The Briefly for November 1-2, 2020 – The “Time to Buy Discount Candy” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: New York’s new travel rules, Halloween in NYC, the MTA proposes a doomsday scenario, must-try vegan dishes, an NYC book cart, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 57˚
Rain in the afternoon and evening.

Halloween is over. The first time you’ll hear “All I Want For Christmas Is You” this year could happen any minute now.

New York City is the second-best city in the world. Who did we lose out to? Those bastards in London. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

“I have to urge all New Yorkers—do not travel out of state for the holidays.” -Mayor de Blasio, laying out that this year, everyone gets a pass on visiting family. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Ask An Epidemiologist: How should I handle the holidays? Bullet point number one: If in doubt, don’t go. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An autumn NYC bingo card. (Jen Carlson and Sarah Butler for Gothamist)

The rules have changed for interstate travel, so let’s take a look. If you’re coming to New York, you’re supposed to have a negative Covid-19 test within three days of traveling and once you’re in New York, you’ll have to isolate until the fourth day after returning and take another Covid-19 test. If you decline a test, you have to quarantine for 14 days. This doesn’t apply to travel to and from Connecticut or New Jersey. This applies to travel from everywhere, not just specific states. How will this be enforced? Once again Cuomo has made his favorite move: shifting the blame onto “local health departments.” No doubt, he will have a press conference in a few weeks, blaming another surge in numbers of a lack of local enforcement. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo gave the go-ahead for schools in the city’s hot zones to reopen with stricter testing guidelines. Everyone, staff and students, must first test negative for Covid-19 and after that testing, 25% of the school must be tested on a weekly basis. A school will be shut down if nine positive tests come back or if any school with over 300 tests has a 2% positivity rate. The city’s rules state if a school has two positive cases, the school must close, so we are left in a weird place where the city’s rules apple on top of the state’s. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

How’s the city doing when it comes to Covid-19? Not great, Bob. There are 67 of 177 zip codes where the average positivity rate is over 2%. Sixteen of them are over 3%. (Elizabeth Kim and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Covid-19 hospitalizations are up, but the situation is not nearly as dire as it was in the spring, with multiple factors preventing a high death count. (J. David Goodman and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A Tale of Two Cities: Looking at why the rate of Covid-19 testing is 4x higher in wealthy neighborhoods compared to low-income neighborhoods. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

Only 15% of Manhattan office employees are expected to return by the end of this year, which is down from the estimated 26%, an estimate made in August. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Are you headed back to the office? Here are the perks companies are using to entice their workers to come back. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The only way to really self-isolate is to go to your own island. Ask Kim Kardashian-West, she’ll agree. For only $4.9 million, you can own your own private island in New York with a century-old mansion on the property along with 24/7 security, a private beach, and a kitchen larger than most restaurants in the city. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

The great divide in New York isn’t partisan or ideological. And it’s not about where Upstate begins, or which side of that mythical border you fall on. It’s a divide by wealth – of who is struggling amid this pandemic, and who is profiting off of it. Who faces the catastrophic consequences of New York’s budget deficit, and who is insulated from both the stakes of the problem and the policies that could be the solution.
-Public Advocate Jumaane Williams and State Senator Jessica Ramos, A just recovery: It’s time for a billionaires’ tax, for amNewYork Metro

Look at this warehouse full of 400 assholes in Williamsburg. Nearly 400 people were at an illegal Halloween party that was broken up by the city. eight people face multiple charges over the party. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Photos: Some traditions shouldn’t die. November 1? Time to look at photos of costumes and go raid the stores for candy. There was no Village Halloween parade this year, but here’s a photo gallery from Halloween parades past. Now go buy yourself some cheap candy (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

This year’s greatest Halloween innovation is the candy chute. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: Before we get into the election stuff, let’s take a moment to find serenity. Fall foliage is about to peak in NYC. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: More photos of foliage in the city. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Along with peak foliage, the bufflehead ducks are here. This link is complete with a guide to help you spot them. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Staten Island has a duck problem. It seems that people have been releasing domestic ducks into the wild and domestic ducks don’t have natural camouflage or know that it’s time to leave the city once it gets too cold. Urban Rangers have been doing their best to capture them and bring them to sanctuaries in order to prevent them from freezing to death in the winter. (Bree Driscoll for NY1)

