The Briefly for April 17, 2020 – The “Every Hour is Happy Hour When Time is Meaningless” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city’s budget goes wartime, the best brunch options for delivery, high end stores are boarding up their windows, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 51˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 41˚ High: 63˚

4K VIdeo: Walking through Times Square. (ActionKid)

In honor of his late grandmother, Michael Che will be paying May’s rent for the 160 apartments in the NYCHA building where she lived. (Ron Dicker for HuffPost)

Rent in the city dropped 6% since the start since March 22. (Localize.City)

Tenant groups are set for a rent strike on May 1. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Sick of sourdough? Here are seven bread options for you to try. (Sam O’Brien for Atlas Obscura)

The allure and anxiety of drinking along in quarantine. (Alice Feriring for Grub Street)

What time is it okay to start drinking alcohol? It’s hard to tell because time has no meaning anymore. (Shayla Love for VICE)

Slowly, the city’s government is finding a way to move forward. The City Council and the Landmarks Preservation Commission will start meeting digitally next week. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Taxi drivers were struggling before the pandemic. With COVID-19, they face even more difficulties. (Estefania Hernandez for NY1)

Are you willing to go to a live sport without a vaccine? 61% of sports fans and 71% of people overall are unwilling to go until there’s a vaccine. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Keith McNally’s Lucky Strike on Grand Street is closed for good. Is it the first domino to fall when it comes to independent restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

From former Roberta’s and Speedy Romeo chef Robert Guimond comes Public Display of Affection, a wood-fired pizza spot in Park Slope on Union Street. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio released a revised “wartime” budget on Thursday, with a $6 billion reduction. “A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor when speaking about his budget. Last year he said, “Placard abuse erodes faith in government and has no place in our city.” This year he’s eliminating the Placard Abuse Enforcement Team. Activist Charles Komanoff has a different idea: Disband the Collision Investigation Squad instead. (Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog)

Workers at two luxury Manhattan residential buildings, The Chamberlain and 432 West 52nd Street, walked out on the job, claiming poor work conditions and harassment. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

It’s easy to think that artists should use this time to create something new, but the reality of the moment can be much heavier than imaginable. This is Rori Nogee’s story of going from having six jobs and a show ready to open on Restaurant Row to a 100% loss of income and opportunities. (Rori Nogee for New York Cliche)

A look at what might be New York City’s last open bookstore. (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

I first saw it from a friend’s story on Instagram, the boarded-up stores in Manhattan. It’s a pandemic, not The Purge. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Pizza bagels? Pizza rolls? Please. Forget it, now pizza cupcakes are ready for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Tired of the same old views? Check out the livestreams of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“It should be stated bluntly that traveling on the New York subway system is now one of the more frightful experiences Western civilization has to offer on a regular basis. The experience is not only intolerable. It is also a daily advertisement for the brutish sensibilities and shallow brainpans of the people who now control the city.” “Why We Hate the Subways,” despite being timely, was written in 1977. (Alexander Cockburn for Village Voice)

Thank goodness for people like the non-profit Greenpoint Cats, who have been doing their best to look after bodega cats left behind or abandoned as bodegas close. (Aaron Simon for Greenpointers)

10 great sandwiches still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found floating in the East River near Roosevelt Island. (Emily Davenpont for QNS)

New York remains on PAUSE until at least May 15. (Kathleen Culliton for PAtch)

Reports of domestic violence have dropped dramatically across the city, and that’s not a good thing. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

Watch New Yorkers sing “New York, New York” out their windows after Thursday’s 7 pm clap, a project of the Peace of Heart Choir. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In what started as a cheap way to live, an $800-a-month illegal bedroom in Bushwick with no windows now sounds more like a cruel experiment. (Trey Taylor for Curbed)

Do you miss Shake Shack? Here’s the recipe for the ShackBurger and ShackSauce. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The best brunch options in NYC available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for April 16, 2020 – The “Quarantine Cannibal of New York City” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The most books read under quarantine, Cuomo forces masks in grocery stores, the most expensive home in Brooklyn history, the status of your stimulus, & more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 49˚
Clear throughout the day.

