The Briefly for November 14, 2019 – The “Problem Goes Deeper Than Policing Churros” Edition

Virginity tests, the NYPD’s illegal child fingerprint database was destroyed, the food at Wegmans gets reviewed, OMNY expands, pie shops, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The punishment for killing a woman with a car? $750 and a suspended license. (Streetsblog)

“I am calling on the governor to immediately remove these additional officers from the MTA and put that money into actually improving the system. The governor cannot expect the public to pay the fare when the State is refusing to hold up its own financial responsibility.” – City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn (Streetsblog)

Will the 500 new police officers on buses and in subway stations prevent 33 million evaded fares a year for ten years? That figure, of course, doesn’t include any lawsuits that spawn from arrests made by those officers. That’s the monetary argument, but if the surge of officers is about fare evasion and protecting MTA workers, why are the headlines about churro ladies and teenagers selling candy? It’s about the kind of city we want to be. (Second Ave Sagas)

A look at the new Tompkins Square Playground’s equipment for kids with special needs. (EV Grieve)

The City Council voted to give themselves a $36,000 raise, but haven’t been nearly as generous with their staff, who make $47,784 annually on average. There has been conversations about unionization to improve salaries. (Politico)

A vegetarian restaurant that only serves one item, but is it any good? Yes is the answer. (Gothamist)

The city owns most of the land in the amusement area of Coney Island, but Central Amusement International (owners of Luna Park) operates the lease on the boardwalk shops. In addition to rent, they take 10% of their overall sales. In recent years they’ve been favoring their own games, shops, and food options over mom and pop shops. This is a private business deciding on the future of businesses who are on land owned by the city. Lola Star, the woman behind the boardwalk shop and roller discos across Brooklyn is stepping up and resurrecting the advocacy group Save Coney Island. (Coney Island Blog)

Every rental building in Manhattan ranked by price. (StreetEasy)

The Charging Bull isn’t moving… yet. Despite the mayor talking big in public about how it has to be moved due to Bowling Green being an unsafe place for that high number of visitors it receives, a location to move it to was never decided on. For now, the bull remains. (Gothamist)

The Coalition for Affordable Homes is introducing a proposal for a Small Home Anti-Speculation Tax that would impose a 15-20% tax on property transferred to a new owner within two years of ownership. While they may not prevent flipping houses, it would reinvest in affordable housing in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

After 24,200 calls to 911 since June using a burner cellphone, Yogit Persaud was arrested. Each time she would call, the police or FDNY or both would have to respond to the claim, regardless if they knew it was from her and it was a false report. Persaud purports the NYPD has conspired against her. She was arrested for making a false emergency report, obstructing governmental administration, and aggravated harassment. (Gothamist)

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, leader of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and current investigator of sexual abuse the Buffalo diocese, sexually assaulted an 11-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New Jersey in the 70s, according to a new lawsuit. (NY Times)

Billionaire Barry Diller’s public park island off Pier 55 has a new name and it’s “Little Island.” A modest name considering the price tag ballooned from $35 million to $250 million. (Gothamist)

Junior’s Law, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is a bill that will reimburse small businesses owners the cost of a panic button, which could have saved the teenager’s life. The bill has 31 supporters in the City Council. (amNewYork)

Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce wants you to remember that there are still stores that are open left on Bleecker Street to shop at and has declared November 23 “Shop Bleecker Day,” where participating shops will provide deals and discounts. (amNewYork)

Virginity tests are still a thing in the year 2019. A bill was introduced to ban them in New York. This is, of course, coming into headlines now because T.I. admitted in an interview that he forces his 18-year-old daughter to undergo hymen checks annually, which is awful. (Gothamist)

While Staten Island is still a part of New York City (you can read about that in yesterday’s edition of The Briefly), it has a new dockless bike program. Beryl will operate 1,000 bikes across the island starting in the spring. (Streetsblog)

