The Briefly for February 22, 2019 – The “Our City’s Parks Are No Longer Rocking” Edition

The 7 train is literally falling apart, the mayor announces a plan to fight placard abuse, the BQX takes another hit, the YMCA, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Nearly every subway line has closures this weekend. (6sqft)

The 7 train is falling apart, literally. A piece of the train tracks fell from its elevated track and impaled an SUV through its windshield. The driver wasn’t injured, but holy shit, is anywhere near the subway safe anymore? (Curbed)

Why we rent and not buy our homes. (StreetEasy)

The mayor announced a goal of moving the parking placard system to license plates from the laminated placards on dashboards. Unless the NYPD enforces the rules, this whole thing is pointless. (Politico)

The NYPD used to hand out hundreds of summonses for sex in the city’s public parks. Last year? Zero. Are New Yorkers no longer horny on main? (NY Times)

The mayor promised serious consequences if yeshivas continue to bar Department of Education inspectors from their buildings. The deadline passed and the city is still negotiating with the schools. (Gothamist)

A map of the mega projects changing the city. (Curbed)

A look inside the new Webster Hall, but no photos of the new bathrooms. (NY Times)

Webster Hall will reopen on May 1 with Patti Smith. (Time Out)

Two more suspects were arrested in connection to the MS-13 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue subway shooting. (NY Post)

The best parodies are barely noticeable, which means you could miss these amazing MTA parody ads if you don’t have a sharp eye. (Bklyner)

Brooklyn President Eric Adams is urging New Yorkers to join their Neighborhood Advisory Boards in order to distribute Community Service Block Grants, a program which dates back to Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The capital of President Trump’s immigration crackdown is New York City with an 88.2% increase in arrests. (Patch)

A list of the 47 hate groups active and operating in the city, double the number from ten years ago. (Patch)

What the hell is the NYPD doing blasting a hip-hop diss track outside the Marcus Garvey Village? A spokesperson said the officers “used it as a way to start a conversation with young men on the street.” Right. (Gothamist)

An 8-month-old in a stroller rolled onto the tracks of the 72nd Street 1 train. Her father jumped onto the tracks and brought her back to safety. The baby went to the hospital with a bump on her head. (amNY)

What’s special about the McBurney Y in Chelsea? Have you ever spelled out “Y.M.C.A.” at a wedding? (Gothamist)

Despite no one wanting him to run, Mayor de Blasio continues to flirt with a presidential run with a trip to Iowa this weekend. (NY Post)

The AARP supports congestion pricing, undercutting critics who say seniors will be hurt by the tolls. (Streetsblog)

Joe Crowley, defeated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is also leaving his position as head of the Queens Democratic Party. June Bunch will serve as the interim chair until a new leader is selected. (NY Post)

Nomkiki Konst, the TV-pundit-turned-candidate for Public Advocate, gets the profile treatment from Politico. (Politico)

If you’ve got three and a half hours to kill, here are 15 minutes interviews with 14 of the city’s Public Advocate candidates. (Gotham Gazette)

Ten candidates for Public Advocate on congestion pricing, safety, transportation policy, bike lanes, and the job in general. (Streetsblog)

An Amazon-less city might be the death-blow to the BQX streetcar. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Just in time for the weekend, 12 hot new brunch places. (Eater)

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The Briefly for September 18, 2018 – NYC vs DOJ, a Seven Alarm Fire, the U.N. and More

Midtown will slow down even more once the U.N. is in town, the DOJ comments about safe injection sites, de Blasio deflects school bus complaints and more.

What you need to know about the United Nations general assembly that’s starting this week.

The worst days of the year for driving in Manhattan aren’t Christmas or Thanksgiving, it’s when the U.N. is in session. In Midtown, traffic slows from the average of 4.7mph to 3mph and the city’s new message is simple: “Your trip through Midtown will take three times as long.”

The bridge that connects Brooklyn Bridge Park and the Brooklyn Heights is indefinitely closed. It seems that high moisture levels are causing the problem with the bridge. That’s outside. Near the water.

The creepy LinkNYC/ice cream jingle mystery is one step closer to being solved.