It looks like we may have a plan to reopening the state. This week the state is starting with 2,000 finger prick antibody tests a day and asked the FDA to expedite tests for 100,000 New Yorkers a day. That really makes the city’s plan of producing 50,000 tests a week seem puny. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sometime you just wanna hear someone talk. Check out there oral histories of different NYC neighborhoods. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A guide to restaurants that are now selling groceries. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A conversation between historian Daniel Okrent and Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman about the art deco of Rockefeller Center. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The New York City quarantine cannibal allegedly killed and partially ate his father. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Are those free books on the sidewalk safe from germs? (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

What are New Yorkers reading in quarantine? According to the list of the most checked out books from the NYPL, it’s Becoming by Michelle Obama. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

At $20.3 million, it’s the most expensive home ever sold in Brooklyn. The view is pretty good. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

This morning, Mayor de Blasio expressed a desire in grocery stores to force shoppers to wear masks. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Flexing his muscle, Governor Cuomo made it happen, even if there is no fine for violating the order. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

President Cuomo? According to the betting markets, there’s a 3% chance. (Jordan Muller for Politico)

RIP Jimmy Webb, the longtime manager and buyer for the East Village’s Trash & Vaudeville. The cause of death was cancer. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The MTA initially asked for $3.7 billion to help keep the agency running, turns out the amount of money needed is actually closer to $12 billion. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’re a nurse, you shouldn’t have to sue your employer in order to get personal protective equipment in a pandemic, and yet here we are. The New York State Nurses Association is filing three lawsuits against the Montefiore Health System and Westchester Medical Center for not following guidance from the state’s health department. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

Where’s your stimulus payment? There’s a tool to check your status. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Pity Reverend Franklin Graham, who is “being harassed” by New Yorkers because he previously said that homosexuals will burn in the “flames of hell,” described Islam as “evil,” and railed against the “transgender lie.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

What’s worse than dog runs and playgrounds closed temporarily? How about no beaches open all summer? It’s a possibility. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

In what could be the worst economic crisis since the 70s, the city could be looking at 475,000 job losses and nearly $10 billion in lost revenue. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

An MIT study argues New York City’s public transit system was a “major disseminator” of novel coronavirus and the spread was made worse by decisions to cut service. The MTA disagrees. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s it like to fly into LaGuardia? Ever been the only person on a commercial flight? (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Kudos to Ponyboy, which is staying creative by pairing their bottled cocktails with labels from street artist Gazoo. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Thanks to reader @leecohen1 for today’s featured photo in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park.

The Briefly for March 17, 2020 – The “Order A Cocktail With Your Take Out” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor was forced into making the decision to close the schools, Barclays Center workers will be paid during the NBA shut down, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 54˚
Light rain in the morning.

Ample Hills Creamery filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, citing cost overruns on its Red Hook factory. Ample Hills has taken $12 million in investments since 2015. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

A woman who was handcuffed by the NYPD during active labor before her son’s birth, as well immediately following delivery, has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the city, saying the incident made her feel “less than human.” (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

An alternate subway map from 1939, which included a plan for the D train to go to Staten Island and the N train going to LaGuardia. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)


Here is a crowdsourced document with resources for everyone ranging from medical and mental health resources, virtual tours, places to donate, etc. (Thanks to Ariana for sending this in)

Caveat, the nerdy and quirky venue on Clinton St in Manhattan, will be streaming its programming this week, including Let’s Play with Comedians with Mark Vigeant tonight (Tuesday) at 7pm. (Caveat)

Tonight Puccini’s “La Bohème” will be streaming for free from the Met Opera tonight. You can catch Bizet’s Carmen until 3:30pm. (Met Opera)

