The Briefly for September 4, 2018 – The Weirdest Moment in the Gubernatorial Debate, Explained

Sarah Jessica Parker was invoked by Governor Cuomo, a baby Mandrill is born, the Times Square bees have a new home, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Photos from J’Ouvert in Crown Heights.

Save the date! The first public hearing on the rezoning of portions of Governors Island is September 26. Due to a 2003 deal with the federal government, no condos, co-ops, or casinos can be built on the island.

An explanation of the weirdest moment of the gubernatorial debate between Cynthia Nixon and Andrew Cuomo that involved Sarah Jessica Parker and a teahouse in the West Village.

Say hello to the Bronx Zoo’s newest baby Mandrill!

The debate between Lt. Governor Democratic Primary opponents Kathy Hochul and Jumaane Williams is available on MNN’s YouTube channel.

Jem R. Ibrahimov was arrested for allegedly drawing swastikas on a fire house and several ambulances.

The OY/YO sculpture that called Brooklyn Bridge Park and the Williamsburg waterfront home is headed to the Brooklyn Museum from September 19 to June 30 of next year.

“In the afternoon, walking on Fifth Avenue, we were on the edge of a beautiful wind storm, the air full of dust and a sort of panicky terror in all the living things in sight.”

The complete failure of the city’s green cab program provided the exact opportunity Uber needed to thrive.

Franklin Ave gets a permanent Aretha tribute. The MTA Arts & Design and LeRoy McCarthy of Heterodoxx INC (the first person to spray paint the tribute at the same station) worked together for the tribute.

The week ahead in politics, from the Gotham Gazette. The speed camera bill, fist day of school, the first listening session about marijuana legalization, and everything ahead.

The Times Square hot dog bees have a new (and undisclosed) home, according to @NYPDBees.

Scenes from the West Indian Day Parade.

Chuck Schumer endorsed Andrew Cuomo for the upcoming Gubernatorial Democratic primary against Cynthia Nixon.

The Billion Oyster Project is looking to restore, yes, one billion oysters in New York City’s waters by 2035. Oysters can help clean the water, encourage greater biodiversity, and protect against storm damage.

Jasmine Robinson vs. incumbent Diane Savino answer questions from Streetsblog ahead of their 23rd Senate district Democratic primary.

Stop attacking the slot machines at Resorts World Casino in Queens.


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The Briefly for August 31, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, J’Ouvert, Electric Scooters, and More

The weekend’s subway changes (the L train is running), the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar project is a long way from starting, “Jewtropolis” in maps, moving Central Park’s horse carriages away from cars, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about subway changes this weekend and Monday.

The official information on J’Ouvert on Monday. Get a preview of someone of the elaborate preparations.

Gothamist looked at all the New York State Senate campaign websites so you don’t have to.

Meet the rebellious women of NYC in the 1800s.

For a few hours in Uber, the Weather Channel, Snapchat, and others, New York City’s name was changed to Jewtropolis. Whoops.

Dockless electric scooters from Bird have made their debut in the city with the first program taking place in Bed Stuy.

The Mayor’s lack of response to the hit and run that a killed four-year-old in Bushwick compared to everything that he has publicly done in response to the crash the killed a one and four-year-old in Park Slope tells the tale of two Brooklyns.

Some questions for the Governor after his debate against Cynthia Nixon.

The Department of Transportation proposed moving horse carriage pickups in Central Park to five spots within the park to decrease the amount of time they spend alongside cars.

The history of Brooklyn’s Caribbean carnival.

An evening in Washington Heights is documented with a photo essay by The Village Voice.

The plan for the BQX streetcar has been revised. The new plan would connect Astoria on one end to Red Hook and Gowanus on the other end has gotten smaller in scope (stops in Sunset Park were completely removed), will be more expensive ($1.3 billion more) and take longer (won’t be completed until 2029) than the original proposal in 2016.

Today’s NYC Ferry won’t make the trip, but one September day in 1910 and again in August 1911, Rose Pitonof swam the 17 miles from E 23rd St down to Steeplechase Pier in Coney Island.


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The Briefly for August 28, 2018 – The City’s Speed Cameras Return In Time for School

The city worked with Governor Cuomo to sidestep the State Senate to reactivate the school speed cameras in time for the start of school, the BQX trolley’s future is in doubt, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Speed cameras are coming back to the city, but without the State Senate. It’s a Rube Goldberg contraption, so listen to this: Governor Cuomo signed an executive order declaring a public safety emergency and will sign a second executive order that will allow the city to access the traffic data collected from the cameras. The city council is putting together a piece of complex legislation to reinstate the use of the data from the cameras to allow the NYPD to issue tickets to people found speeding in school zones. 133,000 drivers were found to be speeding in the first two weeks after the cameras went dark on July 25.

Eater says NYC pretzels are garbage compared to Philly’s figure 8 pretzels, and this will be the last link to Eater for the rest of the week. They are in an official time out.

Welcome2TheBronx™ has five West African restaurant suggestions in the Bronx.

Without federal funding, Mayor de Blasio’s BQX trolley pet project is DOA. The federal government has only issued $25 million of the $1.4 trillion in funds allocated for new transportation projects in 2018.

The future of Coney Island’s Abe Stark ice rink is in doubt. The city has already signed off on demolishing the building and considering allowing a private developer to rebuild it, but hasn’t announced a decision yet.

Get mad at Brokelyn, because they probably forgot your favorite record store in their 10 best record stores in Brooklyn.

Airbnb is suing the city saying the new disclosure law aimed at short-term rentals is a violation of Airbnb user privacy, calling it systemic, ongoing, bulk surveillance.

Liberty Island was evacuated after a hundred pound propane tank caught fire. The island was evacuated and one person was injured.

Hank’s Saloon will close on Atlantic Ave, but they will be opening a new location inside a new Downtown Brooklyn food hall. If that doesn’t sound like the Hank’s you know and love, you’d be right. “We can never recreate Hank’s as it is now, nor should we” reads the Facebook post. The new venue will also have live music.

10 minutes of 1970s and 1980s NYC commercials.

Sad to report that the cat who functioned as the mascot of Coney Island’s 60th precinct was hit by a car and killed. RIP Marty.

Today starts the city’s regulation on smoking in apartment buildings. As of today, Local Law 147 mandates a smoking or no smoking policy has to be clearly posted in the building.

The 110th Street and Cathedral Parkway B/C station is set to reopen over Labor Day weekend. The 86th and 72nd Street stations are still closed and being serviced by the MTA’s ghost bus.


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