The Briefly for June 12, 2019 – The “You’re A Landmark if You Like It or Not” Edition

The state’s legislature agreed to rent reforms, the best restaurants of 2019 so far, Cuomo gets serious about MTA overtime, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The state legislature agreed on a package of bills aimed at strengthening tenants rights and rent laws. The bills also would become permanent, so no more regular lobbying from the real estate industry to let the laws lapse when their expiration dates come. (NY Times)

Some of the rent reforms include ending vacancy decontrol, eliminating the ability of landlords to raise rents on vacancies, it would retain preferential rents for the life of a tenant, and dramatically limit improvement charges. (Politico)

Cool down with a look at the ice creams of Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

The Strand Bookstore is now a city landmark and as you might expect, despite a long campaign from owner Nancy Wyden against the idea. (Gothamist)

“My friend later told me that most of the businesses in this area dealt in cash only…so guns were pretty much everywhere…in every store.” New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Your regular reminder that you can check the city’s beaches for too much poop (how much poop is too much?) on the internet. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wanted to live in the Waldorf Astoria (and have more money than you know what to do with), the condos will be hitting the market this fall. (Curbed)

New York is the third most fun state in the country, behind Florida and California. The thing holding it back? It’s not the ratpocalypse or the mountains of trash on the sidewalks, it’s the high costs. (Patch)

Hundreds rallied after the death of Layleen Polanco in Rikers Island last week. She was being held and her bail was set at $500. The city is looking into the case, where she was sent into solitary confinement despite a history of seizures. (Gothamist)

Catch a sneak peek at NYC’s largest rainbow “flag”. (HuffPost)

The helicopter pilot who crashed into a building on Monday was lost in the rain and fog. Investigators are looking into how the craft ended up where it did instead of an airport in New Jersey. (NY Times)

FAA officials said that Timothy McCormack did not have the proper license to be operating the helicopter in low-visibility conditions. (HuffPost)

Congressmember Carolyn Maloney wants to ban all nonessential helicopter flights from Manhattan. The city banned rooftop helicopter landings after a 1977 crash on the roof of the MetLife building. (The Villager)

In the 1977 crash, five people were killed when an idling helicopter tipped over, four were on the roof, one was on the street below. (Gothamist)

The High Line’s final section is open. The Spur is the home of the High Line Plinth, a site dedicated to a rotating series of artists. (6sqft)

Watch the complete debate for Queens DA. (NY1)

During the debate, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz was the favored punching bag of the seven candidates. (Politico)

We could be seeing the beginning of the end of the measles epidemic in Brooklyn. Everyone celebrate by making sure you’re vaccinated. (amNY)

New York state is one of three that doesn’t allow paid surrogacy, but even with a progressive legislature, it isn’t certain to be abolished. Abolishment of the prohibition has the governor’s support and a bill passed the state senate, but it is stalled in the assembly, where it has split progressive support. (NY Times)

The “Flower Flashes” by Lewis Miller Design might be the city’s most wholesome vandalism the city has ever seen. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo plans on hiring the former federal prosecutor that convicted former Speaker of the State Assembly, Sheldon Siver, to investigate a former federal prosecutor to look into the overtime issue plaguing the MTA. (Politico)

Remember that T-Mobile/Spring merger? New York is suing to block it from happening. (Patch)

Riverside Park is getting a new skate park at 108th St. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Riverside at W 108th has a history as a skatepark. The Riverside Skate Park was the first “solid” skate park in the city, originally built by NYC skateboarding pioneer Andy Kessler. This piece in the Times from 2013 shows the history of the community’s dedication to maintaining it in honor of Kessler’s vision. (NY Times)

A guide to the pizza ovens of Brooklyn, illustrated by Koren Shadmi. (NY Times)

Jon Stewart, the conscience of New Yorkers, took to Congress on Tuesday to rightfully shame our government for not fully funding the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund. (Patch)

John Jay College is being sued by students who allege the college botched sexual misconduct allegations against four professors, called “The Swamp.” (Patch)

The best restaurants of 2019 so far, according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema. (Eater)

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The Briefly for October 8, 2018 – Rats Coming Out of Our Drains and Other True Horrors

The Central Park zombie raccoon outbreak spread to Prospect Park, a private ferry to deal with the L train shutdown, Sharon Needles is ready for Halloween, and more in the daily NYC news digest.

