The Briefly for May 5, 2019 – The “Pole Dancing Rats Are So Last Week” Edition

The future of Sunnyside Yards, dollar oysters, the prettiest block in the city, Jeff Bezos buys an apartment, the appeal of a rear-facing apartment and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Is this a video of cops fighting each other in Harlem, or is it a video of people dressed as cops fighting each other in Harlem? That stupid question is what the NYPD would like you to ask. (Gothamist)

Rumors keep saying that New York City Transit president Andy Byford is on his way out the door. Someone tell Andy, because he reportedly just signed a new lease. (Gothamist)

Let’s not forget the cold history between the governor and Byford, who spend the first few months of the year never speaking to one another directly. (Second Ave Sagas)

Maybe Andy should leave. Governor Cuomo is cutting over three billion from the MTA budget over the next three years. (Daily News)

Pole dancing rats on the subway are so last week. This week it’s all about a loose bat on the F Train. (Gothamist)

The views ain’t great, the light is limited, but it’s hard to fight the appeal of a rear-facing apartment. (StreetEasy)

The Yemeni bodega owners’ protest of the New York Post has cost the newspaper an estimated $270,000 since the protest started two months ago. (The Indypendent)

Get ready wave hello to Rikers Island’s latest prisoner: Paul Manafort. (Patch)

The Death By Audio Arcade’s new home at Wonderville is open on the border of Bushwick and Bed-Stuy. Take a look at photos of the inside. (Gothamist)

Bumble is opening a cafe and wine in Soho this fall. According to Bumble, it’ll also be a place to hold business meetings and meet friends, so if you see a non-single friend in there, don’t freak out. (6sqft)

Apparently, NYC is a great place for a staycation. That’s a great suggestion because people keep dying on Mount Everest. (Patch)

Linda Fairstein, one of the lead prosecutors of the Central Park Five case, resigned her position at Vassar after a student petition with over 10,000 signatures was asking for her full removal. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’ve been asking yourself “electric mopeds, smart cars, bikes, what’s next?” San Francisco is about to receive rentable pogo sticks. (Curbed)

Rent is high, but at least we’re not San Francisco. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re pool hunting this summer, don’t forget to check out Roosevelt Island’s Manhattan Park Pool Club. (Curbed)

Bluestockings in the Lower East Side gets the Atlas Obscura treatment. (Atlas Obscura)

Pastis has reopened after a five-year hiatus. (NY Times)

He couldn’t get a three billion dollar tax break, but Jeff Bezos willing to pay $80 million for a 17,000 square foot apartment in 212 Fifth Ave. (The Real Deal)

10 important lighthouses in the city. Honestly, can you think of one lighthouse in the city? You’re probably surprised there’s enough for a list. (6sqft)

A brief history of SummerStage in Central Park. (Gothamist)

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams was arrested during a tenants-rights protest in Albany. (Patch)

Eight people have been arrested as part of the city’s crackdown of fake parking placards. Maybe next they’ll address abuse of legitimate placards. (amNY)

Declawing cats is now illegal in the state of New York. (NY Times)

The whole Governors Ball situation just keeps getting worse. The latest is accusations that the guards used excessive force. (BrooklynVegan)

Leonard Swanson, an NYPD officer, was suspended after allegedly choking his girlfriend on Monday night. (Gothamist)

Station Square: “The Prettiest Block in New York” (NY Mag)

2019 could be the busiest year for the city’s skyline. 16 towers are being planned or are currently under construction that top out at over 1,000 feet. To give perspective, there are currently only nine towers in the city at that height. (NY Times)

Could the Sunnyside Yards project become the next Hudson Yards? With a possible 24,000 new apartments built over the railroad yard decks, is a second Hudson Yards a reasonable idea for a borough that already has Long Island City’s luxury housing and could the project still happen without the inclusion of luxury housing? (The Indypendent)

