The Briefly for September 23, 2019 – The “A Failed Presidential Candidate” Edition

Another cyclist was killed by a driver, this week’s late-night subway disruptions, five major problems waiting for the mayor, the best dive bars and more in today’s daily NYC news update

This week’s late-night subway disruptions are bringing the pain. Make sure to check before you stay out late. (Subway Weekender)

The mayor is no longer a failing presidential candidate, he’s a failed presidential candidate. RIP the de Blasio Campaign 2019 – 2019. (Politico)

Now that the mayor decided to do his job full-time again, here are five major problems waiting for him. (NY Times)

The 21st bicyclist to be killed by a driver on New York’s streets is 14-year-old Mario Valenzuela. Mario was killed by a 33-year-old man who was driving a private sanitation truck making a right turn on Borden Avenue in Queens. (LIC Post)

Shore Parkway is getting a protected bike lane, despite Community Board 11’s protests. Amid a record year for cyclists killed by drivers, neighborhoods who push back against lanes using thinly-veiled excuses are making a clear decision between the lives of their neighbors and the desire to drive a car however they please. (The City)

Are you ready for the MTA to upgrade its signals? Are you ready for extensive disruptions while it does so? We’re talking line shut down on nights and weekends on the 4/5/6, N/W, A/C, G, E, and F lines. There’s always the bus… (amNY)

Here are the first 48 subway stations getting accessibility upgrades as outlined in the 2020 – 2024 capital plan. (Streetsblog)

The Park Slope Food Coop received more media coverage than it deserves, but this story about how the super liberals of the Park Slope Food Coop have fought against unionization of its full-time workers is an eye-opener. (NY Times)

A sneak peek inside the new library in Hunters Point. (Untapped Cities)

Five Gowanus sites are being considered for landmark status this week as preservationists are pushing to protect as much of the neighborhood as possible ahead of a possible rezoning. (Brownstoner)

In the battle between Industry City and City Councilmember Carlow Menchaca over plans for the site’s future, Industry City blinked and will delay their plans for expansion after acquiescing to Menchaca’s concerns. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Whoever is the monster that stole this child’s saxophone, you need to return it. (Gothamist)

One of the hottest 2020 elections in New York will be the retiring Rep. José Serrano’s congressional seat in the South Bronx. (Politico)

Holtermann’s Bakery, in business for over 150 years in Staten Island, gets the Atlas Obscura nod for its timeless desserts, calling out its “real deal” Charlotte Russe. (Atlas Obscura)

Uber is suing the city for its cap on the company’s growth and a law passed in August which restricts the amount of time a driver can drive in Manhattan without a fare, calling the laws “arbitrary and capricious.” (Politico)

Congratulations to Uma Smith of Bed-Stuy, who won a James Dyson award for her invention Cocoon, a pillow that can be placed under someone’s head during a seizure that also contacts bystanders on how they can help. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

If you’ve ridden the Long Island Rail Road this month, there’s a chance you’ve been exposed to the measles. (Gothamist)

What to eat and do in Greenpoint. (amNY)

Here are the restaurants the Department of Health shut down this week for violations, including Hook’d on the Hudson, leading the pack with a jaw-dropping 141 points. (Patch)

The best gluten-free pizza on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The Village Halloween parade is returning this year with the theme “Wild Thing!” Let’s try harder with the costume creativity this year, shall we? (Brooklyn Vegan)

An apartment with a pool? Tired. An apartment with an indoor wave pool? Wired! (Viewing NYC)

The Times goes behind the scenes on their 20 photographers/65 block parties magazine feature. (NY Times)

Have you seen the house on the top of a building on the Upper West Side? (I Love the Upper West Side)

There was a minor fire in Terminal 5. The damage was minimal and no one was injured. (Gothamist)

The best dive bars in NYC. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for July 15, 2019 – The “I’ve Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway” Edition