A seven alarm fire broke out at Kings Plaza Mall’s parking garage. Avon Stephens, 23, was arrested for causing damage to over 100 Mercedes-Benzes. A local dealership was storing cars there, not everyone who goes to Kings Plaza drives a Benz. No one suffered life-threatening injuries. He said he was sorry.

Rose III by Isa Genzken is a new 26-foot-tall sculpture of a rose in Zuccotti Park.

Cuomo defeated Nixon and Gothamist asks “Are the subways screwed forever?

Joe Crowley will remain chairman of the Queens Democratic Party after being defeated by Amexandria Ocasio-Cortez. He’s remained the chairman since 2006.

A 33-year-old man was found dead at Union Square after attempting to walk between train cars while moving.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back on Instagram, here comes Human’s Best Friend. It’s an Instagram bait installation, but it’s for dogs.

What’s going on with Australian coffee culture in the city?

The man behind the Society for Indecency to Naked Animals, Alan Abel, has earned himself a second obituary in The New York Times 38 years after his first.

The Justice Department is calling NYC’s proposed safe injection sites a “violation of the Controlled Substances Act.” This is coming to a head after a letter from state Assembly member Nicole Malliotakis (R-Staten Island) was sent to the DOJ.

Mayor de Blasio is blaming bus companies for the 82,225 complaints the DOE has already received in the first two weeks of school, but no action has yet been taken by his administration.


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The Briefly for August 15, 2018 – Hang Out with Dogs, El Chapo Shuts Down the Brooklyn Bridge, and More

Every time El Chapo is in court, the Brooklyn Bridge has to be shut down, the Pulaski Bridge is closing at night, the MTA wants body cameras, the insane parking in Bushwick, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Hang out with dogs without being life partners with one, a guide from Brokelyn.

If you want to support former-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen, you can rent an apartment from him for $25,000 a month.

Just in case getting around the city was too easy, the Pulaski Bridge between Brooklyn and Queens will be closed to cars, buses, pedestrians, and bikes between midnight and 5am every weekday until September 7.

City Council Member Helen Rosenthal is calling on the city to install a two-way protected bike lane on Central Park West after a garbage truck driver struck and killed 23-year-old Australian tourist Madison Lyden.

According to the DOT “132,253 drivers have been observed through Friday, August 10th exceeding the speed limit by more than 10 miles per hour during school hours.” The city can no longer issue tickets to people who speed in school zones with cameras because the State Senate has been impotent to reauthorize the Every School Speed Camera Act.

The sets of yellow footprints on a C train have been seen for the last three months have not inspired confidence in the MTA’s ability to clean its subway cars.

Despite the raising minimum wage and displayed calorie counts, fast food restaurants like McDonalds and Chick-Fil-A are thriving throughout the city.

Despite his primary loss to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, New York’s weird election laws will ensure that Joe Crowley’s name is still on the ballot for the general election.

Candytopia is the latest eye-rolling Instagram-trap dressed up like an interactive art installation.

Did Andrew Cuomo promise Donald Trump he wouldn’t run against him in 2020? Cuomo says no, Trump says yes.

Six unique New York stories, from Great Big Story.

Ever wonder how the dinosaurs in the Museum of Natural History get clean? Wonder no more!

An unidentified body was discovered in the East River near the Williamsburg Bridge. NYPD are investigating, but have not released any other information.

Agostinho Sinclair, 41, of Far Rockaway, was arrested on charges including reckless endangerment, leaving the scene of an accident and aggravated unlicensed operator after hitting an 11-year-old boy on his bicycle on Monday. The boy is in stable condition.

A female professor at NYU has been suspended for the coming academic year after an 11-month Title IX investigation found that she had sexually harassed, both physically and verbally, one of her former male students.

El Chapo is being held in a high-security federal prison in Lower Manhattan, but each time he has to appear in court in Brooklyn, the entire Brooklyn Bridge needs to be cleared of all cars. When the trial begins in November, both sides of the bridge may become the city’s latest commuting nightmare.

The MTA is calling for voluntary body cameras to help identify people who assault MTA workers. Bus and subway worker harassment has increased 11% in the last year, which included the recent story of a woman attacking a subway conductor.

Why bother with alternate side parking rules when you can just park directly in the middle of the street?


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