The Briefly for July 3, 2020 – The “Hey Kid, Want To Buy A Baseball Team?” July 4th Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: July 4th subway and bus schedules, the St. James Place dance parties, the NYPD refuses to hand over bodycam footage, where to hang out by the water, & more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 90˚
Rain in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 72˚ High: 87˚

The Briefly turns two years old today!

Here is the MTA’s July 4th weekend beach subway and bus schedule. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

On the night of July 4th, we’ll be able to see a buck moon and a lunar eclipse. Don’t be so impressed with the buck moon part, all that means is that it’s the first full moon in July. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

RIP Free Slurpee Day 2020. (Fanni Frankl for amNewYork Metro)

Want to buy the Mets? You have until July 9 to place your bid. Can we start a Go FundMe? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Eight tips for dining outside right now at NYC restaurants. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

More than 20 streets closed to cars citywide will now be dedicated to outdoor dining starting this weekend and lasting every weekend through Labor Day. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

The High Line will reopen on July 16 with a limited capacity. (NY1)

New York City families will be able to keep their children home this fall and opt for a full remote school schedule regardless of medical need. 25% of students surveyed said they were “very” comfortable returning to school. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Alternate side parking will be suspended from July 5 through the 12. The reason given is the pandemic and trying to keep people from making unnecessary trips. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNew York Metro)

Video: Exploring the origins of the St. James Place in Clinton Hill nightly 7 pm dance party. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New York is no longer on track to contain the coronavirus as infection numbers surge to record new highs across the country. At this rate, herd immunity is possible, but it will take years to set it. CT, MA, RI, and VT are on the list of states on the path to contain the virus. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

One of the big questions coming out of the pandemic is its effect on the city’s real estate and it looks like we’re starting to get hints of what’s to come. Median sales prices in Manhattan fell 17.7% compared to this time last year and the volume of sales dropped 54%. (Stefanos Chen and Sydney Franklin for NY Times)

Astoria’s Artopolis Bakery, Gussy’s Bar, and Monika’s Cafe-Bar are now among the 4% of the city’s restaurants and bars that have permanently closed since March. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Do NYC is attempting to compile a list of permanently closed bars and restaurants. (Do NYC)

By the time Governor Cuomo announced day camps could operate this summer and release safety guidelines for them, it was less than a month to their start date. Hundreds of applications for camps from the city rolled into Albany and there hasn’t been enough time for the Health Department to properly review them before being approved, so the summer started with over 225 camp applications sitting in limbo. (Reuven Blau for The City)

You can see the new exhibition Art on the Grid across the city on 500 bus shelters and 1,700 LinkNYC kiosks. The exhibit explores healing and loss, community and isolation, intimacy and solitude, and inclusivity and exclusivity. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times highlights the importance of the bike protests that have spring up around the city since Memorial Day weekend. (Troy Closson and Sean Piccoli for NY Times)

The Times, feeling optimistic, asks: Could New York finally become a bike city? (Sasha von Oldershausen for NY Times)

Photos: The city’s first day with open beaches. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Whitney Hu, a candidate looking to succeed Carlos Menchaca for City Council for District 38, the district at the center of the Industry City rezoning fight. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

The city will spend $80 million toward the reconstruction of 70 Mulberry St, which was destroyed by fire in January, including many items from the Museum of Chinese in America. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Looking to get married but don’t want to leave your car? Now you can get married in a drive-thru. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: Hundreds of people marched from Bay Ridge to the Barclays Center as a part of the international “Day of Rage” ªin opposition to Israel’s occupation and annexation of Palestine. (Meaghan McGoldrick, photos by Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A one-minute explanation of why some animals thrive in NYC and some flounder. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A first look at a proposed mixed-use development on the Astoria/Long Island City that will take up five blocks with twelve buildings that are being called “Innovation QNS,” which is an awful name. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

During the construction of a seawall to protect a train yard in Inwood from another Hurricane Sandy, the MTA unearthed a patrol torpedo boat from the Harlem River that was once commanded by John F. Kennedy. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

How many times have you ridden a subway to the end of a line? Exploring the end of the 2 line. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The problem with asking your employees for their feedback is that they know that you heard it. When WNYC’s newsroom was asked who should lead their daily news coverage them after the harassment and discrimination that plagued the newsroom was brought to light, the answer was clear: a person of color who understood New York, with experience in public radio. Their new boss? A white woman from California with no public radio experience. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