Dollar oyster deals in the city, mapped. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 14, 2019 – The “Four Billion Dollar Leaky Roof” Edition

Bill de Blasio tries to hold a rally, another yeshiva is closed, more speed cameras are coming to the city, a wallaby has a new home, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Video: How much do you love your partner? Enough to get married on the Q train? (ABC 7 NY)

It seems like a bad idea to stop paying your mortgage for five years, but that’s what legendarily stubborn Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer did with her four-story Upper West Side townhouse in protest of a tax issue. (The City)

This is your weekly warning that if you have allergies, never leave the house. This week will bring blooming flowers and misery for you while the tree and grass pollen count remains very high or high through Monday. (Patch)

The Oculus is leaking. After spending $4 billion on the building, $32 million on the skylight, and $30,000 on filling leaks with sealant, you’d think the problem would be under control. The Port Authority will replace the skylight’s rubber seal this summer. (6sqft)

The new Essex Market opened its doors, across the street from the original location. (Eater)

10 fun facts about the new Essex Market. You can’t have an opening without some fun facts! (Untapped Cities)

Video: Watch 24 hours of city transit in one minute. (Will Geary)

Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer accused of choking Eric Garner to death, faces a possible firing during his NYPD internal trial. Pantaleo’s lawyer says he did not use a chokehold and did not have his arm around Eric Garner’s throat when Garner was saying he could not breathe. The trial will last two weeks. (Patch)

With the new price of a MetroCard and no bonuses, does a value or a timed card make more sense? More often than not, even if you commute to work 5x a week, the pay per ride card is a cheaper option. (Gothamist)

Award-winning cocktails and vegan BBQ in the East Village. (Bedford + Bowery)

Mayor de Blasio attempted to create a vision of a man who was running for president by mounting a climate change rally outside of Trump Tower only to be heckled by people with “Trump 2020” and “Worst Mayor Ever” signs. The man no one wants to see run for president said that he’ll make his decision this week about if he wants to spend the next year of his life on a losing endeavor instead of his job as mayor. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio was attempting to tout the city’s New Green Deal’s impact on the Trump Organization, which will cost the company millions of dollars in fines if they don’t renovate their buildings to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. (Splinter)

Subway maps used to be pretty cool, as evidence of this map from 1958. (Viewing NYC)

It appears that marijuana legalization in New York is on life support. (NY Times)

63% of city voters changing the SHSAT to boost diversity, with 57% willing to scrap the test altogether. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“What the hell does the ‘night mayor’ even do?” No one’s really sure, but at the very least the night mayor’s office has a Facebook and Instagram account now. (BrooklynVegan)

This year a New York Times piece by an Aperol Spritz denier kicked up a city-wide argument in defense of the summer-y drink. There will be a “Rally for Aperol” on Friday, which sounds less like a rally and more like a sponsored event at a bar. (Time Out)

Manhattanhenge approcheth. (I Love the Upper West Side)

An update on Charter Communications, the company trying to buy Time Warner Cable and was subsequently told to leave New York because of poor service, broken promises, and defrauding the state. They’re being allowed to stay after promising they won’t break any more promises. (Boing Boing)

Howie, the wallaby that ended up in the case of the Animal Care Centers of NYC, will find a new home in the Bronx Zoo. (Patch)

The governor signed a bill into law that will increase the number of speed cameras in school zones from 140 to 750 this summer, which makes last year’s fight over cameras feel like an extremely distant memory. The cameras will operate from 6am to 10pm. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here are the eight hopefuls in the 45th Council District in Flatbush’s special election, vying for Jumaane William’s former seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Is this the subway car of the future? Forget high tech, just give us a place to stand where our crotch isn’t directly in someone’s face while they eat their carton of egg salad. (Cheddar)

If you’re someone who collected limited edition MetroCards, 9/11 Emergency Responder MetroCard will soon be available at 10 stations. If you’d like to avoid a daily reminder of the city’s terrorist disaster, there are 10 stations you should not buy your MetroCard at. (Gothamist)