Take a look inside (renderings of) Disney’s upcoming Hudson Square HQ. (amNewYork)

The governor gave National Grid two weeks to hook up new customers of he will revoke their franchise to supply gas to New York City. (Gothamist)

The NYPD’s illegal database of children’s fingerprints was confirmed to be destroyed after a years-long investigation into it by the Legal Aid Society. (Patch)

“Wegmans is not good enough to be your destination food court.” Eater reviews the food at Wegmans. (Eater)

OMNY is hitting more subway stations next month, including Penn Station. (6sqft)

A guide to OMNY. (Curbed)

The city fines landlords for lead, but rarely ever collects. Even the highest estimates put the figure at 10%. (Gothamist)

The new age for tobacco or e-cigarette purchases is now 21 years old. (amNewYork)

Seven ways to fix your overheated apartment. Yes, “open the windows” is number one. (StreetEasy)

14 spectacular pie shops. (Eater)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for October 15, 2019 – The “Cuomo Enters the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio Feud” Edition

National Grid is told to hook-up new customers, a death at the Brooklyn Museum, Letitia James wins another fight against the Trump Administration, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Common Cause New York is suing the state because it says New York’s law that allows the removal of voters from the list of “active” voters used at voting sites, which it says is a violation of the National Voter Registration Act. The federal court case begins today. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson’s “master plan” a) needs a better name and b) will be voted on by the City Council, according to Corey Johnson. (Gotham Gazette)

If you’re here for the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio feud in 2019 over a potential statue of an Italian-American saint, here it is. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

Here’s a reminder of Corey’s Master Plan. (Curbed)

1,136 words from the Times, all to say riding the 14th St bus is good after the street was shut down to traffic. (NY Times)

Is it time to kill NYPL late fees? (Gothamist)

It’s been two weeks since NYPD officer Brian Mulkeen and Antonio Williams were killed by the NYPD and there are still large gaps of information missing about the incident. (Gothamist)

An NYCHA development is selling its air rights for $25 million, but over the next five years, it needs about $159 million in repairs. Can they sell their air rights seven times? (Curbed)

Real estate porn: A West Village townhouse built in 1822 with a basement library and prohibition-era secret tunnel that leads to a speakeasy down the street. (Viewing NYC)

Uber wants to expand its bike-share program in Staten Island, but also wants to severely limit its users’ ability to sue the company. Citi Bike, which is operated by Lyft, does not use forced arbitration, but it does force mediation. (Politico)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

A man died at the Brooklyn Museum in a “freak accident” that involved him trying to slide down a banister and falling backward three stories to the ground on Saturday night. (Gothamist)

Schneps Media bought amNewYork and they’ve been dark ever since with the number of newsroom layoffs rumored to be between seven and 16. (NY Times)

Patch was less gentle, calling the newsroom “gutted.” (Patch)

The five men convicted of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman were sentenced on Friday. Martinez Estrella was sentenced to life without parole and the other four co-defendants received 25 to life. (Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James won another court battle against the President Trump administration with a federal judge blocking the “public charge” rule on Friday. (Politico)

Brooklyn Supreme Court Justice Sylvia Ashe was arrested on Friday for obstruction of justice which stems from an alleged scheme to cover up an embezzlement scandal involving MCU’s former CEO. Ashe is a former chair of the board of MCU’s directors. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York is the first state in the nation to require all ingredients to be listed on tampons, pads, menstrual cups, and period underwear. (Gothamist)

Before The Rolling Loud festival, the NYPD, the figurative and literal cops, asked organizers to remove 22Gz, Casanova, Pop Smoke, Sheff G, and Don Q from the lineup. (NY Times)

Bogdan Darmetko is the 25th cyclist killed in 2019 by a driver on the streets of the city. (Streetsblog)

Four men were killed in a shooting at an illegal social club in Crown Heights over the weekend. The police chief of patrol, Rodney Harrison, gave a quote that blamed the community for the illegal clubs’ continued operation and the deaths. (NY Times)