We all have enough to worry about before we add “rats coming out of the drains” to the list, but here we are. (Curbed)

The sky is literally falling at the Bedford Ave L station, but the MTA says not to be alarmed by the chunks of debris form the ceiling. (Gothamist)

The zombie raccoon outbreak in Central Park has spread to Prospect Park. Late stages of distemper can cause brain damage and cause raccoons to wander aimlessly and become aggressive. Pet owners are advised to be alert and keep your pet leashed at all times. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 72nd St B/C subway station reopened with mosaics by Yoko Ono. (6sqft)

It’s cuffing season, and Bushwick Daily is here for you. A list of budget-friendly romantic date spots in Bushwick.

An $80 million renovation is headed for the Manhattan Bridge and will continue through 2021. (6sqft)

The 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund is in danger of running out of funds before the program ends in 2020. Anyone who lived, worked, or studied south of Canal is urged to register with the fund even if you haven’t been diagnosed with a 9/11 related illness. (Downtown Express)

Meet Concetta Anne Bencivenga, the new director of the New York Transit Museum. (6sqft)

Norwood Heights is expected to be NYC’s hot neighborhood…in 50 years. (Welcome2TheBronx)

“I never thought I would live in a time with such constant outrage and what the country is going through now.” Deborah Kass’s OY/YO sculpture was created in 2015, which seems like an eternity ago. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The ice skating rink at 30 Rock opens today. It’s been on your NYC “to do” list for years, right? (6sqft)

Get your eye roll ready. SW/TCH is a private 150 person luxury ferry that will operate during the L train shutdown. (Gothamist)

The Department of Justice dropped its case against Pablo Villavicencio, the man who was detained by ICE at Fort Hamilton earlier this year.

17 cozy bars and restaurants in Cobble Hill. (Eater)

How the brownstone became the city’s classic apartment. (StreetEasy)

No matter the situation, the mayor saying “I’m in the middle of doing my workout” to a homeless advocate is a bad look. (HuffPo)

“With so much in the news about sexual misconduct in the past week, you may find yourself facilitating discussions on the topic.” John Jay distributed guidelines for teaching students about its own sex scandal. (NY Post)

Sharon Needles’s annual Halloween show starts this week and she sat down with Chelsea Now to talk about her annual Halloween traditions, favorite costumes, the future of drag, and more.


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The Briefly for October 1, 2018 – Highlights From de Blasio’s Released Emails

Zombie raccoons remain a problem, Brooklyn Democratic County Committee is struggling, the city’s plans for a hostile MTA takeover, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

But his emails! Mayor de Blasio lost a court battle against NY1 and The New York Post and released thousands of emails between his administration and outside advisors. Now the “biased and ridiculous corporate media” (a de Blasio quote) are going to have a field day. The mayor had to be reminded to laugh at Jon Stewart’s jokes when he went on The Daily Show. >He orders his Starbucks double espressos with FOUR sugars! He has three hours a day set aside for working out. Most of that time is driving to and from the Park Slope YMCA and changing clothes (he has one full hour to do that).

A guide to finding fall foliage in Central Park. (6sft)

The Brooklyn Democratic County Committee is struggling to keep up its ways of old school backroom politics under the weight of current wave of young democrats. (Gothamist)

10 tips to ride the subway like a pro. #10 is “get a bike.” (Curbed)

The “zombie” raccoons of Central Park are back in the news with the death count being at least 176. (NY Post)

There was no gunshot at the Global Citizen Festival, but a popping champagne bottle made the crowd panic like there was. (NY Times)

It used to be called Satan’s Circus, for the cathouses, brothels, and houses of ill repute, but today we call it Flatiron. (Town & Village)

Mayor de Blasio threatened of a political takeover of the MTA while speaking at the Texas Tribute Festival in Austin, TX. (NY Post)

#WhyIDidntReport protests signs have begun popping up in different subway signs across the city. (Gothamist)

CitiBike owes the city $1.4 million due to the low number of bikes currently available, but the city has no plans of collecting it. (Streetsblog)

The first public meeting about the proposed temporary removal of the Brooklyn Heights Promenade went exactly as you might imagine it would. (Brownstoner)

19 standout restaurants in Bushwick. (Eater)

Guy Sands, owner of Sands’ on Grand St in Williamsburg continues to insist that he is not a nazi or White Supremacist despite his membership in the Proud Boys, a group with the designation of a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Veterinarian Andres Lopez Elorez plead guilty to using Labrador retriever puppies to smuggle liquid heroin into JFK from 2004 to 2005. (NY Post)

The Mile-Long Opera: a biography of 7 o’clock” takes place along The High Line starting Wednesday featuring over 1,000 performers. (NY Times)

The John Jay College professors accused of creating a prostitution and drug ring were given $500k to study prostitution. Seems like they were good students. (NY Post)

Go back in time with the 75-year-old color photo of Broadway. (Viewing NYC)


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