who was the suspect in a bodega shooting. (Gothamist)

A shootout with the NYPD in Brownsville, Brooklyn has left a man dead. (amNY)

A shooting in Richmond Hill, Queens left one dead and two seriously injured. (QNS)

Smithsonian Museum Day is coming up on September 21, which means free admission to 30 of the city’s museums if you register in advance. (Time Out)

The Paris Theater, the city’s last single-screen movie theater, is closed. As John Waters comments in this Times piece Where will old art movie fans go to see rarified foreign films in the safety of a rich neighborhood?” (NY Times)

Cars were removed from Central Park last June but traffic signals and lines painted on the streets haven’t been changed, causing chaos and creating a wild atmosphere for pedestrians and cyclists alike. (Streetsblog)

Photos from the Electric Zoo on Randall’s Island. (Gothamist)

How the global diamond trade helped shape the city’s skyline. (The Real Deal)

An SUV driver hit and killed a man he suspected broke into his car on Monday, marking the 21st cyclist to be killed by a driver in the city this year. (Gothamist)

How did a giraffe corpse end up at the bottom of the Lower New York Bay? How about a piano in the Bronx River? These are the mysteries of Underwater New York. (Patch)

Photos from J’Ouvert 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want dinner to feel like going out. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 29, 2019 – The “Fried Chicken Sandwich Ridiculousness Ends This Week” Edition

The police union calls for de Blasio and O’Neill’s removal, 15 trendy restaurants you can get into, security measures for the West Indian Day Parade, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A ban on foie gras is working its way through the city council and could come up for a vote in the fall. More than half of the council has so-sponsored the bill and it has support from the mayor, but there are questions about the ability to enforce the bill. (NY Times)

Despite the ever-changing nature of the city, Gem Spa is swimming upstream on the corner of St. Marks and 2nd Ave in a struggle to survive. (NY Times)

New construction can’t stop the rats. (Bowery Boogie)

This week ends the Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich frenzy that took over August, as all locations will be completely sold out of the sandwich. (Grub Street)

Google Pigeon is turning to crowdsourcing to solve real-time public transit information, kinda like Waze for the buses and trains. It might be hard to log a delay between stations without a connection to the internet. (Streetsblog)

Photos: Inside Borough Park’s Torah Animal World, which is full of taxidermied animals mentioned in the Torah. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be distracted, the classics are still the only real way to enjoy a meal at Katz’s Deli. (Eater)

The Department of Buildings blames construction materials stored on the roof for the building collapse on Tuesday in the Bronx, calling it a “preventable tragedy.” (Gothamist)

Here’s what eliminating the city’s schools’ gifted programs would look like and what would take their place. (Chalk Beat)

The 21 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall. (Time Out)

The United States could lose its measles elimination status by October if more cases of the disease are discovered in NYC or NY state. (Huff Post)

Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate activist, arrived via a solar-powered boat on Wednesday after a 15-day trip across the Atlantic to attend the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (NY Times)

It’s rare, but every now and then you come across a subway busker actually worth listening to, like these two guys nailing Prince’s “Kiss.” (Gothamist)

How “public” is New York City’s public transportation? If it doesn’t serve all, who is it meant to serve? (The Indypendent)

No one wants to hear it (except the Halloween-obsessed spooks), but summer is coming to an end. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

How to spend a day eating, drinking, and enjoying Snug Harbor in Staten Island. (NY Times)

The police union passed a vote of no confidence Wednesday in Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill, calling for O’Neill to resign and for Governor Cuomo to remove Mayor de Blasio from office. This is in protest over the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold on Eric Garner lead to his death. (Politico)

The history of the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (6sqft)

The NYPD announced safety measures for the West Indian Day Parade, summarizing their approach with “There will literally be a cop everywhere.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What happened to the city’s safe injection sites? The mayor announced them in May of 2018, but none have opened. Activists that gathered outside Cuomo’s Manhattan offices are blaming the governor for intentionally delaying the state’s mandated review of the program. (Gothamist)

Did you talk shit about Amazon after they announced their Long Island City HQ2 plans? If you did, you’re probably in a secret “NY Negative Statements” dossier the company kept. (Gothamist)

The Notorious B.I.G., but in Funko Pop form. (Brooklyn Vegan)

What the Dodgers meant to Brooklyn. (Brooklyn this Week)

The New York Fire Department forced a Muslim firefighter to shave his beard in violation of his religious beliefs, according to a new lawsuit. (Patch)

15 trendy restaurants you can get into. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 28, 2019 – The “Signs of a Wegmans Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

The growth in the car population is outpacing the growth of the actual population, the best floor in a walk-up, taking a wallaby for a walk, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All the street closings and timing of the West Indian Day Parade and all the associated events over Labor Day weekend. (Curbed)

An Andy Warhol tour and map of Manhattan from artist Patricia Fernández. (Untapped Cities)

Five takeaways from the plan to scrap the city’s gifted school programs. Will Mayor de Blasio follow the recommendation from the task force he assembled or will he try to run out the clock as he did with Eric Garner’s death? (NY Times)

It’s getting real. Signs are going up at the home of the future Brooklyn Wegmans. (Brownstoner)

Does it seem odd to anyone else that the mayor is supporting restrictions to hotel development after receiving support and campaign contributions from the hotel industry union? (6sqft)

The Mast Brothers are out of Brooklyn, doing the hipster move from Williamsburg to upstate. (Eater)

Every neighborhood has its old-school spots that have been there for decades, and many of them are endangered. Two Toms in Gowanus has been family owned since 1948, but the building the restaurant is in is for sale and the listing says it could be delivered vacant “if necessary.” (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The growth of the number of cars in the city is outpacing the growth of the city’s population. (Streetsblog)

The city is full of hidden history. Sometimes that history is a poster from 2000 for the movie Road Trip. (Gothamist)

In praise of the Manhattan dive bar: Cheap beer and good atmosphere are increasingly hard to find, but it’s out there. (amNY)

A worker was killed and five injured in a partial building collapse in Norwood in the Bronx. (Metro)

A wall in Chinatown with messages of support for the protests in Hong Kong has been vandalized twice in less than a week. Global politics are also local politics. (Gothamist)

What’s the best floor to live on in a six-floor walk-up? (Street Easy)

Jeffrey Epstein’s victims will never have their full day in court, but they have vowed to not stop fighting. (Gothamist)

The family of Eric Garner filed a judicial inquiry of Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill to answer questions about their handling of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of the NYPD. (Politico)

Leslie Jones is not returning to SNL. (Gothamist)

Video: Nothing to see here here, just a man walking taking his pet wallaby for a walk. Nope, this was in Bed-Stuy, not Bushwick. (Patch)

The total population in the city’s jails has fallen 23% from 2014, but the population jailed for parole violations increased by 20% in the same period, with the average stay lasting 60 days while they wait for parole court dates. (Gothamist)

Seven acres under the new Kosciuszko Bridge in Greenpoint will be made into a park. There’s no proposed opening date and construction has not begun. The project will be lead by the North Brooklyn Parks Alliance. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Conservative Times Op-Ed columnist and climate change denier Bret Stephens quit Twitter because someone called him a “bedbug.” Poor Bret. (Gothamist)

Video: It’ll take more than It’s Pennywise the clown to rattle New Yorkers riding the L late at night. (Patch)

28 of the best sports bars in the city. (Eater)