The governor ordered National Grid to stop playing games a provide gas to more than 1,100 new customers. The governor, never to get a job 100% done, and his demands only apply to the backlog of customers and don’t apply to new ones. (Brooklyn Paper)

Broad City’s Abbi & Ilana are back… to tell us all about the ballot questions on this fall’s elections. (Gotham Gazette)

15 cozy restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “Poison Ivy is Growing All Over the City” Edition

Photos and highlights from the USWNT’s ticker-tape parade, Citi Bike is failing NYers of color and the poor, WORD’s summer reading list, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Here’s an overview of where the Queens DA race is at the moment. (amNY)

The governor has a bill on his desk that can end the Cabán/Katz election lawsuit. Why hasn’t he signed it? (NY Times)

The state passed rent reform, but that’s no reason to let your guard down. Here are four new ways that landlords will try to raise your rent. (Gothamist)

The city started to make good on a promise made 15 years ago to bring a park to Downtown Brooklyn. The first portion of Willoughby Square Park is open to the public on the corner of Gold and Duffield. (Curbed)

Can you identify poison ivy? No? Here’s a primer, since apparently, it grows all over the city. (Gothamist)

The oldest 13 restaurants in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Adda, Atomix, and Kopitiam are now on Eater’s best new restaurants in America list. (Eater)

Photos from the World Cup USWNT Parade. (amNY)

Team captain Megan Rapinoe’s speech was full of hope and ended with a truism: “New York City, you’re the motherfucking best!” (Huff Post)

The glorious signs at the parade. (Huff Post)

If you’ve still got soccer fever, here’s a list of new or soon-to-be-built soccer fields across the city. (Localize Labs)

A history of ticker-tape parades. (6sqft)

RIP Michael Seidenberg, owner of Brazenhead Books, an Upper West Side speakeasy bookstore that held late-night salons. (Untapped Cities)

Congrats are in store to the first Trailblazers Awards from the Brooklyn Cannabiz Collective, honoring people of color who are pioneers in the cannabis industry. (Brooklyn Paper)

What’s on your summer reading list? Here’s an offering from WORD Bookstore. (Brooklyn Based)

The city announced a decrease in the size of the community jails planned as a replacement for Rikers Island. (amNY)

Activists disrupted the meetings to shout down Deputy Director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice Dana Kaplan’s testimony. (Patch)

MAMACHA café was known for it’s CBD infused drinks, snacks, and soft-serve ice cream. Unsurprisingly, it closed the same day the city’s CBD-food and drink ban was put into place. (Bedford + Bowery)

A new contract agreement between pre-K teachers and the city will bring them one step closer to pay parity with the rest of the city’s teachers, bumping up the salaries of some Community Based Organization (CBO) teachers by $20,000. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Dave Chappelle is Dave Chappelle, even when he’s on Broadway. Of course, he’s gonna stir up some controversy. (BrooklynVegan)

A new report shows that Citi Bike is failing to include New Yorkers of color and the poor. The median household income of people who lives close to a Citi Bike dock is $90,400, while the median household income of someone is $54,700. The report calls for Citi Bike to expand into 11 specific neighborhoods with “high social vulnerability.” (Curbed)

Camp Junior, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is open this summer after a two-year renovation. The camp is open for 9-to-13-year-olds from neighborhoods in the Bronx with a risk of gang activity. (Patch)

Dean & Deluca owes small businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars for providing the chain with cookies, bread, pastries, and etc and will be closing stores in an attempt to stay in business. (NY Times)

This year’s Summer Streets dates have been announced. Get ready to take over Park Ave on three Sundays in August. (Viewing NYC)

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s artist-in-residence program has selected this year’s artists. E, Jane, Elliot Reed, and Naudline Pierre. The group show from the previous cohort is up at MoMA PS1, which will also host next year’s edition. (NY Times)

How to spend a day in the Rockaways. (NY Times)

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