The Briefly for November 15, 2019 – The “Why Do Tourists Love the M&M Store?” Weekend Edition

The weekend subway changes, the MTA will pay $250 million to get $200 million back, the next great pastrami sandwich, Hart Island will become a park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s planned subway disruptions are non-existent on the numbered lines, but hits the E, R, L, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The MTA is considering a restructuring “transformation plan” that will end up firing thousands of administrative jobs in an effort to save money, but will still end up with a $426 million deficit in 2023. (amNewYork)

While the MTA fires thousands, they’ll be making way for 500 police officers. The cops will cost $250 million and are theoretically partially financed by the $200 million they will be saving through anti-fare evasion efforts, or to put it another way over 18 million subway rides. What a deal! We only have to spend $250 million to get back $200 million. (Streetsblog)

This is the real question. Why do tourists love the M&M store so much? (/r/AskNYC)

How can you make ordering lunch worse? Ask Sweetgreen, whose “3.0” location manages to lower the bar even further while you pay $15 for a salad. (Eater)

The story that started with the most questionable Halloween decorations has a surprise ending of honest conversation. (NY Times)

The East Side Coastal Resiliency Plan, which will protect the Lower East Side from the rising ocean and storms like Superstorm Sandy passed City Council, but there is already a lawsuit planned to try to stop the phased construction along the 2.4 miles of shore. Leading the charge is Arthur Schwartz, the same lawyer who tried to sue the 14th St busway out of existence. (Curbed)

Major League Baseball signed a deal with Nike that would have shut out multiple businesses surrounding Yankee stadium from selling Yankees gear, effectively killing them completely, but after an rallying effort from the Yankees’ front office, places like Stan the Man’s will be included in the MLB deal. (amNewYork)

Hart Island, the city’s mass gravesite for early AIDS patients, stillborn children, the disenfranchised, the unknown, and Veterans that dates back to the Civil War, will be transferred from the Department of Corrections to the Parks Department. As part of the bill passed by the City Council, the Department of Transportation will be charged with creating transportation to the 101-acre island. (Curbed)

In response to the candy and churro-related arrests happening in the subways, the mayor asked the MTA to consider designated “vending areas” in subway stations. Could it be that de Blasio’s never-ending feud with Governor Cuomo actually spurs the mayor to stand up for the people of the city? (Politico)

The mayor has asked some 18,000 city employees, 15,000 of them FDNY, to be a part of the new Outreach NYC program. The program will report unsheltered homeless people in an attempt to connect them with voluntary outreach programs. (amNewYork)

An 85-foot mural by Keith Haring that once adorned the halls of Grace House, a youth organization in the Upper West Side, sold for $3.9 million. The church who owned the land sold the building and removed the mural in worry that it could have been destroyed in renovations. (NY Times)

Facebook is moving into 1.5 million square feet of office in Hudson Yards next year. While this isn’t mentioned in the article, I assume that means that Apple won the bidding war for space in the Farley Building inside the post office on 34th. (amNewYork)

Via is now offering $15 rideshares from LaGuardia to Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn and $20 rides to Staten Island and the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Our airports are the most expensive in the country, from the flights to parking to coffee. (Patch)

Why not add ice skating to that list? The TWA Hotel will be installing an ice skating rink at JFK airport. (amNewYork)

Photos: A first look inside the Waldorf Astoria’s historic conversion. (6sqft)

Attorney General Letitia James is suing B&H Photo for failing to pay $7.3 million of taxes when offering instant rebates. When offering an instant rebate, the law says you are taxed on the pre-rebate price, but B&H had been collecting taxes on the post-discounted price. (amNewYork)

A teenager was arrested and charged with three counts each of hate crime assault, aggravated harassment, and harassment for throwing eggs as a synagogue and Orthodox Jewish New Yorkers. (Gothamist)

Comings and goings from Broadway: Going is Tootsie, coming is Woman in Black, KPOP, and cuts to West Side Story. (amNewYork)

Scooter and Pete are two adorable new Red Panda fur babies making their at the Prospect Park Zoo. There are photos and video. (Gothamist)

What’s going on with chicken parm and horny singles? (Eater)

There’s a deadly drug-resistant fungus called Candida auris. More than 800 cases have been reported in the country and half of them have been in New York. A list of hospitals, long-care nursing homes, and hospice units that have been exposed is available. (amNewYork)

The mayor held a town hall and you can be sure that for any criticism levied against him or his administration, he had someone else to blame and in a few occasions it was the audience. (Gothamist)