How to avoid election stress. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

The most hotly contested election in NYC will be between Congressmember Max Rose and Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, and with a toss-up in the polls and a high number of absentee ballots, the fight will extend far beyond election day. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Who doesn’t love Paul Rudd? He showed up at the Barclay’s Center to give out cookies to people waiting to cast an early ballot. (Josephine Harvey for HuffPost)

Governor Cuomo once said that he wasn’t going to wait for neighboring states to legalize marijuana before he made it happen in New York. On Tuesday New Jersey is voting to legalize marijuana and New York has nothing aside from multiple years of promises that it’s gonna happen. Legalization is currently polling at 66%. (Karen Rouse for Gothamist)

The MTA will not be restoring overnight service on Election Day, forcing poll workers who need to have polling locations open at 6 am looking for other plans. The MTA says that poll workers can get car service if their commute is over 90 minutes on Election Day, but the Board of Education will foot the bill. (NY1)

The MTA has put a 50% reduction of service and scuttling improvements on the table when it comes to trying to fix a gaping hole in its budget. This is a doomsday scenario that would cause New York to lose nearly 450,000 jobs by 2022 and losing $50 billion in the process. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is the headline: Driver, Union Say MTA Bus Dispatchers Need Empathy Training After Menstrual Ordeal. (Hasani Gittens for The City)

Make sure that all of your non-internet-based clocks have been set for Daylight Saving Time. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Francisco Garcia, the NYPD officer with a history of seven misconduct lawsuits in five years who also was caught on video punching and then kneeling on a man’s neck during a social distance stop, quit the NYPD before a department trial was able to begin. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Demonstrators and police faced off Tuesday outside the New York City Police Benevolent Association’s headquarters in Lower Manhattan as part of a “Strike The PBA” event, calling for the PBA to be kicked out from the larger labor movement due to its support of officers who have killed New Yorkers and its endorsement of former New Yorker and known racist President Donald Trump. (Amba Guerguerian for The Indypendent)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea announced Juanita Holmes as the new Chief of Patrol, making her the first woman to ever hold the position in the 175-year history of the department and the highest-ranking Black woman on the police force. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“Police are on the scene after a car jumped the curb in Queens, killing a woman and child, and injuring a second child.” -Mayor de Blasio, who is not speaking from inside an alternative Cars-based alternate reality where cars are sentient and are capable of murder. In this reality, people who drive cars kill people. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

A crane accident in the city’s second-tallest building sent debris falling to 57th in Billionaire’s Row. Thankfully no one was hurt. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio gave the go-ahead for the sale of The Mets to billionaire Steve Cohen. Starting today, Cohen is re-instituting unionized employees’ pre-pandemic salaries. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Say hello to Brittany Bond, founder of Common Books, who operates the city’s only traveling book cart. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

“Always read the plaque” is a mantra we should all live by. Stop by 555 Hudson St to find a new plaque honoring Jane Jacobs, who lived at the address from 1947 – 1968. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

19 stand-out vegan dishes to try right now. (Emily Wilson for Eater)

The New York Times has discovered that people have roommates. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Apartment Porn: A $15 million, three-story Upper East Side penthouse that overlooks Central Park, complete with a glass solarium, two terraces, and a separate one-bedroom guest residence. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Heist! They stole more than 4,000 Prada, Gucci, and Chanel items from a cargo area at JFK, making off with $6 million in goods… until they were arrested. (Troy Closson for NY Times)

The best Filipino restaurants in the city. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for October 25 – 26, 2020 – The “Vote or Die” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Early voting is open, the best Vietnamese food in the city, dredging the Gowanus, Mayor de Blasio’s legacy of failure, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 56˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

The best restaurants near NYC’s early voting locations. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Early voting is open, now let’s talk about the legality of ballot selfies. (Valeriya Safronova for NY Times)

Speaking of early voting, it started across the city on Saturday and there were lines everywhere. Nearly 100,0000 voted on the first day of early voting, more than in all of 2018’s early voting. (David Cruz and Jen Chung for Gothamist)

On Friday, Mayor de Blasio announced a plan to recruit hundreds of city workers in a matter of days to join an “Election Observer Corps.” He has not recruited a single person, nor has he trained anyone. By contrast, AG Letitia James, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, and the head of Common Cause NY, Susan Lerner, already have 600 statewide volunteers who have been training for weeks for the election and have been monitoring polling sites already. Seems like the mayor could have endorsed this effort instead of announcing a new one less than 24 hours before early voting began. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