Our absent mayor was absent during the blackout, the reinvention of the rainbow cookie, de Blasio hires his son to save his 0% campaign, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The late-night disruptions this week are minimal unless you’re on the L train in Brooklyn. Service is suspended between Lorimer and Broadway Junction. (Subway Weekender)

A gallery of how broadway shows and professional musicians handled the blackout, along with New Yorkers stepping up to direct traffic, and a video of the lights turning back on. (Huff Post)

When the power went out, the first question was “why?” The second question was where the hell is our mayor? (NY Times)

Where was the mayor? He has an average 0% support and yet he was spending the day in Iowa. (Politico)

When he was asked on the air on CNN at 9 pm, two hours after the blackout began the mayor said he was still weighing his options. (Politico)

While a portion of the city sat in darkness, it was Corey Johnson that provided public leadership on the news, Twitter, and during Sunday’s press conference. Our absentee mayor continued to be absent. (Chelsea Now)

Want to live in a city where you can save money for a rainy day? Too bad, you live in New York. (CNBC)

If you’re the person that’s been praying for consistent hot temperatures, this is the week where all your friends will give you the side-eye. Welcome to the first sweltering week of summer. (amNY)

The state legislature passed the Utility Responsibility Bill and now it waits for the governor’s signature. The bill would protect homeowners if any damage was done to their property by utility companies. (QNS)

Do you know the difference between a studio and a one-bedroom apartment? Did you know a bedroom needs to be a minimum of 80 square feet with a ceiling height minimum of eight feet? (StreetEasy)

R. Kelly has been arrested and indicted of racketeering and violating federal anti-sex trafficking laws. These are in addition to the charges he’s facing in Illinois. He faces up to 70 years in prison. (Patch)

The rainbow cookie is already perfect, but some chefs can’t leave well-enough alone. (Eater)

Whoever the monster is that stole the key to the city received by Allie Long, a member of the US Women’s National Team, understand that you have made very powerful enemies. (Gothamist)

Your landlord can threaten to let your apartment fall into disrepair, but they can’t actually do that. Learn about the warranty of habitability and what it means for your apartment. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health includes “BKLYN Wild” in the Time Out Market, which broke the 100 violation point mark with a 102 score. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, who has insisted that he is not in control of the MTA, has they need you to adopt or foster an animal. (amNY)

This Saturday is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon and the city is celebrating multiple ways. (Gothamist)

Inside a mostly abandoned mall in Queens, Board of Elections worker are counting out the fate of the Queens District Attorney’s office. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit is challenging the legality of the “spot rezoning” that was necessary to allow the 80 Flatbush development project a reality. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Abel Cedeno says he had been bullied for being gay, took the stand in his own defense at his manslaughter trial for the murder of two of his high school classmates with a knife. (NY Times)

The city unveiled its plans to protect the east side of Manhattan from the Lower East Side to 25th St with the design of the East River Park. The East Side Coastal Resiliency Project’s walls and design would protect the area from a 16 foot level of sea rise, which is the “100-year flood + waves” level. (Curbed)

A human leg was found in a channel in the waters of Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you think you apply for affordable housing in the city, registration is a fairly simple process. (Curbed)

The city council’s Committee on Small Business is calling on Letitia James’s office to look at the settlement agreement that allowed Grub Hub to buy Seamless in 2013 in light of the reports about Grub Hub’s business tactics. (Grub Street)

JetBlue installed Does Starbucks sell newspapers? If you answered no, you’ll soon be proven right because the company announced that they will stop selling The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and USA Today at its 8,600 locations nationwide. (NY Times)

RIP Hector Figueroa, former president of the Service Employees International Union and a key player in the fight for a $15 minimum wage. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio is polling at a 0% average in the Democrat presidential primary. Will hiring his son help his campaign? It literally couldn’t hurt it. (NY Times)

A preliminary report is suggesting that the impending MTA overhaul reduce the number of groups within the organization from 40 into six departments to centralize and simplify. The MTA’s board is expected to vote on a final version of the plan on the 24th. (amNY)