A yeshiva in Queens was closed as the city’s cases of the measles is nearly at 500 people. Eight of the nine schools and daycare centers previously closed have reopened under Department of Health supervision. (amNY)

Video: A tour from a real New York insider. Richard Splett’s New York Splett of Mind for Splettnet.net. Richard Splett was recently Richard Splett on HBO’s Veep. (Splettnet)

The five best chocolate chip cookies in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for March 26, 2019 – The “Hey Chicago, Do You Have Any Ideas?” Edition

Bed bugs on Broadway, the MTA asks Chicago for help, subway ridership continues to decline, the history of the best $1 pizza, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Governors Island is getting a new arts center in an old munitions warehouse. If you’ve been to the island before, it’s the building near the Manhattan ferry landing with public bathrooms. (Curbed)

An investigation has found credible allegations of sexual misconduct at Saint Ann’s School, the Brooklyn private school known for an experimental approach to education, including male teachers having sex with students. (NY Times)

The MTA, out of ideas on how to stop the 7 train from literally falling apart, is asking Chicago if they have any ideas. (NY Post)

The origin story of the city’s best $1 pizza chain. Isn’t the best $1 pizza akin to the sexiest magician? (Viewing NYC)

New York has fond feelings for a mayor’s 2020 presidential run, and it ain’t de Blasio. (NY Times)

The MTA claims subway performance is increasing, while ridership continues to decline. (NY Post)

A Lyft driver was found unconscious in the back of his vehicle early on Saturday morning. He was pronounced dead of an apparent suicide. This marks the ninth taxi suicide in about 16 months. (Patch)

A preview of Astoria’s Socrates Sculpture Park spring 2019 lineup. (We Heart Astoria)

The city nurses’ strike has been postponed while negotiations are ongoing. (amNY)

Is installing facial recognition software at the entrance of a rent-stabilized apartment building going too far? (Gothamist)

The city’s proposed pied-à-terre tax could cut the most expensive apartments’ price in the city in half. Don’t worry, they’ll still be unattainable. (6sqft)

It’s like a Lyft, but helicopters between Manhattan and JFK for $195 a seat. (NY Post)

Marijuana legalization has failed in New Jersey. (NY Times)

Thanks to a $600,000 from real estate developer iStar, Coney Island’s free summer concerts will continue through 2025. (BrooklynVegan)

Longtime Bronx congressperson Jose Serrano announced he will not seeking reelection in 2020 because he has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. (Politico)

Maybe you heard there was an avocado recall. The brutal berries are in Arizona, California, Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. Not New York. (Grub Street)

Jumaane Williams’s old 45th Council District is headed for a special election on May 14 after Jumaane Williams won the special election for the Public Advocate. There are nine hopefuls who plan to run for the seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you ready for a LEGO-but-not-actual-LEGO-themed bar? (Time Out)

The city’s proposed “express” bus route once the L train rehab begins is anything but express. (Curbed)

A breakdown of how the $78 million sewage tanks for the Gowanus Canal actually cost over over $1.2 billion. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said the state is “ready to go forward” on congestion pricing. (amNY)

More controversial than congestion pricing is the city’s plans to replace Rikers Island with four smaller jails in every borough except Staten Island. The first step of the application process is complete. (Patch)

Did you know the fountain of youth is in the Bronx? (Atlas Obscura)

From the “don’t go anywhere ever again” files, theater goers on Broadway claim to have “eaten alive” by bedbugs during a performance of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. The theater denies the claims. (Gothamist)

A fire prevented the Islamic Society of Mid-Manhattan from prayers on Friday and the Reform Jewish congregation of Central Synagogue stepped up to provide space for their prayers. (HuffPost)

20 restaurants you can actually get into. Tell your friends you “know a guy who can get you in” and be a hero. (The Infatuation)

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