We will have hundreds of additional cops in uniform citywide who will be at the ready should they be needed.” -NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan, who maybe doesn’t realize that having a larger NYPD presence during an election may only serve to make things worse. (Danny Lewish for Gothamist)

This is the same NYPD whose union endorsed President Trump. (NBC New York)

Photos and Video: A Barred Owl hanging out. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Video: The Animal Care Centers rescued a pig from a Brooklyn backyard. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The city sells off unpaid property debts on a regular basis. The sale of debt was the subject of a Last Week Tonight program from a few years ago. While it raises money for the city, it also encourages foreclosures and the displacement of lower-income homeowners. This year’s tax lien sale has been postponed multiple times and City Council members are pushing to eliminate the program altogether. (Peter Senzamici for The City)

The EPA will begin dredging the Gowanus Canal mid-November. At the bottom of the canal sits a very thick and very old layer of tar, human poop and if the rumors are true, a few dead bodies. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Video: No questions asked about how these daredevils found their way to the roof of the GE Building, which is closed to visitors, but the views are spectacular. (svvvk on YouTube)

State officials have pulled a controversial proposal that would have allowed non-lawyers to oversee special education complaints in New York City. The proposal was first made in January. In the 2019-2020 school year, the city had 10,797 complaints, 96% of New York state’s complaints. Each complaint is legally supposed to be resolved in under 75 days, but NYC’s cases take 259 days on average. The penalty for such a failure? Nothing. These students deserve better. (Reema Amin for The City)

Interview: Meet Brenda Suchilt, the Newtown Creek Alliance’s new horticulturist. (Billy McEntee for Greenpointers)

Apartment Porn: A $12.75 million Cobble Hill townhouse with a vineyard-like garden that’s bigger than almost every bar with outdoor space, gated parking, and two wine cellars. One wine cellar? Please. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The best Vietnamese restaurants in NYC. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The secrets of the new Greenpoint public library. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The number of young children in NYCHA housing at risk of lead exposure is three times greater than previously thought, according to Bart Schwartz, the federal monitor overseeing the NYCHA. The city certified the number at 3,000 two years ago. The number is 9,000. Poisoning the children of the city will likely end up high on the list of Bill de Blasio’s legacy as mayor. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Speaking of Bill de Blasio’s accomplishments and legacy, the city is headed for the highest level of traffic deaths since the mayor took office, the third straight year of rising deaths, completely erasing any and all progress he could claim as part of his own Vision Zero program. This year includes two months of zero traffic fatalities due to the pandemic, it’s hard to imagine how high the body count would be without it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel has just reopened its pool-cuzzi and Runway Chalet at JFK airport. The pool purifies itself every 30 minutes and is kept at a cozy 95 degrees. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A look at the new public art available across Brooklyn. (Keira Wingate for Bklyner)

Three bars within the zoned shutdown areas in Brooklyn and Queens had their liquor licenses temporarily suspended for throwing illegal indoor parties. 30 Fantastic Bar in Sunset Park, Da Mikelle Palace in Forest Hills, and Wise Bar & Grill in Sheepshead Bay. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Before you feel bad for The Strand posting they may close (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan), let’s look a little deeper. The Strand fired union workers while accepting $1-2 million of PPP loans (Labor Notes) Owner Nancy Bass Wyder, who is married to Oregon Senator Ron Wyden, purchased $115,000 in Amazon stock in April and made an additional purchase of up to $200,000 in June. (Ed Lin for Barrons) The Upper West Side location was met with protests. (Carol Tannenhauser and Kate Koza for West Side Rag) On a micro scale, buying at The Strand instead of your neighborhood bookstore is no different than buying from Amazon.

On a micro scale, supporting The Strand over your neighborhood bookstore is akin to buying from Amazon instead of locally.