The President’s ICE enforcement action started on Saturday in the city, but early reports indicate that no one opened their doors for ICE and as a result, no one was detained. (amNY)

The race to replace José E. Serrano after he steps down as a result of a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis will be contended by Ruben Diaz Sr, an openly homophobic city councilperson, and Ritchie J Torres, the first openly gay person to hold office in the Bronx. (NY Times)

Need a late-night fix and you already had pizza for lunch? A list of late-night delivery spots that aren’t just pizza. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 26, 2019 – The “Hey Chicago, Do You Have Any Ideas?” Edition

Bed bugs on Broadway, the MTA asks Chicago for help, subway ridership continues to decline, the history of the best $1 pizza, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Governors Island is getting a new arts center in an old munitions warehouse. If you’ve been to the island before, it’s the building near the Manhattan ferry landing with public bathrooms. (Curbed)

An investigation has found credible allegations of sexual misconduct at Saint Ann’s School, the Brooklyn private school known for an experimental approach to education, including male teachers having sex with students. (NY Times)

The MTA, out of ideas on how to stop the 7 train from literally falling apart, is asking Chicago if they have any ideas. (NY Post)

The origin story of the city’s best $1 pizza chain. Isn’t the best $1 pizza akin to the sexiest magician? (Viewing NYC)

New York has fond feelings for a mayor’s 2020 presidential run, and it ain’t de Blasio. (NY Times)

The MTA claims subway performance is increasing, while ridership continues to decline. (NY Post)

A Lyft driver was found unconscious in the back of his vehicle early on Saturday morning. He was pronounced dead of an apparent suicide. This marks the ninth taxi suicide in about 16 months. (Patch)

A preview of Astoria’s Socrates Sculpture Park spring 2019 lineup. (We Heart Astoria)

The city nurses’ strike has been postponed while negotiations are ongoing. (amNY)

Is installing facial recognition software at the entrance of a rent-stabilized apartment building going too far? (Gothamist)

The city’s proposed pied-à-terre tax could cut the most expensive apartments’ price in the city in half. Don’t worry, they’ll still be unattainable. (6sqft)

It’s like a Lyft, but helicopters between Manhattan and JFK for $195 a seat. (NY Post)

Marijuana legalization has failed in New Jersey. (NY Times)

Thanks to a $600,000 from real estate developer iStar, Coney Island’s free summer concerts will continue through 2025. (BrooklynVegan)

Longtime Bronx congressperson Jose Serrano announced he will not seeking reelection in 2020 because he has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. (Politico)

Maybe you heard there was an avocado recall. The brutal berries are in Arizona, California, Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. Not New York. (Grub Street)

Jumaane Williams’s old 45th Council District is headed for a special election on May 14 after Jumaane Williams won the special election for the Public Advocate. There are nine hopefuls who plan to run for the seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you ready for a LEGO-but-not-actual-LEGO-themed bar? (Time Out)

The city’s proposed “express” bus route once the L train rehab begins is anything but express. (Curbed)

A breakdown of how the $78 million sewage tanks for the Gowanus Canal actually cost over over $1.2 billion. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said the state is “ready to go forward” on congestion pricing. (amNY)

More controversial than congestion pricing is the city’s plans to replace Rikers Island with four smaller jails in every borough except Staten Island. The first step of the application process is complete. (Patch)

Did you know the fountain of youth is in the Bronx? (Atlas Obscura)

From the “don’t go anywhere ever again” files, theater goers on Broadway claim to have “eaten alive” by bedbugs during a performance of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. The theater denies the claims. (Gothamist)

A fire prevented the Islamic Society of Mid-Manhattan from prayers on Friday and the Reform Jewish congregation of Central Synagogue stepped up to provide space for their prayers. (HuffPost)

20 restaurants you can actually get into. Tell your friends you “know a guy who can get you in” and be a hero. (The Infatuation)

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