The state is rolling back some of its bail reforms, which took hold six months ago. More charges will be eligible for bail and more categories will be eligible for bail, which will result in more people being sent to jail, which has become an extremely dangerous place to be during the pandemic. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A Blue Lives Matter rally in the Bronx, as you might expect, quickly devolved into the participants screaming obscenities and threatening protesters. Yes, there is video. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says the City Council bowed to “mob rule” when it came to the city’s budget. Mayor de Blasio, never one to not put his foot in his mouth, defended Shea’s comments. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The NYPD has refused to hand over 1,137 requests for body camera footage, according to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, which has made investigating complaints “untenable.” It’s this kind of bullshit response for the NYPD, who refuses to take accountability for their actions, that brought us to this moment, where the public’s trust in them has eroded and created the NYPD-led violence during the George Floyd protests. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Making the case for a subway stop in Harlem to be named after Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, who collected one of the world’s largest libraries of African American books, prints, and artifacts and whose collection became the basis for the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library’s Division of Negro Literature, History, and Prints. (Wilfredo Florentino for Streetsblog)

17 outdoor bars and restaurants to hang out at by the water. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 8, 2019 – The “Boomer Boogeyman is to Blame” Edition

The NYPD runs a cyclist oft the road, Melinda Katz’ lead narrows to 16 votes, a look back on Seinfeld’s pilot, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway disruptions seem minimal. (Subway Weekender)

“Admittedly it was against the law, but we had police consent.” This is the story of a band of vigilantes who destroyed a grove of trees in Forest Hills as the police watched in an attempt to harass the gay community a few days before the Stonewall Riots. (NY Times)

This Wednesday your good friends at The Briefly and the skint bring you ‘When Harry Met Sally’-themed Trivia at Parklife. (Brooklyn Based)

The “boomer backlash,” self-identified progressives born between 1946 and 1964, is hampering city progress across the country using tactics normally associated with the alt-right to shout down and shut out changes to their neighborhoods. These voices don’t represent the will of the majority, but they’re the loudest and most mobilized in the room with the most people in their Facebook groups. This is how so many people in Park Slope seem opposed to housing for the homeless, 14th Street doesn’t prioritize buses while the L train has minimal service or why so many needless deaths occur on the city’s streets because some residents prioritize the city providing public parking for private vehicles instead of the safety of cyclists. This, from the generation that gave us the 2008 housing bubble, the war in Iraq, and who handed out participation trophies. (Huff Post)

Pity your Jersey friends, for many reasons. Especially who must take N.J. Transit. Last week alone, more than 60 trains were canceled. (NY Times)

15 awesome Astoria happy hours. (We Heart Astoria)

A good news story for your Monday. Three officers sent to arrest a woman who was allegedly stealing groceries at the Union Square Whole Foods paid for the items instead. (Patch)

Victor Ang succumbed to injuries sustained after he was hit by a car while biking in April and has become the city’s 15th biker who was hit by a car and killed in 2019. (Gothamist)

The NYPD intentionally rammed a cyclist on a Citi Bike who ran two red lights. The NYPD’s crackdown on drivers creating unsafe situations for cyclists has yet to begin. (Streetsblog)

How to find a rent-stabilized apartment. (Curbed)

How was your weekend? Oh, you know, I watched a video of a man carrying a live rat in his mouth while riding the subway. (Patch)

Turns out the best place to watch the July 4th fireworks was illegally riding between subway cars on the Manhattan Bridge. (Gothamist)

Congrats to you, Brooklyn! There were no reported firework-related injuries during July 4, despite me watching a group of bewildered men accidentally shoot off a dozen of rockets at a line of parked cars and garbage piles. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The ubiquity of camera phones can make you take a candid photo of a street vendor for granted but a look through the photos taken by a tourist in NYC in 1970 can shift your entire perspective, especially a photo from the Empire State Building looking South which is without Battery Park City or the World Trade Center. (Ephemeral New York)

A cross-sectional look at some of the city’s landmarks. (Viewing NYC)

The spread of measles has been slowing, calling back to the city’s history of containing contagious diseases, even if it wasn’t always pleasant. (6sqft)

An exhaustive look back at the one episode of Seinfeld you probably haven’t watched a thousand times: the pilot. (Gothamist)

12 sites that explore the immigrant experience in NYC. (Curbed)

Here they are, the Dominique Ansel city-themed pastries that look like toy versions of other food. If you’re dying for a pavlova shaped like an everything bagel, this is your opportunity. (Gothamist)

There weren’t too many restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health (either it was the short holiday week or the city’s eateries are getting cleaner), but we still have a new entry into the triple-digit point club. (Patch)

The city declared a climate emergency. What’s next? (NY Times)

Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s lead in the Democratic primary is down to 16 votes. This week the manual recount begins. (Politico)

An unidentified male body was found dead inside a food truck on Liberty Ave in Jamaica. (QNS)