At this point, let’s celebrate that NYC isn’t the rattiest city in America. Los Angeles and Chicago are worse than we are and you take the wins where you can get them. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Times Square really wants you to visit. Their latest ploy to get you to the one place you never want to visit is the Taste of Times Square Week, which runs through October 30 and offers a $35 prix fixe menu at 20 different restaurants with an appetizer, main and dessert. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Shed in Hudson Yards has reopened with a solo exhibition by artist Howardena Pindell called Rope/Fire/Water, which explores the historical traumas of America, namely slavery, racism, and white supremacy. (Monika Hankova for Untapped New York)

An examination of how New York’s slavery history is still present all over the city. (Zachary Kussin for Untapped New York)

The Green-Wood Cemetery is hosting a Dia de los Muertos celebration all this week. (Dozier Hasty for Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Mapo Tofu in the city. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Michael for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for February 16, 2020 – The “Peanut Butter Bandit Needs to Be Caught” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Bernie Sanders gets the Bill de Blasio kiss of death, the cutest thing in the city, a 500% rent increase in Coney Island, the Amazon killer, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

What’s open and what’s closed on President’s Day. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Bernie Sanders campaign received the presidential kiss of death over the weekend: Bill de Blasio’s endorsement. De Blasio was, no doubt, looking for any excuse to leave NYC and jumped at the opportunity. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The subway is ubiquitious in the city, but at some point it needed to be built. The latest photo exhibition at the New York Transit Museum shows how the subway was built. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: For only $45 million, you can live like a Russian oligarch in the Plaza. The apartment used to be two separate apartments that were combined into one insane apartment covered in onyx and crystal. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Someone needs to stop the Peanut Butter Bandit. The worst person in the city hit the A train once more with the gooey atrocity on the poles of the train early Friday morning. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

He helped kill the Amazon HQ2 deal, and now he’s set his sights on making sure nothing like the Amazon deal ever happens again. Michael Gianaris wants to reform how the city gives tax breaks to giant companies. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s like a normal store, but it only sells flutes. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

JFK’s Terminal 4 will be getting a $3.8 billion makeover. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

It’s 3:30 am on a Wednesday and you desperately want pierogis, where will you go? Behind the scenes at Veselka, the Ukrainian restaurant that’s been part of the East Village since the 50s. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Despite early reporting, Governor Cuomo and President Trump’s meeting about the ban on New Yorkers from the Truster Traveler Program and giving the government access to New York’s DMV records was “productive,” but no solution was reached. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Caroline Baumann didn’t resign as director of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum out of nowhere, she was forced out after an investigation into her wedding found she violated policy when it came to acquiring her dress and venue. The Smithsonian isn’t run by the government, but is partially funded by the government and has a similar conflict of interest policy. (Robin Pogrebin for NY Times)

The ax is finally falling, all Barney’s stores will close at the end of the month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Only three restaurants in the city were closed last week by the Department of Health, but one of them is the city’s newest member of the 100+ point violation club. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The NYC condoms have a new wrapper, but here’s something that’s a little confusing: The name of the wrapper design is the “NYC Legend XL.” While it sounds like this is the magnum of free condoms, there’s no indication if this is for your average or not-so-average New Yorker (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man shot in the face by an ICE agent last week plans to sue the agency and is calling for an investigation of the incident. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Should the subway be free? According to City Councilmember Mark Treyger, the answer is yes. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Black Lives Matter President Anthony Beckford is the latest to stand up in support City Councimember Mark Treyger’s call to make transit free to use. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

He’s not alone. Meet the state’s assemblymember hopefuls who agree the fairest fare is no fare at all. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Meet Pancakes, the Staten Island Zoo’s brand newborn sloth, the cutest thing in the city. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The NYPD reportedly issued a subpoena to Twitter requesting access to the account of NY Post police bureau chief Tina Moore, citing the Patriot Act as their justification to try to find leaks within the department. The effort was lead by new police commissioner Dermot Shea. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s like a grocery store, but it’s an art installation where everything is made from plastic bags. The Plastic Bag Store, from Robin Frohardt, will be viewable in Times Square on March 1, coinciding with the state’s plastic bag ban. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A 14-year-old boy suspected of fatally stabbing a Tessa Majors to death in a Morningside Park robbery last December has been indicted on murder charges. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Rent increases are a part of life in the city, but a 500% rent increase is reprehensible. The Lola Star Gift Shop on the boardwalk in Coney Island faces a 500% increase in her rent from Luna Park and the company’s owner’s Zamperla. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

22 trendy restaurants you can still get into. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!