The Briefly for October 15, 2019 – The “Cuomo Enters the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio Feud” Edition

National Grid is told to hook-up new customers, a death at the Brooklyn Museum, Letitia James wins another fight against the Trump Administration, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Common Cause New York is suing the state because it says New York’s law that allows the removal of voters from the list of “active” voters used at voting sites, which it says is a violation of the National Voter Registration Act. The federal court case begins today. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson’s “master plan” a) needs a better name and b) will be voted on by the City Council, according to Corey Johnson. (Gotham Gazette)

If you’re here for the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio feud in 2019 over a potential statue of an Italian-American saint, here it is. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

Here’s a reminder of Corey’s Master Plan. (Curbed)

1,136 words from the Times, all to say riding the 14th St bus is good after the street was shut down to traffic. (NY Times)

Is it time to kill NYPL late fees? (Gothamist)

It’s been two weeks since NYPD officer Brian Mulkeen and Antonio Williams were killed by the NYPD and there are still large gaps of information missing about the incident. (Gothamist)

An NYCHA development is selling its air rights for $25 million, but over the next five years, it needs about $159 million in repairs. Can they sell their air rights seven times? (Curbed)

Real estate porn: A West Village townhouse built in 1822 with a basement library and prohibition-era secret tunnel that leads to a speakeasy down the street. (Viewing NYC)

Uber wants to expand its bike-share program in Staten Island, but also wants to severely limit its users’ ability to sue the company. Citi Bike, which is operated by Lyft, does not use forced arbitration, but it does force mediation. (Politico)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

A man died at the Brooklyn Museum in a “freak accident” that involved him trying to slide down a banister and falling backward three stories to the ground on Saturday night. (Gothamist)

Schneps Media bought amNewYork and they’ve been dark ever since with the number of newsroom layoffs rumored to be between seven and 16. (NY Times)

Patch was less gentle, calling the newsroom “gutted.” (Patch)

The five men convicted of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman were sentenced on Friday. Martinez Estrella was sentenced to life without parole and the other four co-defendants received 25 to life. (Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James won another court battle against the President Trump administration with a federal judge blocking the “public charge” rule on Friday. (Politico)

Brooklyn Supreme Court Justice Sylvia Ashe was arrested on Friday for obstruction of justice which stems from an alleged scheme to cover up an embezzlement scandal involving MCU’s former CEO. Ashe is a former chair of the board of MCU’s directors. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York is the first state in the nation to require all ingredients to be listed on tampons, pads, menstrual cups, and period underwear. (Gothamist)

Before The Rolling Loud festival, the NYPD, the figurative and literal cops, asked organizers to remove 22Gz, Casanova, Pop Smoke, Sheff G, and Don Q from the lineup. (NY Times)

Bogdan Darmetko is the 25th cyclist killed in 2019 by a driver on the streets of the city. (Streetsblog)

Four men were killed in a shooting at an illegal social club in Crown Heights over the weekend. The police chief of patrol, Rodney Harrison, gave a quote that blamed the community for the illegal clubs’ continued operation and the deaths. (NY Times)

The governor ordered National Grid to stop playing games a provide gas to more than 1,100 new customers. The governor, never to get a job 100% done, and his demands only apply to the backlog of customers and don’t apply to new ones. (Brooklyn Paper)

Broad City’s Abbi & Ilana are back… to tell us all about the ballot questions on this fall’s elections. (Gotham Gazette)

15 cozy restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “Poison Ivy is Growing All Over the City” Edition

Photos and highlights from the USWNT’s ticker-tape parade, Citi Bike is failing NYers of color and the poor, WORD’s summer reading list, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Here’s an overview of where the Queens DA race is at the moment. (amNY)

The governor has a bill on his desk that can end the Cabán/Katz election lawsuit. Why hasn’t he signed it? (NY Times)

The state passed rent reform, but that’s no reason to let your guard down. Here are four new ways that landlords will try to raise your rent. (Gothamist)

The city started to make good on a promise made 15 years ago to bring a park to Downtown Brooklyn. The first portion of Willoughby Square Park is open to the public on the corner of Gold and Duffield. (Curbed)

Can you identify poison ivy? No? Here’s a primer, since apparently, it grows all over the city. (Gothamist)

The oldest 13 restaurants in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Adda, Atomix, and Kopitiam are now on Eater’s best new restaurants in America list. (Eater)

Photos from the World Cup USWNT Parade. (amNY)

Team captain Megan Rapinoe’s speech was full of hope and ended with a truism: “New York City, you’re the motherfucking best!” (Huff Post)

The glorious signs at the parade. (Huff Post)

If you’ve still got soccer fever, here’s a list of new or soon-to-be-built soccer fields across the city. (Localize Labs)

A history of ticker-tape parades. (6sqft)

RIP Michael Seidenberg, owner of Brazenhead Books, an Upper West Side speakeasy bookstore that held late-night salons. (Untapped Cities)

Congrats are in store to the first Trailblazers Awards from the Brooklyn Cannabiz Collective, honoring people of color who are pioneers in the cannabis industry. (Brooklyn Paper)

What’s on your summer reading list? Here’s an offering from WORD Bookstore. (Brooklyn Based)

The city announced a decrease in the size of the community jails planned as a replacement for Rikers Island. (amNY)

Activists disrupted the meetings to shout down Deputy Director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice Dana Kaplan’s testimony. (Patch)

MAMACHA café was known for it’s CBD infused drinks, snacks, and soft-serve ice cream. Unsurprisingly, it closed the same day the city’s CBD-food and drink ban was put into place. (Bedford + Bowery)

A new contract agreement between pre-K teachers and the city will bring them one step closer to pay parity with the rest of the city’s teachers, bumping up the salaries of some Community Based Organization (CBO) teachers by $20,000. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Dave Chappelle is Dave Chappelle, even when he’s on Broadway. Of course, he’s gonna stir up some controversy. (BrooklynVegan)

A new report shows that Citi Bike is failing to include New Yorkers of color and the poor. The median household income of people who lives close to a Citi Bike dock is $90,400, while the median household income of someone is $54,700. The report calls for Citi Bike to expand into 11 specific neighborhoods with “high social vulnerability.” (Curbed)

Camp Junior, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is open this summer after a two-year renovation. The camp is open for 9-to-13-year-olds from neighborhoods in the Bronx with a risk of gang activity. (Patch)

Dean & Deluca owes small businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars for providing the chain with cookies, bread, pastries, and etc and will be closing stores in an attempt to stay in business. (NY Times)

This year’s Summer Streets dates have been announced. Get ready to take over Park Ave on three Sundays in August. (Viewing NYC)

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s artist-in-residence program has selected this year’s artists. E, Jane, Elliot Reed, and Naudline Pierre. The group show from the previous cohort is up at MoMA PS1, which will also host next year’s edition. (NY Times)

How to spend a day in the Rockaways. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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