The NYPD arrested and charged Michael Hall with attempted murder, two counts of arson, one count of criminal possession of a dangerous weapon, two counts of attempted assault, one count of menacing and harassment in connection to a series of fires at the NYCHA complex, the Louis Pink Houses, that occurred over a span of six months. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s next great pastrami sandwich is from Hometown Bar-B-Que in Industry City. (Eater)

The 16 most exciting Caesar Salads in the city. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for May 16, 2019 – The “Maybe NYC is Better Off With An Absentee Mayor?” Edition

The TWA Hotel is open, the best tiki bars in the city, the governor blocks the Williams gas pipeline, a helicopter crashed in the Hudson, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

A new bill is looking to ban landlords from using facial recognition technology in their buildings and would allow tenants to pursue civil lawsuits against any landlord who did. (Gothamist)

You’ve got four chances to check out Manhattanhenge this summer, starting in two weeks. (amNY)

By the time you read this, there’s a good chance that our dummy of a mayor has decided to not listen to New Yorkers, or his friends, or common sense, or the rest of the country, and launched his presidential bid on Good Morning America. Maybe the city will be better off if he’s never around? (Splinter)

The City Council wants to provide the NYPD with more funding for the understaffed Collision Investigation Squad to investigate the 2,000 – 3,000 fatal crashes annually, of which they respond to just over 5% of. James O’Neill, NYPD commissioner, isn’t interested. (Streetsblog)

A dump truck driver struck and killed a 58-year-old man while he was crossing W. 21st Street in Coney Island on Saturday. (Brooklyn Paper)

The TWA Hotel is open in all its retro glory. (Curbed)

More photos from inside the TWA Hotel. (6sqft)

Has the TWA Hotel truly opened if there was not a list of ten fun facts about it? (Untapped Cities)

New York City is nothing without its eccentricities, including Washington Square Park’s Bubble Man, Stephen Duncan. (GVSHP)

The best happy hours in Brooklyn. (The Infatuation)

There are over 1.6 million feet of sidewalk sheds in the city, and now there’s an interactive map to keep tabs on them all. (Viewing NYC)

Over 120,000 New Yorkers rely on the MTA’s Acess-A-Ride to get around the city, but just because they rely on it, it doesn’t mean it’s at all reliable. (NY Times)

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, except when it comes to the big dumb idiots at Big Seven Travel, which declared the Boston Accent “sexier” than the New York accent. (Patch)

A look at Cafe Phin, the city’s only authentic Vietnamese coffee roaster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art will no longer accept gifts from the human monsters of the Sackler family, architects of the country’s opioid crisis. (NY Times)

The gala honoring Brazil’s president and the man who is so outwardly homophobic it wouldn’t be a shock if he was secretly gay himself Jair Bolsonaro happened without his presence, but not without interruptions and protests. (Gothamist)

How did the subway lines get their letters or numbers? Let’s take a look. (amNY)

LaGuardia and JFK are nowhere near the top-ranked airports in the world, which is no shock to anyone who has the dubious pleasure of traveling through them. (Patch)

Don’t look now, but the company responsible for Northside Festival and Brooklyn Magazine, which had held tens of thousands of dollar from former employees, seems to have ghosted. The website for the festival says the 2019 information is “coming soon.” (Gothamist)

Check out the architectural finalists for the city’s Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC competition, which challenged firms to design affordable housing on small lots across the city. (Curbed)

A “severely decomposed” body was found in the basement of a Brooklyn Heights building by maintenance workers. An NYPD investigation is ongoing. (Bklyner)

Marijuana isn’t legal for recreational use, but that hasn’t stopped the state legislature from moving on to “important” issues like trying to make texting or using or looking at any portable electronic device while crossing the road punishable by fines. (Gothamist)

A helicopter operated by “the Uber of helicopters” Blade landed in the Hudson River on Wednesday with no serious injuries or deaths, so it’s safe to watch the videos of it all going down without guilt. (Gothamist)

Non-profit internet service provider and privacy-friendly company NYC Mesh is expanding its service to Greenpoint. (Greenpointers)

Governor Cuomo’s administration blocked the Williams gas pipeline that would terminate just off the Rockaways, pointing out it would result in a failure to meet the state’s water quality standards. The company plans on reapplying, but with the governor’s focus on environmental issues, the chance of approval seems very low. (Politico)

The absolute best places for tiki drinks in the city. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for May 10, 2019 – The “Harlem’s WWI War Heroes Who Who Brought Jazz to France” Edition