Veselka in the East Village is offering buy one get one for Tuesday. Give them a call if you’re interested. (@veselkanyc)

The city is offering grab and go lunches for students and to aid in remote learning the city is providing as many laptops as possible to households with no internet connectivity. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What you need to know about NYC’s school closures. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Wu-Tang has some advice about how to Protect Ya Neck Against Coronavirus. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Most co-working facilities are closed. WeWork remains open. But why? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

John Oliver is on hiatus, but not without putting the entirety of his last show for HBO on YouTube. (Last Week Tonight)

Mayor de Blasio has done some stupid things in his time as mayor, but this might take the cake. Despite everything going on, this dope was driven 12 miles to the YMCA in Park Slope to get one last workout session in, despite telling the city to assume that we have already been exposed to the virus. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The response to the pandemic shows us all what is possible but just doesn’t happen. Yes, bars and restaurants are shut down, but now you can order a cocktail to go with your meal. Anything that’s sold behind the bar can also be ordered. This is a good moment to tell you to order directly from the restaurant. Yes, Seamless is easier, but we are in a moment where every small business in your neighborhood needs every dime possible to stay afloat. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The impact of COVID-19 on the city’s economy is likely to be worse than 9/11 with over half a million people losing jobs in the tourism and hospitality sectors alone. (Patrick McGreen for NY Times)

The city’s nightlife industry accounts for $35 billion in revenue, with workers earning $13 billion. There is no timeline for reopening. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s crackdown on electric bikes is on hold. Now would be an excellent time to make them legal instead of illegal, but accepted. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Workers at the Barclay Center will be paid lost wages during the NBA shutdown. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Vegan)

Photos: The Gotham Bar and Grill closed for good on Saturday Night, and they celebrated with a party full of a lack of irresponsible social distancing and a disregard for the long-term consequences for it. (Gary He for Eater)

You’re home, you have your favorite restaurants or bars on the mind. If you’re looking for a way to show your support, get a gift certificate. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

As we learn, the mayor didn’t come to the decision to close schools and bars and gyms himself, he didn’t trust the advice of the people closest to him either, he was forced into the decisions by his staff and a rebellious teacher’s union. (Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A Department of Correction staffer who tested positive for COVID-19 died on Sunday evening, one of seven deaths of coronavirus patients reported in New York state so far. They supposedly had limited contact with people in custody. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Photos: Some photos of Lower Manhattan looking very empty. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: This is what Carroll Gardens looks like during the pandemic. Hopefully showing people what these areas look like without people in them reduces anyone’s need to go to these places. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking)

Are cancelations newsworthy anymore? Reading through an endless list of things closing or being postponed shows just how much is happening in the city on a regular basis and none of it is happening this year. The Met Gala has been postponed indefinitely. (Vanessa Friedman and Jessica Testa for NY Times)

Get your grocery shopping done and don’t wait until the store’s last listed hours on their Google Maps listing. Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Stop&Shop, and Aldi are reducing hours. As one Trader Joe’s employee put it, it’s like the day before Superstorm Sandy every day for the last three weeks. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Despite everything else being up in the air, there have not been any service changes for the MTA. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the evolving and regularly infinite job of a group station manager for the MTA in the time of a pandemic. (Andy Newman and Earl Wilson)

The Brooklyn Arts Council organized a digital booklet of resources on healthcare, newly available funding, organizing tips, and other critical information for artists. (The Brooklyn Reader)

New York may soon need 18,000 ventilators, right now it’s 15,783 short. The federal government has a stockpile of ventilators, but President Trump’s literally response to a call for them was “try getting it yourselves.” Encouraging. (Brian M. Rosenthal and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A statewide suspension of evictions is in place indefinitely, as all non-essential functions of the courts have been postponed until further notice. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Judges, ICE prosecutors, and immigration lawyers are all asking for the same thing. Shut down the immigration courts. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

18 picks for restaurants offering new takeout and delivery options. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!