Andrej Tadeusz Kosciuszko, for whom the city bridge and pool are named after, is getting a memorial in his hometown in Belarus. Kosciuszko traveled to the United States from Poland after hearing of the Revolutionary War and by the end of the war became a brigadier general. (NY Times)

U.S. Women’s National Team is getting a ticker tape parade on Wednesday morning from Battery Park to City Hall, only the fifth since the year 2000. (amNY)

10 great rooftop bars. (NY Times)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 2, 2019 – The “One of the Worst Run Big Cities in America!” Edition

The CBD ban is kind-of in effect, the 14th St busway lawsuit gets pushback, the best lunch spots in Midtown East, the Seamless controversy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Start putting your July 4th travel plans together, even if you’re not planning on leaving the city, because subways, streets, buses, and ferries will all be affected by holiday changes. (Curbed)

Congrats to presidential candidate and sometimes-in-NYC mayor Bill de Blasio. New York City is one of the worst run big cities in America! (Patch)

After the Shalimar Diner closed in November, a Facebook group called “Save the Shalimar Diner” wanted to… you know, save the Shalimar Diner. Cue 1986 Met Lenny Dykstra, who is (kind of) saving it by moving the whole thing to Long Island. (Untapped Cities)

Construction debris fell from the 12th story of a nearby apartment building still being finished through the roof of Mission Delores, the popular Park Slope bar, on Sunday, seriously injuring a woman who was in the bar. Mission Delores is closed until further notice and the woman who was struck is breathing with the assistance of a tube at Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. (Eater)

8 new outdoor art installations for July. (Untapped Cities)

Dante de Blasio wrote an op-ed in today’s USA Today about “the talk” his father had with him about dealing with the police that was mentioned in last week’s presidential primary debate. The head of the Police Benevolent Associaton called the mayor’s remarks “shameful.” (USA Today)

Eater wanted to know if L&B Spumoni Garden is still good. Turns out it is! (Eater)

The city is nearly doubling its monetary support for the LGBT community with funding for Trans Equity Programs, LGBT community services, and LGBT inclusive curriculums in public schools. (6sqft)

Here’s what you need to know about the Grub Hub/Seamless website buying controversy that erupted last week. Grub Hub has been finding new and creative ways to rip off local restaurants, including registering fake websites in their names and tricking customers. (Grub Street)

Playing ping-pong on the subway. Fun idea or public nuisance? (Gothamist)

The president doesn’t seem to know Letitia James’s name, but he certainly knows he thinks she’s being used by Governor Cuomo against him. (Patch)

The count of people who’ve died in car crashes while riding bicycles is up to 15 in 2019. 29-year-old Devra Freelander was hit and killed by a 70-year-old cement truck driver in Bushwick. (Streetsblog)

The number of dead bicyclists on city streets was 10 for all of 2018, the mayor says Vision Zero, which strives to “use every tool at its disposal to improve the safety of our streets,” will still be viewed as a success this year. (Gothamist)

The opposition to the 14th Street busway has some opposition of its own. An advocacy group supporting the busway slammed the lawsuit that blocked the busway from taking effect on July 1 as classist, citing the average rider of the M14 has an income of $28,455/year and are people of color. (amNY)

Reaching-Out in Bensonhurst is a food pantry that has provided food and social service referrals to people in need for 30 years but due to a shortage of funds has had to turn away hungry families. The shortage is due to stagnant funding. They currently serve 9,800 families and are always open to donations. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you have $13 million, you can own something almost no one in NYC has: your own set of private islands. (NY Times)

The city’s ban on CBD was promised at the beginning of the year for July 1. Now that it’s July, the Department of Health claims that it is cracking down, but they won’t issues fines until October 1. (amNY)

If you’re looking for the city’s biggest asshole, you wouldn’t be wrong to start looking at whoever decided to create this $250 hot dog. (Gothamist)

What does Midtown need? How about an 800-foot tall tower right on top of Macy’s? (NY Times)

The mayor will honor the late Det. Luis Alvarez, who recently died at 53 due to 9/11-related cancer, with a key to the city. (amNY)

A former high school student was awarded nearly $60 million in damages on Monday after a Manhattan jury found the city’s Department of Education and his former teacher liable for an accident that left much of his body scarred from third-degree burns. (NY Times)

A non-NIMBY argument against City Councilmember Brad Lander’s “YIMBY Junk.” (Red Hook Star-Revue)

The days of speeding without consequence in the city is coming to an end. The city is installing 2,000 speed cameras within a quarter mile of schools, which are practically everywhere. Anyone going 10 mph over the posted speed limit will get a $50 ticket. Critics say that turning the entire city into a speed trap won’t save lives, but anyone who gets a $50 ticket in the mail will start driving differently. (NY Times)

Where to get lunch in Midtown East. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.