Closing the Kusher Loophole, OMNY is coming, the officer whose chokehold killed Eric Garner’s disciplinary trial is moving forward, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The subway diversions are minimal this weekend, but when the bar is already so low, it’s hard to get underneath it. (Subway Changes)

Here’s a crazy idea. Is the L train slowdown going okay? (Bklyner)

NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo’s disciplinary trial in the death of Eric Garner will go forward, a New York State Supreme Court judge ruled Thursday. (880 WCBS)

Declawing your cat may soon be illegal. Manhattan Assemblymember Linda Rosenthal’s 2015 bill is gaining traction again thanks to the newly formed Domestic Animal Welfare Committee formed this year. The bill has the support of the Humane Society and Black Sabbath bassist Geezer Butler. (Politico)

The Harlem Hellfighters spent 191 days on the Front during World War I and in their time there, they helped introduce jazz to France and were some of the war’s most decorated soldiers. (6sqft)

It seems like the city shouldn’t have to deter people from parking on sidewalks, but here we are. City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is pushing to put traffic cameras specifically looking to catch drivers who block bike lanes and sidewalks as a part of Transportation Alternatives’ #TechforSafety campaign. (LIC Post)

Scrap the SHSAT test for the city’s elite high schools. That’s the message from Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network chapter in the city. (Politico)

The murder trial of the man accused of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz began with opening statements from the prosecution saying the murder was pre-meditated. (NY City Lens)

Some information about the OMNY system, the new system to replace MetroCards, and how they will work. They’re scheduled to be rolled out at the end of the month, but MetroCards will be around until 2023. (amNY)

The New York Aquarium has four new black-footed penguins, which are endangered. Of course, there are photos of baby penguins. (amNY)

Stop telling people things you heard at parties and actually learn about the city’s tap water. (StreetEasy)

The Soho Grifter was sentenced to 4-12 years, fined $24,000 and ordered to pay back $199,000. The only thing the fake German heiress will inherit is a prison jumpsuit. (NY Times)

The cheapest one-bedroom apartments in the city are, unsurprisingly, in far-flung neighborhoods, but who can argue with a one-bedroom for less than $1500? (Patch)

Here’s a quiz on what you can or can’t do on the subway. If you fail, you have to move to Hoboken. Sorry, those are just the rules. (Gothamist)

As it fights to contain the measles outbreak, the city’s attention is starting to turn towards schools with less than 90% vaccination rates, like the Brooklyn Waldorf School, which 24% of students are unvaccinated. (NY Times)

If you’ve never had the, uh, pleasure of driving in Manhattan, here’s a video to give you an idea of what it’s like. (Viewing NYC)

Here are the neighborhoods where it takes the NYPD the longest to respond to a 911 call. (Patch)

Where to pick up your picnic vittles near to the city park of your choice. (amNY)

Del Posto was named the best Italian restaurant in the nation by The Daily Meal. Eleven restaurants in the city made the top fifty. (Patch)

Take a look inside the TWA Hotel at JFK Airport one week before its opening day. (Curbed)

2019: After the Fall of New York. Imagine an 80s b-movie version of Children of Men, Escape From New York, Mad Max and Beneath the Planet of the Apes, but shittier and you’ll end up with this Italian movie. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s 17 new approved bills is aimed at closing the “Kushner loophole,” which allowed landlords to falsely claim the number of rent-regulated tenants in its buildings. (6sqft)

Shakespeare & Co is opening a bookstore in Brookfield Place in Battery Park, where Amazon just opened a new store. (amNY)

21 of the best LGBTQ bars in NYC to party at right now, depending on the time of day you read this. (amNY)

The mayor is calling the NYC Care card a “new health coverage option,” but it’s more of a public awareness campaign for pre-existed public services form the city. It’s a public awareness campaign that can improve public health, but the mayor is clearly misrepresenting it as health insurance because of his delusional idea that anyone wants to see him run for president. (Gothamist)

A mini-Smorgasburg is coming to Hudson Yards. Heaven forbid that people who live there have to go to Brooklyn for anything. (6sqft)

Rene Samaniego, an NYPD vice detective, admitted to participating in a prolific prostitution ring and gambling enterprise throughout Queens, Brooklyn and Nassau County. (QNS)

Chartwell Booksellers, the world’s only Winston Churchill bookstore, has been nearly hidden for 36 years on E 52nd St. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to rooftop bars and outdoor drinking in 2019. (Grub Street)

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