The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “Poison Ivy is Growing All Over the City” Edition

Photos and highlights from the USWNT’s ticker-tape parade, Citi Bike is failing NYers of color and the poor, WORD’s summer reading list, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Here’s an overview of where the Queens DA race is at the moment. (amNY)

The governor has a bill on his desk that can end the Cabán/Katz election lawsuit. Why hasn’t he signed it? (NY Times)

The state passed rent reform, but that’s no reason to let your guard down. Here are four new ways that landlords will try to raise your rent. (Gothamist)

The city started to make good on a promise made 15 years ago to bring a park to Downtown Brooklyn. The first portion of Willoughby Square Park is open to the public on the corner of Gold and Duffield. (Curbed)

Can you identify poison ivy? No? Here’s a primer, since apparently, it grows all over the city. (Gothamist)

The oldest 13 restaurants in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Adda, Atomix, and Kopitiam are now on Eater’s best new restaurants in America list. (Eater)

Photos from the World Cup USWNT Parade. (amNY)

Team captain Megan Rapinoe’s speech was full of hope and ended with a truism: “New York City, you’re the motherfucking best!” (Huff Post)

The glorious signs at the parade. (Huff Post)

If you’ve still got soccer fever, here’s a list of new or soon-to-be-built soccer fields across the city. (Localize Labs)

A history of ticker-tape parades. (6sqft)

RIP Michael Seidenberg, owner of Brazenhead Books, an Upper West Side speakeasy bookstore that held late-night salons. (Untapped Cities)

Congrats are in store to the first Trailblazers Awards from the Brooklyn Cannabiz Collective, honoring people of color who are pioneers in the cannabis industry. (Brooklyn Paper)

What’s on your summer reading list? Here’s an offering from WORD Bookstore. (Brooklyn Based)

The city announced a decrease in the size of the community jails planned as a replacement for Rikers Island. (amNY)

Activists disrupted the meetings to shout down Deputy Director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice Dana Kaplan’s testimony. (Patch)

MAMACHA café was known for it’s CBD infused drinks, snacks, and soft-serve ice cream. Unsurprisingly, it closed the same day the city’s CBD-food and drink ban was put into place. (Bedford + Bowery)

A new contract agreement between pre-K teachers and the city will bring them one step closer to pay parity with the rest of the city’s teachers, bumping up the salaries of some Community Based Organization (CBO) teachers by $20,000. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Dave Chappelle is Dave Chappelle, even when he’s on Broadway. Of course, he’s gonna stir up some controversy. (BrooklynVegan)

A new report shows that Citi Bike is failing to include New Yorkers of color and the poor. The median household income of people who lives close to a Citi Bike dock is $90,400, while the median household income of someone is $54,700. The report calls for Citi Bike to expand into 11 specific neighborhoods with “high social vulnerability.” (Curbed)

Camp Junior, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is open this summer after a two-year renovation. The camp is open for 9-to-13-year-olds from neighborhoods in the Bronx with a risk of gang activity. (Patch)

Dean & Deluca owes small businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars for providing the chain with cookies, bread, pastries, and etc and will be closing stores in an attempt to stay in business. (NY Times)

This year’s Summer Streets dates have been announced. Get ready to take over Park Ave on three Sundays in August. (Viewing NYC)

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s artist-in-residence program has selected this year’s artists. E, Jane, Elliot Reed, and Naudline Pierre. The group show from the previous cohort is up at MoMA PS1, which will also host next year’s edition. (NY Times)

How to spend a day in the Rockaways. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 21, 2019 – The “Great White Sharks in NYC Waters” Edition

The city gets serious about Long Island City, the era of OMNY has arrived, the MTA cuts bus service and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The bill that would criminalize “texting while walking” is DOA. (Streetsblog)

“I told all my friends they’re never going to see me in the Staten Island Mall again.” (Curbed)

The new logo for privately owned public spaces was unveiled from 600 entries. It’s three chairs. (amNY)

Scared of sharks? A ten-foot long great white shark was spotted a few dozen miles from the city. Just in time for the holiday weekend! (Patch)

Right now students can get a half-priced MetroCards if they live within walking distance of their school. Students often wind up paying the remainder in coins, causing the bus system to grind to a halt. This is why the city wants to get rid of them in favor of free MetroCards, good for three rides a day from 5:30am to 8:30pm for school-related activities. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Community Board approved of a protected bike lane on Flatbush Avenue from Grand Army Plaza to Empire Blvd, mirroring Prospect Park West’s lanes. (Streetsblog)

The history of New York City’s original rooftop bars. (6sqft)

Punk Island added a slew of bands to the lineup of the free punk festival on Randall’s Island, with the addition of a stage whose goal is to raise awareness for mental health and drug addiction in addition to free Narcan training and distribution. (BrooklynVegan)

Photos from Saturday’s 13th Dance Parade in the East Village. (Gothamist)

Say hello to Summer Sucks, an ongoing series from Gothamist. (Gothamist, duh)

Where to get all dressed up and not feel stupid. (The Infatuation)

It seems that only now that Amazon’s HQ2 is a distant memory, city officials are getting serious about developing the Long Island City waterfront and this time around they’re including the neighborhood in the discussions. (The Real Deal)

The state’s Attorney General opened an inquiry into more than a decade of lending practices that left thousands of immigrant taxi drives in debt, while the mayor ordered an investigation into the brokers who arranged the loans. (NY Times)

No one wants to talk to Steve Doocy. (HuffPost)

The Vendy Awards, New York’s awards for street eats, will come to a close after 15 years. (Grub Street)

Attention. If you lost an absolutely gargantuan inflatable pink flamingo in the East River, it has been found. (Gothamist)

Idea: Buses can’t run late if there are no buses! The MTA is curring service on 13 bus lines this summer. (Streetsblog)

How’re the subways treating you? The MTA says they’ve hit a five-year high of being on time. The percentage? A solid C+ at 79.8%. (Sunnyside Post)

Welcome to the era of OMNY. (mtainfo)

Meet some of the 42 heroes who are fostering 90 kittens for the ASPCA. (amNY)

Four Department of Education executives claim that they are victims of “reverse racism.” (The Root)

Here’s a look at what’s open and closed on Memorial Day. (Patch)

A look back at the Coney Island that was, through the archive of the New York Times’ photography. (NY Times)

“I consider it a social experiment, I wanted to see how people would respond to this character.” The character the saran wrapped Shiva. (Bushwick Daily)

There has been an 82% rise in anti-semitic attacks in the city compared to last year. (Bklyner)

In light of the spike, Speaker Corey Johnson is calling on the mayor to fully fund the Office of Prevention of Hate Crimes, which was approved by the city council this winter. The mayor has only funded 70% of the office. (amNY)

A gang member who participated in the killing of 15-year-old Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz said that a mistake led to the attack. (NY Times)

The MTA reports that the L Train Slowdown is going as planned. Is anyone else tired of hearing about how resilient New Yorkers are? (amNY)

Congratulations to this year’s Obie Award winners. The Obies honor Off Broadway and Off Off Broadway work, and “What the Constitution Means to Me” was named best new American play. (NY Times)

“What is art,” you may ask yourself while looking at photos of slop buckets from a restaurant in Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

24 ideal outdoor bars in the city. (Eater)

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